Anti-Racist Teacher Resources: Websites

BC Community Alliance (BCCA). https://www.bccommunityalliance.com/ 

This website is run by the local organization, BC Community Alliance, which is “dedicated to combating the structural inequities created by anti-black racism”, as stated on their platform. On this website, viewers can find blog posts related to the subject matter, a petition against anti-black racism in schools, volunteer opportunities, a newsletter subscription and more. This website does not offer an abundance of information on their cause, however they provide a contact email which educators or students may use to reach out and acquire information about this organization’s work, affiliations, and overall mission. While this website does not offer many resources on the subject of anti-racism, teachers can bring this resource into their classroom as an example of a local BC organization that recognizes the need for anti-racist activism in our province. Teachers can encourage students to do further research into this organization and present their findings to their peers. Teachers may also choose to contact this organization to speak with the class, in person or virtually, in order to discuss the issue of anti-black racism in our own community . This resource can serve as a reminder to students that anti-black racism exists in our community in many different shapes and forms, which students must recognize as they discuss this social justice issue.

(2016). BLM at School. https://www.blacklivesmatteratschool.com/about.html

This website is run by the American national coalition, “Black Lives Matter at School”, which was first established in Seattle in 2016 after a group of educators, students, and families took a stand against racism, state violence, and assault on women. Their goal is to organize for racial justice in education across America, and encourage students, educators, parents and others to raise awareness during the first week of February, which they have designated as the ‘Week of Action’. This website includes various educational resources for teachers and students, publications, principles for action, curriculum and a portal for students or educators to fill in detailing how they will be participating in the annual Week of Action. Although this website is more beneficial for educators than students, teachers can bring this resource into their classroom as an example of how a group of people can come together to form an organization, raise awareness, and stand up against systemic racism across the nation. This website may inspire students to raise awareness themselves during the February ‘Week of Action’, or come together to raise awareness and speak out against systemic racism in their own local school community.

(2020). EmbraceRace. https://www.embracerace.org/

This website is run by the American organization EmbraceRace, which was founded in 2016 by two parents who “set out to create the community and gather the resources they needed (need!) to meet the challenges they face raising children in a world where race matters” (“Who is Embrace Race?”). This organization recognizes the impact of racial inequity and disparities in America, and they aim to provide resources, raise awareness, and lead discussions on these issues. They focus specifically on providing resources for parents in raising their children to be empathetic, aware of these issues, and supportive of one another, in order to foster greater inclusivity, respect, support, and acceptance among the next generation. While this website is aimed towards parents, it can nevertheless be an excellent resource for educators to use, as it provides numerous resources such as books, articles, websites, seminars etc., which can all be beneficial for a wide audience. A unique aspect of this website that can be a very powerful tool to use in the classroom, is that they present personal stories from both children and adults who have personally experienced systemic discrimination, racism, oppression, and inequity in their lives. These stories are presented as audios, thus teachers can incorporate them into lessons, activities, research projects, or independent student assignments with various grade levels.

 

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