Tag Archives: Ong

Making Connections: ‘I write therefore I think. I think therefore I am. Who am I?’

Making Connections “the late age of print may also become the late age of prose itself” (Bolter, p 213) I have come to the conclusion, after all the readings and explorations we’ve done, that my initial response to Ong’s Orality … Continue reading

Posted in Final Project | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Mark Antony in 2013: Power of Oration and Persuasive Rhetoric

Accepting that Western society is predominantly literate it is difficult for us to recognize the oral roots upon which our culture is founded. In fact it would be near impossible to consider how an artifact from a previous culture impacts … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Balance Between Ways of Communicating

Biakolo argues convincingly in his paper “On the Theoretical Foundations of Orality and Literacy,” (1999), that Ong (1982), and others were less than fair in using Plato as their measuring stick for those in a literate Greek culture. He does this … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Commentary on the Psychodynamics of Orality Chap. 3

In the introduction to Walter Ong’s text on “Orality and Literacy” (1982) he indicates to the reader that hindsight is twenty-twenty when deconstructing history. The author explores the idea that we, as a culture, had no understanding of how orality … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Literal Technology and Human Memory: Loss or Adoption?

Review of “Orality and Literacy” Chapter Four (Ong, 1982) Having been constantly immersed in a world of written letters and print, it is hard to imagine the condition of a completely oral culture. “Orality and Literacy” from Ong (1982) informs … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Is Technology Turning Back Literacy Time?

In Orality and Literacy (1982) Ong documents the development of writing and its effect on culture by presenting a number of dichotomies between primary oral and “chirographic’ literate cultures. He states that writing transformed our society and re-structured our way … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Spectre Haunting Online Learning

For this formal commentary assignment, I have chosen to expand one of the suggested questions about Ong’s approach, as I am particularly interested in the dichotomies that arise in psychology and in education. Two of the major criticisms of Ong’s … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment