Oecologies: “Don’t Panic: The Unknowability of Early Modern Nature”

Dr. Louisa Mackenzie
(French and Italian Studies, University of Washington) “Don’t Panic: The Unknowability of Early Modern Nature”
5-6:30pm, Wed Apr 30, Coach House, Green College, UBC

Abstract: Post-Romantic Anglophone ideals of nature include an absolute “beyond” of culture, including what we now call wilderness. Many scholars have started to question the assumptions that make these ideals thinkable. Mackenzie argues that early modern cultures can help us further these critiques. Working with texts from sixteenth-century France, she will show that early modern mentalities considered wildness to be not just frightening but literally unrepresentable. Wild areas inspired a kind of epistemological panic. This etymologically-understood “panic” (pertaining to Pan the god of wild places) perhaps invites us to a more humble appraisal of our cognition of the non-human.

All those attending talks in this series are invited to stay for dinner at Green College with the speaker. Those interested in attending dinner are asked to make a reservation at least by noon the business day before. Contact 604-822-8660 or visit the Green College website for details.

Oecologies: Inhabiting Premodern Worlds is a new Speaker Series sponsored by Green College that gathers scholars from the humanities living and working along the North American Pacific coast to investigate the idea of “oecology,” an older spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” For event details, abstracts, and speaker information, please visit oecologies.com or view the event poster. Also follow us on Twitter (@Oecologies) and “Like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/oecologies)! If you have other questions about Oecologies, please do not hesitate to contact me (nardizzi@mail.ubc.ca) or our assistant, Carmel Ohman (carmelohman@gmail.com).

Law & Society: “The Legal and Judicial Architectures of Regional Trade Agreements Worldwide: A Sociological-Institutionalist Perspective”

Francesco Duina, Professor and Head,

Sociology, University of British Columbia

“The Legal and Judicial Architectures of Regional Trade Agreements Worldwide: A Sociological-Institutionalist Perspective”

A major difference among regional trade agreements (RTAs) concerns their regulatory and judicial design. Some RTAs exhibit little harmonization and instead rely on the principles of mutual recognition or references to existing international standards; the same RTAs also rely on technical dispute resolution mechanisms. Other RTAs rely by contrast on extensive harmonization and permanent courts staffed with professional judges. Yet a third group exhibits a hybrid design. These differences matter for economic and everyday life in the member states, and the functioning of national parliaments and courts. It is therefore surprising that little scholarly attention has gone to documenting and explaining the observable variation. In this paper, I put forth a sociological-institutionalist account linking the architecture of RTAs to the predominance of common versus civil law in the member states.  I turn to ten of the most important and established RTAs in the world to document the proposed variation and assess the validity of the sociological-institutionalist explanation.

Monday, March 31, 2014

5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Green College Coach House (6201 Cecil Green Park Road)

PWIAS Event: “When I Wear My Alligator Boots”

Please join the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies for a book reading and discussion with Dr. Shaylih Muehlmann, UBC Anthropology and Canada Research Chair in Language, Culture and the Environment, and Peter Wall Institute Early Career Scholar.

“When I Wear My Alligator Boots: Narco-Culture in the U.S. Mexico Borderlands” 

Date: Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Time: 4:00 pm – 4:40 pm
Location: Peter Wall Ideas Lounge, University Centre, Room 157, University of British Columbia, 6331 Crescent Road

No RSVP is required. This is a free event open to UBC Faculty and guests. Cash beer, wine and tapas available. 

When I Wear My Alligator Boots examines how the lives of dispossessed men and women are affected by the rise of narcotrafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border. In particular, the book explores a crucial tension at the heart of the “war on drugs”: despite the violence and suffering brought on by drug cartels, for the rural poor in Mexico’s north, narcotrafficking offers one of the few paths to upward mobility and is a powerful source of cultural meanings and local prestige.

Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies
University of British Columbia

6331 Crescent Rd, Vancouver, BC   V6T 1Z2

http://pwias.ubc.ca/events/

Events on Campus: Performing Utopias

Performing Utopias is a three-day interdisciplinary conference on the concept and practice of utopia in art and life. We look forward to fruitful presentations and discussions on the presence and prevalence of performing utopias. The event includes presentations/performances by Dana Claxton, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Ashok Mathur, Peter Morin, David Khang, Ayujmi Goto, Sarah Shamash, Michael Sakamoto, Waewdao Sirisook, Am Johal, Jayce Salloum, among others. Keynote presentations by Diana Taylor and Ann Stoler.

Conference presentations/performances will be spread out over campus, including the Liu Institute for Global Issues, the Chan Centre Telus Studio Theatre, the Dorothy Somerset Studio Theatre, the First Nations Longhouse, and other locations on campus.

 

Oecologies: “Different Models of the Natural World?”

Dr. Lisa Shapiro
(Philosophy, Simon Fraser University)
“Different Models of the Natural World?”
5-6:30pm, Wed Feb 26, Coach House, Green College, UBC

Abstract: Two models of the natural world can be found within seventeenth-century philosophy. One model conceives of the “natural world” as an intricate clock and dominates efforts to explain natural phenomena through efficient causes. The second provides a background to utopian visions, imagining lush, textured landscapes where social problems vanish and human beings flourish and live peaceably together. Do these models present distinct, competing visions of the natural world? Or is there a way of reconciling them? Considering how each situates human beings within the natural world suggests they can be reconciled.

Oecologies: Inhabiting Premodern Worlds is a new Speaker Series sponsored by Green College that gathers scholars from the humanities living and working along the North American Pacific coast to investigate the idea of “oecology,” an older spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” For event details, abstracts, and speaker information, please visit oecologies.com or view the event poster. Also follow us on Twitter (@Oecologies) and “Like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/oecologies)! If you have questions about Oecologies, please do not hesitate to contact me (nardizzi@mail.ubc.ca) or our assistant, Carmel Ohman (carmelohman@gmail.com).

Best,

Law & Society Lecture: “The Chronic Failure to Control Prisoner Isolation in US and Canadian Law ”

Lisa Kerr

Doctorial Candidate in Law and Trudeau Foundation Scholar,

New York University

“The Chronic Failure to Control Prisoner Isolation in US and Canadian Law ”

The decision to isolate a prisoner can profoundly intensify the severity of a legal sanction of imprisonment. While Canada and the United States have distinct constitutional traditions, and distinct practices of isolation itself, the formal legal controls over solitary confinement in each country are strikingly similar. American courts have articulated protections for the severely mentally ill, but no court has found indefinite isolation to be constitutionally barred. Litigation under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms could have a different outcome, but the US experience of litigating solitary reveals the limits of judicial intervention as a means to generate effective controls over prisoner isolation.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Room 123, Faculty of Law (1822 East Mall)

Annual Marlee Kline Lecture in Social Justice: “I am who you are”

On January 30, 2014, at 6:00 pm, the Faculty of Law will host its annual Marlee Kline Lecture in Social Justice.  Our lecturer this year is Bonnie Sherr Klein, OC, a noted documentary filmmaker and disability rights and feminist activist.  Bonnie will be receiving an honorary doctorate from UBC in May 2014.

This one hour Lecture, entitled “I am Who You Are”,  will be held at the law school, Allard Hall, Room 104, with a reception to follow. This talk will include film clips.

China’s ‘Upstream Dilemma’ as an Emerging World Power – How does International Law Facilitate Transboundary Water Cooperation?

Sponsor: Institute of Asian Research
Place: Conference room #120, C.K. Choi Building, 1855 West Mall
By: Patricia Wouters, Professor of International Law, Xiamen University, China
Type: Seminar
Dates: Tuesday, Jan 28, 2014 to Tuesday, Jan 28, 2014
Time: 4:30 pm

China will soon become the world’s largest economy and continues on a strong development path, which will only increase its demand for freshwater resources. Already China and Asia suffer the adverse affects of water scarcity, both in quantity and quality, which constrains economic, social and environmental health across the region. Under China’s new leadership the official foreign policy strategy is ‘good neighbourliness’, to find peaceful solutions to international issues through consultation and negotiation. How is this reflected in China’s approach to its transboundary water resources? China is upstream on most of its 40+ major transboundary waters and has concluded a limited number of treaties in this field, leaving most of the waters flowing from the Himalayan Water Towers outside of international agreements. With pressing needs increasing across the region, exacerbated by climate change, politicial unrest, and the drive for development, how does international law facilitate transboundary water cooperation, especially in the absence of regional support for the UN Watercourses Convention and in the context of existing state practice?

More information HERE