The Modern Day Taco: Butternut Squash & Black Beans

All copyrights reserved by Dietitians of Canada. Photo retrieved from Cookspiration.

March is Nutrition Month and this year there are 12 featured recipes for you to try! As a lover of butternut squash and avocados, this is my favourite recipe – it’s both delicious and nutritious. Sweet butternut squash combined with creamy avocados is a match made in heaven! This recipe also contains at least one ingredient from each food group, making it a balanced meal that you can enjoy for lunch or dinner.

Two great ingredients in this recipe are black beans and butternut squash. Read on to learn more about the nutritional benefits of butternut squash and black beans, and find helpful purchasing and preparation tips for your next meal.

Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is a type of winter squash and is available almost year-round in many grocery stores. It has orange flesh and a beige peel and it is probably best known in the form of a creamy butternut squash soup (which you can make without cream).

Butternut squash is:

  • An excellent source of beta-carotene (vitamin A) and vitamin C, higher than other squashes like acorn and spaghetti squash1.
  • Often larger than a summer squash, which means you can make more portions. There are many ways to prepare butternut squash from roasting, steaming or microwaving.

Not sure how to peel and cut a butternut squash? Check out this video.

Want to learn more about the benefits of winter squash? Click here for more information.

Student Tips:

  • Choose a butternut squash without green spots (this shows that the squash is ripe and ready to eat)
  • If winter squash (e.g. butternut, acorn, spaghetti, or kabocha squash), is on sale, don’t be afraid stock up on an extra one of two. Squash can be stored in a cool and dry place for up to 2 to 4 months!
  • Dice your squash into smaller pieces if you want it to cook quicker
  • To make butternut squash ahead of time, cook your diced butternut squash until it’s just softened. Cool and freeze in a Ziploc bag. For a quick meal, take out the frozen squash and steam or roast on a baking sheet with olive oil. You can even use half your squash now, and freeze the rest for later.

Black Beans

You may have grown up learning to fear beans because it’s believed to cause bloating and gassiness. Oligosaccharides, a short-chain sugar and type of carbohydrate found in beans, are not easily digested and can lead to stomach discomfort2. However, you can reduce the levels of these hard-to-digest sugars by soaking and rinsing dried beans before cooking or rinsing canned beans. From burger patties to tacos and fudgy brownies, black beans have re-gained their popularity and made their way back to many people’s kitchens.

Black beans are:

  • Versatile, inexpensive and quick to prepare  
  • A very good source of fibre, which can keep you full longer. A ½ cup serving provides 8g of fibre (Canada recommends 25-38g of fibre for women and men respectively)3
  • Low in fat
  • A plant protein (perfect for vegetarian dishes)

Student Tips:

  • Canned black beans can make meal prep a lot easier because they are pre-cooked. Rinse before using to lower the sodium content
  • Packaged or bulk black beans are a great option for students on a budget
  • Speed up the cooking process by soaking your beans overnight
  • Add to soups or wraps for a quick and easy source of protein
  • If you don’t like the taste of black beans, try chickpeas, red kidney beans, navy beans or lentils, or try preparing the beans in different ways for different flavours

Poster by Dietitians of Canada

Check out other Nutrition Month recipes here and challenge yourself to prepare a new recipe! Bon Appetit!


References:

1 Leslie Beck. ‘I love to eat squash this time of year, is one healthier than the others?’ Globe and Mail. 28 Oct 2014. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/i-love-to-eat-squash-this-time-of-year-is-one-healthier-than-the-others/article21352343/

2 Pulse Canada. ‘Beans and flatulence: fact or fiction?’. April 2014. http://www.pulsecanada.com/pnn/nutrition/2012/april/beans-flatulence-full

3 Dietitians of Canada. ‘Food sources of fibre’. 26 Oct 2016. https://www.dietitians.ca/Your-Health/Nutrition-A-Z/Fibre/Food-Sources-of-Fibre.aspx

Post Written by: Mei Ho