Visit us for research help, to see our  collections, or to find a place to study. At Xwi7xwa Library everyone is welcome!

 

UTown@UBC hosts programs and services at UBC that support the needs of the campus community. Do you have an idea for a project that would foster community building and connectedness on campus or in the Musqueam community?

 

 

APPLY NOW for the UTown@UBC’s $1,000 Community Grant by February 10th! For more information, grant eligibility, and previous projects visit their site!

 

 

Interested in Indigenous Community Planning as a career? UBC offers courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels through the School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP). The program gives students the opportunity to complete an Indigenous Community Planning (ICP) concentration, to learn more visit the ICP site.

 

Already enrolled with SCARP and looking for resources? Here’s a few titles to get you started.

  1. Decolonizing Planning: Experiences with Urban Aboriginal Communities and First Nations edited by Ian Skelton. Find me at UBC Library!
  2. Vancouver Dialogues: First Nations, Urban Aboriginal and Immigrant Communities by Zool Suleman. Find me at UBC Library!
  3. Community-Based Development Planning in Native Communities: a Resource Book for Community Organizers by Art Napolean. Find me at UBC Library!

LAW LIBRARY level 3: E98.M44 C36 2019
Martin J. Cannon, Men, Masculinity, and the Indian Act (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2019).
Online access: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=10139741

LAW LIBRARY level 3: HF1411 .G663 2019
Sarah Biddulph & Ljiljana Biuković, eds., Good Governance in Economic Development: International Norms and Chinese Perspectives (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2019).
Online access: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=10137227

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD7897 .M665 2019
James E. Moran, Madness on Trial: A Transatlantic History of English Civil Law and Lunacy (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KDK110 .C37 2019
Laura Cahillane & Jennifer Schweppe, eds., Case Studies in Legal Research Methodologies: Reflections on Theory and Practice (Dublin: Clarus Press, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE8422 .L83 2019
Cynthia Tape & Julie Rosenthal, Modern Trial Advocacy: Analysis and Practice: Canada (Boulder: National Institute for Trial Advocacy, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KJE6569 .T74 2019
Lucila de Almeida et al, eds., The Transformation of Economic Law: Essays in Honour of Hans-W. Micklitz (Oxford: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, 2019).

The UBC Library exhibition explores the stories of the men and women who collected, recorded and brought forth evidence of the atrocities of Auschwitz, giving testimony of the events that took place there. The exhibit runs until February 28 on Level 2 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.



Creativity in the Arts: The Role of Copyright

Date

Tuesday, February 25, 2020 – 1:00pm to 4:15pm

Location

British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT), Downtown Campus, Atrium Room, 8th floor (Room 825)

Full Details and Registration (please register by Feb. 18)

On Tuesday February 25, to mark Fair Dealing Week, SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, VCC, and BCIT invite you to an afternoon of presentations and discussion exploring the impact of copyright and fair dealing on artists working in a variety of disciplines. Light refreshments will be served.

Keynote: Copyrights to the Rescue! (Or Not)

Brianne Selman, Scholarly Communications and Copyright Librarian at the University of Winnipeg and co-investigator on the Cultural Capital Project

Brianne will talk about this collaborative research project that explores the history of the increasing concentration and corporatization of the music industry and investigates a new model of remuneration. Brianne will describe this new model and the theoretical trajectories, legal ramifications, and technical components involved in creating a non-profit patronage system and social network that would directly connect musical artists and fans. Ideally the system would facilitate the payment of both artists and their fans for their creative efforts, while also crafting legal and theoretical arguments for a more open copyright regime.

Panel: Copyright and the Creative Arts

Following Brianne’s talk there will be a panel discussion moderated by Martha Rans, the Director of the Artists’ Legal Outreach. The panel brings together Vancouver-based artists working in a range of creative disciplines for a discussion of how and when artists have to consider copyright, how copyright intersects with the practice of artists, and what this entails. This is an area that is not often addressed in detail in post-secondaries, yet is a growing area of concern and interest for both students and copyright professionals in higher education.

Panelists:

Joanna Garfinkel, dramaturge at Universal Limited theatre company
Josue Menjivar, graphic novelist and illustrator, instructor at Langara College
Sean Penney, video game designer, CPO Pocket Pinata, Inc.
Evann Siebens, video and performance artist

The latest display at UBC Education Library features resources supporting the Core Competencies in BC Education.  One side of the display highlights professional books and the other side, picture books.  Each picture book includes a bookmark highlighting which Core Competency it links to.

What changed? A few of the updates include: Collaboration has been added as a second sub-competency to the Communication Core Competency, the second Thinking sub-competency is now Critical and Reflective Thinking (not just Critical Thinking) and the third Personal and Social sub-competency is now Social Awareness and Responsibility (not just Social Responsibility).

Please visit our Core Competencies Booklists if you’re unable to make it to our display in person or would like to browse our curated lists of resources from home.  Printed copies of these booklists are also available at the service desk.

The display is located just outside the Young Learners Library, Main Level, UBC Education Library and will be up until the end of February 2020.

The Year of the Rat is approaching! Come and celebrate the Lunar New Year with the Asian Library and the Department of Asian Studies as well as other UBC groups on Tuesday January 28 at the Nest Atrium Lower Level. Enjoy wonderful performances and participate in interesting cultural activities. It is free and open to the public!

Drop by our Pop-up Library booth between 11:00 am and 2:00 pm. We will feature our Great Reads Collection and language learning materials. You will also receive a small gift when signing out books!

The celebration organized by the Department of Asian Studies will run from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. Performances include lion dance, K-pop dance, and Chinese music, etc. They also offer hands-on activities like Chinese calligraphy, paper cutting, Korean games (Gonggi and Jegichagi), Ring Toss, and more. Check out more details HERE.

In addition, the Asian Library will be featuring a display in the lobby area of Asian Centre from Jan 23 to Feb 8.  The display will highlight our collection as well as a few items from the Education Library, and will also include New Year decorations. Please stop by and take a look!

HAPPY LUNAR NEW YEAR! Wishing everyone a happy and prosperous Year of the Rat!

UBC Education Library’s newest display theme is Graphic Novels.  Come by and check them out!

 

Date: Tuesday, February 11, 2020
Time: 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. (Light refreshments at 9:30 a.m.)
Location: C. K. Choi Building Room 120 (Conference Room)
Instructor: Mr. Kazunori Oryū

UBC Library is offering a basic Japanese paper conservation workshop by renowned conservator, Mr. Kazunori Oryū. Mr. Oryū has studied painting conservation at the studio of Oka Bokkōdō in Kyōto where he developed his skills and expertise working with Japanese cultural heritage items such as hanging scrolls, screens and books. He is a Conservation Consultant for private and public collections, and he provides preservation planning and preventive and conservation treatment service for paintings, heritage document and manuscript collections. He has lectured extensively in North America and Europe.

This workshop focuses on Japanese scroll mounting and bookbinding using Japanese restoration and conservation techniques. The workshop will incorporate lectures, demonstrations and practical work including handling of Japanese traditional materials. This is a valuable professional development opportunity for paper conservators as well as for artists, craftspeople, library and museum staff, and anyone interested in the Japanese book history.

Admissions is free, but registration is required. Please register here: Registration Link.

For more information, please contact Tomoko Kitayama Yen, Japanese Studies Librarian, at tomoko.kitayama@ubc.ca.

Before the invention of the printing press, books were produced by hand. You can find examples of such manuscripts from the 13th and 14th centuries in the collection of Western Manuscripts and Early Printed Books.

[Bible], [between 1200 and 1299]

One of the oldest manuscript books in Open Collections is a Latin Bible from the 13th century. It was written and decorated in England, probably Oxford, by several hands. It includes Old and New Testaments (in 2 columns, 50 lines), Interpretationes Hebraicorum nominum (in 3 columns, 50 lines), and an early owner’s near-contemporary concordance of the Gospels at the end of the volume, listing subjects and chapter numbers in a series of long tables. It also contains numerous 13th to 16th century additions (in margins) in pen or drypoint.

Old and New Testaments

Interpretationes Hebraicorum nominum

Concordance of the Gospels

If you’re interested in learning more about this Bible, please check out this blog post.

[Book of hours], [between 1430 and 1440?]

The book of hours is a book of Christian prayers and devotions popular in the Middle Ages. It is the most common type of surviving medieval illuminated manuscript, decorated with plenty of miniatures, initials, and line-fillers. This manuscript was written and illuminated in Rouen, France, approximately 1430-1440. The leaf numbers made in pencil in the upper-right corner were from a previous owner.

Li dai jun jian  歷代君鑒, [1453]

China has been using woodblock technique for book printing since the 9th century (source: Wikipedia). In Open Collections, the oldest printed Chinese book is Li dai jun jian  歷代君鑒, a book about emperors in Chinese history.

The book was compiled by order of the Jingtai Emperor, the seventh Emperor of the Ming dynasty, China, who reigned from 1449 to 1457. When his elder brother Zhengtong Emperor was captured by Mongols in 1449, he was selected to succeed the throne. Jingtai Emperor asked his officials to compile a book of past emperors, both good and poor, so that he could draw lessons from the history. The book was issued in 1453. But unfortunately for him, only four years later, his elder brother managed to regain power. Jingtai died a month later at the age of 30. (Source: Wikipedia).

Handan 邯鄲, 1621

The oldest Chinese printed book with illustrations is Handan 邯鄲, a play written by Tang Xianzu. In the 17th century, watching plays was such popular entertainment that books of plays were in high demand. This book is a double-colour woodblock print. It has eight illustrations at the beginning, and a lot of comments printed in red and black in the margins.

We hope you enjoyed this blog post! To explore more rare books in Open Collections, please check out Western Manuscripts and Early Printed Books and Chinese Rare Books. You may also be interested in this research guide from UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections: UBC Vancouver Course Guides:  History of the Book.

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