The Canadian bakery industry involves the on-site manufacturing of baked products. These products can include but are not limited to bagels, bread, cakes, croissants, doughnuts, and pastries. This industry overview will discuss the latest statistics and trends for the bakery industry in Canada. For more information on the bakery industry please see our Bakery Guide.

Photo credit: Photo by Pexels

Key Takeaways

  • Modest Growth: The Canadian bakery product market grew by a compound annualized rate of 2.2% during 2013-2017 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Modest Outlook: The Canadian bakery product market is expected to grow at a compound annualized rate of 3.4% from 2018-2022 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Food Intolerances: Gluten-free is the fastest growing food intolerance category in Canada (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014).
  • Celiac Disease: Canadians with Celiac disease are a small, but important segment of the market for gluten-free bakery products (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014; Health Canada, 2018).

Industry Performance Snapshot

During 2013-2017:

  • Retail sales of baked goods grew from $3.2 billion (USD) in 2013 to $3.5 billion (USD) in 2017 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Per capita expenditure on baked goods increased from $146.7 (USD) in 2013 to $153.5 (USD) in 2017 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Bread sales accounted for the largest portion of baked goods sales each year. In 2017, bread sales accounted for $3.5 billion (USD) or almost 63% of total sales that years (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2018). Sector Trend Analysis – Baked Goods in the United States and Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/international-agri-food-market-intelligence/reports/sector-trend-analysis-baked-goods-in-the-united-states-and-canada/?id=1537381272039

Industry Outlook

For the period 2018-2022:

  • Retail sales of baked goods are expected to grow by a compound annualized growth rate of 3.4%, reaching $6.6 billion (USD) in 2022 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Per capital expenditure on baked goods is expected to increase by a compound annualized growth rate of 2.5%, reaching $173.2 in 2022 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Bread sales will continue to dominate the bakery market. In 2022, bread sales are expected to account for $4.2 billion (USD) or almost 64% of baked goods sales that years (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2018). Sector Trend Analysis – Baked Goods in the United States and Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/international-agri-food-market-intelligence/reports/sector-trend-analysis-baked-goods-in-the-united-states-and-canada/?id=153738127203

Business Locations

In 2016, 81.4% of industry employers were located in three provinces: Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia. Quebec was Canada’s top employer with a total of 788 establishments that year.

Source: Statistics Canada. Establishments by Employment Type and Province/Territory (2016). Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/3118

As shown in the table below, the majority of industry establishments were small establishments that employed between 5-99 employees. Overall, these small establishments accounted for 67.9% of all industry establishments in 2016.

Province/Territory

Micro (1-4)

Small (5-99)

Medium (100-499)

Large (500+)

Ontario

218

518

52

0

Quebec

120

322

23

1

British Columbia

90

225

16

0

Alberta

41

107

4

0

Manitoba

15

47

2

0

Nova Scotia

14

27

2

0

Saskatchewan

8

30

1

0

New Brunswick

7

26

2

0

Newfoundland and Labrador

6

10

1

0

Yukon

1

2

0

0

Northwest Territories

0

0

0

0

Nunavut

0

0

0

0

Prince Edward Island

0

0

0

0

Canada

520

1322

103

1

Percentage distribution %

26.7

67.9

5.3

0.0

Source: Statistics Canada. Establishments by Employment Size Category and Province/Territory (2016). Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/3118

Trends and Changes

Health conscious consumers

  • Canadians prefer bakery products that are not only more natural, but also contain less preservatives. As a result, more Canadians are moving away from highly-processed products (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Canadians desire accurate information to make informed purchasing decisions (especially for gluten-free products) (Allergen Control Group, 2017).
  • More Canadians are watching their sugar and salt intake due to concerns over diabetes and high blood pressure (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Increasing popularity of Ketogenic and Paleo diets means that more Canadians are cutting back on their carbohydrate intake (Bell, 2019).
  • Canadian bakery industry is responding to health concerns and consumer trends by increasing the range of baked goods (eg. gluten-free) produced as well as highlighting the health benefits (eg. reduced/low fat) of those goods (Bell, 2019).

Growing awareness of Celiac disease

  • 350,000 Canadians or 1% of the national population has Celiac disease (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014).
  • Individuals with Celiac disease must maintain a strict-gluten free diet. As such, they are unable to eat bagels, cakes, doughnuts and other primary products of the Canadian bakery industry (Health Canada, 2018).
  • Despite their relatively small size, Canadians with Celiac disease represent an important and growing segment of the market for gluten-free products (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014; Health Canada, 2018).

Gluten-free consumer demands

  • Gluten-free remains the fastest type of food intolerance category in Canada (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014).
  • Meeting the demand for gluten-free products may be the biggest challenge facing today’s bakers. This is because more bakers are having to experiment with new (and expensive) alternative grains and flours to create gluten-free products that are flavourful (Bell, 2019).
  • Canadian baking schools are having to adapt their curriculum to help better prepare future bakers to meet the reduced/no gluten demands of consumers (Bell, 2019).
  • Canadians are willing to pay more for gluten-free products. However, there is strong pressure to make these products more affordable for consumers (Allergen Control Group, 2017).

Sources

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2018). Sector Trend Analysis – Baked Goods in the United States and Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/international-agri-food-market-intelligence/reports/sector-trend-analysis-baked-goods-in-the-united-states-and-canada/?id=1537381272039

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2014). “Gluten Free” Claims in the Marketplace. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/canadian-agri-food-sector-intelligence/processed-food-and-beverages/trends-and-market-opportunities-for-the-food-processing-sector/gluten-free-claims-in-the-marketplace/?id=1397673574797

Allergen Control Group. (2017, January 24). Demand for Gluten-free Foods Expected to Substantially Increase as Awareness and Diagnosis of Celiac Continues to Rise. CISION. Retrieved from: https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/demand-for-gluten-free-foods-expected-to-substantially-increase-as-awareness-and-diagnosis-of-celiac-disease-continue-to-rise-611631355.html

Bell, E. (2019, March 22). Bread Trends for 2019. Bakers Journal. Retrieved from: https://www.bakersjournal.com/news/bread-trends-for-2019-7674

Health Canada. (2019). Celiac Disease: The Gluten Connection. Retrieved from: https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/hc-sc/documents/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/celiac-disease-gluten-connection/26-18-2047-Food%20Allergen-Celiac-EN-FINAL.pdf

Statistics Canada. (2016). Establishments by Employment Size Category and Province/Territory. Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/3118

Industry Trends

The Canadian bakery industry involves the on-site manufacturing of baked products. These products can include but are not limited to bagels, bread, cakes, croissants, doughnuts, and pastries. This industry overview will discuss the latest statistics and trends for the bakery industry in Canada. For more information on the bakery industry please see our Bakery Guide.

Photo credit: Photo by Pexels

Key Takeaways

  • Modest Growth: The Canadian bakery product market grew by a compound annualized rate of 2.2% during 2013-2017 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Modest Outlook: The Canadian bakery product market is expected to grow at a compound annualized rate of 3.4% from 2018-2022 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Food Intolerances: Gluten-free is the fastest growing food intolerance category in Canada (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014).
  • Celiac Disease: Canadians with Celiac disease are a small, but important segment of the market for gluten-free bakery products (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014; Health Canada, 2018).

Industry Performance Snapshot

During 2013-2017:

  • Retail sales of baked goods grew from $3.2 billion (USD) in 2013 to $3.5 billion (USD) in 2017 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Per capita expenditure on baked goods increased from $146.7 (USD) in 2013 to $153.5 (USD) in 2017 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Bread sales accounted for the largest portion of baked goods sales each year. In 2017, bread sales accounted for $3.5 billion (USD) or almost 63% of total sales that years (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2018). Sector Trend Analysis – Baked Goods in the United States and Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/international-agri-food-market-intelligence/reports/sector-trend-analysis-baked-goods-in-the-united-states-and-canada/?id=1537381272039

Industry Outlook

For the period 2018-2022:

  • Retail sales of baked goods are expected to grow by a compound annualized growth rate of 3.4%, reaching $6.6 billion (USD) in 2022 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Per capital expenditure on baked goods is expected to increase by a compound annualized growth rate of 2.5%, reaching $173.2 in 2022 (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Bread sales will continue to dominate the bakery market. In 2022, bread sales are expected to account for $4.2 billion (USD) or almost 64% of baked goods sales that years (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2018). Sector Trend Analysis – Baked Goods in the United States and Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/international-agri-food-market-intelligence/reports/sector-trend-analysis-baked-goods-in-the-united-states-and-canada/?id=153738127203

Business Locations

In 2016, 81.4% of industry employers were located in three provinces: Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia. Quebec was Canada’s top employer with a total of 788 establishments that year.

Source: Statistics Canada. Establishments by Employment Type and Province/Territory (2016). Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/3118

As shown in the table below, the majority of industry establishments were small establishments that employed between 5-99 employees. Overall, these small establishments accounted for 67.9% of all industry establishments in 2016.

Province/Territory

Micro (1-4)

Small (5-99)

Medium (100-499)

Large (500+)

Ontario

218

518

52

0

Quebec

120

322

23

1

British Columbia

90

225

16

0

Alberta

41

107

4

0

Manitoba

15

47

2

0

Nova Scotia

14

27

2

0

Saskatchewan

8

30

1

0

New Brunswick

7

26

2

0

Newfoundland and Labrador

6

10

1

0

Yukon

1

2

0

0

Northwest Territories

0

0

0

0

Nunavut

0

0

0

0

Prince Edward Island

0

0

0

0

Canada

520

1322

103

1

Percentage distribution %

26.7

67.9

5.3

0.0

Source: Statistics Canada. Establishments by Employment Size Category and Province/Territory (2016). Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/3118

Trends and Changes

Health conscious consumers

  • Canadians prefer bakery products that are not only more natural, but also contain less preservatives. As a result, more Canadians are moving away from highly-processed products (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Canadians desire accurate information to make informed purchasing decisions (especially for gluten-free products) (Allergen Control Group, 2017).
  • More Canadians are watching their sugar and salt intake due to concerns over diabetes and high blood pressure (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sector Trend Analysis, 2018).
  • Increasing popularity of Ketogenic and Paleo diets means that more Canadians are cutting back on their carbohydrate intake (Bell, 2019).
  • Canadian bakery industry is responding to health concerns and consumer trends by increasing the range of baked goods (eg. gluten-free) produced as well as highlighting the health benefits (eg. reduced/low fat) of those goods (Bell, 2019).

Growing awareness of Celiac disease

  • 350,000 Canadians or 1% of the national population has Celiac disease (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014).
  • Individuals with Celiac disease must maintain a strict-gluten free diet. As such, they are unable to eat bagels, cakes, doughnuts and other primary products of the Canadian bakery industry (Health Canada, 2018).
  • Despite their relatively small size, Canadians with Celiac disease represent an important and growing segment of the market for gluten-free products (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014; Health Canada, 2018).

Gluten-free consumer demands

  • Gluten-free remains the fastest type of food intolerance category in Canada (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, “Gluten Free”, 2014).
  • Meeting the demand for gluten-free products may be the biggest challenge facing today’s bakers. This is because more bakers are having to experiment with new (and expensive) alternative grains and flours to create gluten-free products that are flavourful (Bell, 2019).
  • Canadian baking schools are having to adapt their curriculum to help better prepare future bakers to meet the reduced/no gluten demands of consumers (Bell, 2019).
  • Canadians are willing to pay more for gluten-free products. However, there is strong pressure to make these products more affordable for consumers (Allergen Control Group, 2017).

Sources

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2018). Sector Trend Analysis – Baked Goods in the United States and Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/international-agri-food-market-intelligence/reports/sector-trend-analysis-baked-goods-in-the-united-states-and-canada/?id=1537381272039

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2014). “Gluten Free” Claims in the Marketplace. Retrieved from: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/canadian-agri-food-sector-intelligence/processed-food-and-beverages/trends-and-market-opportunities-for-the-food-processing-sector/gluten-free-claims-in-the-marketplace/?id=1397673574797

Allergen Control Group. (2017, January 24). Demand for Gluten-free Foods Expected to Substantially Increase as Awareness and Diagnosis of Celiac Continues to Rise. CISION. Retrieved from: https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/demand-for-gluten-free-foods-expected-to-substantially-increase-as-awareness-and-diagnosis-of-celiac-disease-continue-to-rise-611631355.html

Bell, E. (2019, March 22). Bread Trends for 2019. Bakers Journal. Retrieved from: https://www.bakersjournal.com/news/bread-trends-for-2019-7674

Health Canada. (2019). Celiac Disease: The Gluten Connection. Retrieved from: https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/hc-sc/documents/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/celiac-disease-gluten-connection/26-18-2047-Food%20Allergen-Celiac-EN-FINAL.pdf

Statistics Canada. (2016). Establishments by Employment Size Category and Province/Territory. Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/3118

Industry Trends
The Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection exhibition at Rare Books and Special Collections has welcomed it's 10,000th visitor!

As a part of the digitization project for Association of University and College Employees (AUCE) fonds, we digitized an audio cassette tape entitled “The Steward”, which is a speech recording about being a union steward. Today, we will show how we digitize an audio cassette tape.

 

Equipment

To digitize a cassette, we use the following equipment:

  • Cassette tape deck: An ION Tape 2 PC USB cassette deck
  • Audio capture and editing software: We use Audacity, a free, open-source application
  • Computer: A Mac Pro running macOS 10.14.5

 

Damage repair

Before starting the digitization, we had to repair the tape as it was broken (this is common with older cassette tapes), and we took this opportunity to put the tape in a new housing (the original housing is shown above). It is important to have the tape in optimal condition before digitization and preservation.

 

Digitization Process

We followed the sample workflow for tape digitization in the Audacity wiki.

  1. First, the cassette deck (Tape 2 PC) is connected to the Mac to export the audio for digitization. We connected the USB cable directly to a free USB port on the Mac, and turned it on.

USB port is on the left. The Tape 2 PC also has an RCA output.

 

  1. Since we are using a Mac, we needed to set up an audio input to ensure that the Tape 2 PC signal could be picked up by the Audacity software. We set a sample rate of 44100 Hz and 16-bit format which is the standard for CD burning. For more information, please follow the instructions in the Audacity wiki, Mac and USB input devices.
  2. Once all the settings were made, we did a test recording and made sure the levels were correct (i.e. no clipping, a form of sound distortion). We aimed for a maximum peak of -6 dB.


The green bar should not reach more than -6 dB.

 

  1. Then we started the digitization. We played the cassette in the deck first and clicked the recording button in Audacity immediately after. Since we recorded both sides of the tape, we paused the recording after the first side and resumed after switching to the second side.

Cassette is played for digitization.

Audacity interface on the Mac.

 

Exporting a file for access and preservation

Once the tape is digitized, we exported the file in WAV format. WAV with linear (uncompressed) PCM is a preferred and recommended format for long-term preservation. Once we upload it to our content management system, we will digitally preserve it with Archivematica.

For access purposes, we converted the WAV file to MP3 format. MP3 is a compressed audio file which is widely supported and playable on nearly all devices with a more manageable file size.

Once metadata is created for the exported file, the audio will be ready to upload.

Please find the recording on UBC Rare Books and Special Collections’ Access to Memory (AtoM) database. The audio will soon be available in Open Collections!

 

See also

Click on the book cover to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

New kid / Jerry Craft; with colour by Jim Callahan.
PZ7.7.C733 Nw 2019 at EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

 

 

Anne Frank’s diary: the graphic adaptation / Anne Frank; adapted by Ari Folman; illustrations by David Polonsky.
DS135.N6 F731865 2018
at KOERNER LIBRARY Great Reads (Floor 3)
& OKANAGAN LIBRARY stacks

Shigeru Mizuki’s Kitaro. The Great Tanuki War / Shigeru Mizuki; translated by Zack Davisson.
PN6790.J33 M59913416 2017 at OKANAGAN LIBRARY stacks

Simone: the best monster ever! / written and illustrated by Remy Simard; translated by Karen Li.
PZ7.7.S552 Sm 2017  at EDUCATION LIBRARY Canadian Children’s Book Centre

 

Click on the book cover to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

A class by themselves? : the origins of special education in Toronto and beyond / Jason Ellis.
LC3965 .E45 2019 at EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

 

Nature-based learning for young children: anytime, anywhere, on any budget / Julie Powers, Sheila Williams Ridge.
LB1139.5.S35 P68 2019 at EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

 

The orchid and the dandelion : why some children struggle and how all can thrive / W. Thomas Boyce, MD.
HQ755.8 .B694 2019 at EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

Preparing teachers for deeper learning / Linda Darling-Hammond, Jeannie Oakes.
LB1715 .D344 2019 at EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

 

The Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection exhibition at Rare Books and Special Collections has been open to visitors in its current location in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre since April 2008. Since then, the RBSC team has diligently tracked attendance. Earlier today, we were delighted to welcome the 10,000th and 10,001st visitors to the Chung Collection exhibition!

Over the years, the visitors to the Chung Collection have been diverse and varied, including UBC classes, visiting scholars, University staff, students and faculty, seniors groups, as well as community members from Greater Vancouver and many visitors from afar. Today’s special visitors were Ivy Ng (the 10,000th visitor) and Susanna Ng (the 10,001st visitor). Ivy and Susanna had known about the Chung Collection for some time and finally visited the exhibition to see in person some of the Collection’s many special and unique artifacts related to the Chinese community. They were thrilled to discover they were milestone visitors to the exhibition, particularly Ivy, who received a UBC Library gift bag. Given their good luck today, Ivy and Susanna said they were considering buying a lottery ticket. Like most lottery hopefuls, they have already partially spent their winnings—generously offering funds for a Chung Collection endowment if they win big.

The Chung Collection exhibition features only a small portion of the Chung Collection’s more than 25,000 items. Materials not on display can be accessed for consultation in the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room. Accumulated over 60 years by Dr. Wallace Chung, the extraordinary Chung Collection covers three main themes: early British Columbia history and exploration, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and early immigration and settlement with a focus on the Chinese diaspora.

Stay tuned for 20,000th visitor celebrations!

The Law Library is offering the following training sessions for current Allard School of Law students and faculty.

WestlawNext Canada

  • Monday, September 16, 2019 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
  • Wednesday, September 18, 2019 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Lexis Advance Quicklaw

  • Wednesday, September 23, 2019 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
  • Monday, September 25, 2019 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

To register, please see Database Training Sessions.

The Lillooet Room, part of the Chapman Learning Commons in Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, has been renamed the Antonio and Marissa Peña Learning and Events Room.

Did you know that mountains cover 75 per cent of British Columbia[i]? Like the beaches we introduced in April, mountains offer beautiful scenery in summer. Today, we will focus on the Canadian Rockies depicted and described in our digitized photographs, illustrations, and books in Open Collections.

 

Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, you can find postcards of the Rockies:

Mt. Robson

This is a postcard of Mt. Robson, the highest peak (3,954 m; 12,972 ft) in British Columbia and of all the Canadian Rockies mountains:

Frank, Leonard. Mt. Robson, highest peak, Canadian Rockies, 1927

 

Mt. Field

Another postcard depicts Mt. Field (2,643 m; 8,671 ft), located within the Yoho National Park.

Mt. Field, Rockies, 1920

 

Mt. Stephen

The Langmann Collection has a photograph album titled, “20 real photographs of Canadian Rocky Mountains”. This is the photo of Field, BC and Mt. Stephen (3,199 m; 10,496 ft), which is also located within Yoho National Park. Mt. Stephen is the tallest of the mountains surrounding the town:

Field and Mount Stephen, [between 1920 and 1925?].

Chung Collection

Castle Mountain (Miistsukskoowa)

The Chung Collection also has numerous photographs of the Canadian Rockies mountains. Castle Mountain (Miistsukskoowa), a traditional territory of Siksika First Nation[ii], is located within Banff National park. It has numerous rock-climbing routes:

R. H. Trueman & Company. [Castle Mountain, Banff, Alberta], [between 1890 and 1899?].

The Three Sisters mountains

William Notman & Sons photography. [Three Sisters mountain range at Canmore, Alberta], 1899.

Mt. Assiniboine

Mt. Assiniboine (3,618 m; 11,870 ft) is located on the British Columbia/Alberta border.

Mt. Assiniboine, [between 1930 and 1939?].

Canadian Pacific Railway’s Advertisements

In the Chung Collection, we have digitized many advertising pamphlets of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company’s hotels and train tours which have beautiful illustrations on their front pages.

This 100-page booklet includes the detailed descriptions of each sightseeing spot in the Canadian Rockies:

The challenge of the mountains, 1904.

This five-page pamphlet also summarizes the resorts in the Rockies:

Through the Canadian Rockies, 1931.

 

BC Historical Books collection

BC Historical Books collection has books from the late 19th century and the early 19th century about the Canadian Rockies:

Outram, James, Sir. In the heart of the Canadian Rockies, 1905.

Coleman, A. P. The Canadian Rockies : new and old trails. With 3 maps and 41 illustrations, 1911.

 

We hope you have a chance to enjoy the mountain views this summer. If you want to explore more mountains in Open Collections, here are some items and keywords you can access:


[i] Geography of B.C. (Welcome BC)

[ii] Siksika Nation, federal government to honour Blackhoot traditions with Castle Mountain Settlement (Jan 25, 2017 in CBC News)

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

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