You might have noticed that the Education Library’s website has been refreshed! As we head into a new year, we wanted to make sure that everyone who uses our library was able to find our most sought-after resources and answers to common questions as efficiently as possible. We’ve created new categories that reflect the scholarly activities happening in the Faculty of Education and the library resources that are most needed to support those activities. You’ll find our most-used guides for research in education and juvenile literature, library materials for teaching, learning and lesson design, and faculty and graduate student supports right from our main page. As always, please reach out to the Education Library team for further information about library services and assistance finding and utilizing library and research materials.

 

 

UBC Education Library opening hours are a little different than usual during the month of December.  Please check the official UBC Library hours calendar for our opening hours over the holidays.

Rendering of the Chapman Learning Commons renovations.

 

The Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) on Level 3 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre will be closed for renovations starting Wednesday, December 19, 2018. The Lillooet and Dodson Rooms will not be available to book during this time, but there will be no changes in access to the Music, Art, and Architecture Library and the CLC Help Desk.

The space is expected to reopen on Monday, January 21, 2019.

Please refer to the Library Hours & Locations to make alternative plans.

The UBC libraries are closing early on Christmas Eve. Please come to the library early if you plan to borrow items for your holiday reading.

The Asian Library holiday hours are:

Saturday December 22 & Sunday December 23: Closed
Monday December 24: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Tuesday December 25 – Tuesday January 1: Closed

Normal hours resume on Wednesday January 2, 2019. For more information on UBC Library hours, please visit Hours and Locations.

This industry overview includes the latest statistics and trends for both full service and limited service restaurants. 

  • Full service restaurants, providing food services to patrons who order and are served while seated (i.e., waiter/waitress service) and pay after eating. 
  • Limited service restaurants, which are primarily engaged in providing food services (except snack and non-alcoholic beverage bars) where patrons order and pay before eating. Food and drink may be consumed on premises, taken out, or delivered to the customer's location.  These are also known as fast-service or fast-food restaurants.

For more specific information about researching the restaurant industry, please see our Restaurant Industry Guide

For information about related industries please see our industry guides for Catering, Bakery, Coffee Shop, Bar & Nightclub, Specialty Foods, Street Food Vendor.  


Content


Industry Status

Industry phase: Mature            

Concentration: Low            

Competition: High

Regulation: Medium-High

Barriers to entry: Medium


BC Industry performance snapshot

Sales

  • As of September 2018, BC food services and drinking place sales totalled $1,038,023,000 (Statistics Canada)
  • Sales were up in every province in the third quarter of 2018, with the largest gains in dollar terms in British Columbia, +8.0%. (Statistics Canada)
  • Prices for food purchased from restaurants rose 4.4% year over year in the third quarter. (Statistics Canada) 

Source: Statistics Canada Table 21-10-0019-01 Monthly survey of food services and drinking places (x 1,000)

Source: Statistics Canada Table 21-10-0019-01 Monthly survey of food services and drinking places (x 1,000)


Positive industry indicators

Consumer spending power 

The restaurant industry is affected by disposable income, consumer confidence and levels of unemployment. 

  • Per capita disposable income is forecast to grow at an annualized rate of 2.7% over the next five years, enabling a greater number of Canadian consumers to eat out at industry establishments. 
  • Full service restaurants are also going to be boosted by an anticipated increase in corporate profit and subsequent increase in client entertainment spending. 
  • Consumer spending is projected to continue growing at a steady rate over the five years to 2022, driven by relatively low unemployment and high levels of disposable income. 
  • Strong growth in the number of households earning more than $100,000 per year will lead to greater spending in the industry's high-end segments. 

(Sayler, 2018)


Demand for convenience

Recent social trends, such as busier lifestyles, heavier workloads and longer working hours, have helped boost demand for restaurant services and convenience food, as time-poor consumers look to cut down on cooking times and make better use of their spare time. 


Demographic changes 

The changing age structure of the population influences industry demand. Two broad demographic trends have encouraged industry growth over the past decade. (Sayler, 2018)

  • The baby-boomer generation has access to higher disposable incomes than previous generations, meaning they are more likely to spend on eating out. 
  • Young adults aged between 18 and 30 are delaying marriage and having children later; this enables young consumers to spend a greater proportion of their income on dining out. This millennial age bracket is spending a higher proportion of their food budget eating out than any other age bracket, making them a key target market and driver of change. 


National Growth

Both full and limited service industries have seen moderate growth over the past five years, with growth also predicted for the next five, albeit at a slower rate. 

  • Growth rate - revenue:
Full service     
2013 - 2018 4.1%  
2018 - 2023 2.1%  

 

Limited service   
2012 - 2017 4.5%
2017 - 2022 2.2%

 

  • Growth rate – number of transactions 

Industry consumption volume increased with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 1.8% between 2013 and 2017, to reach a total of 5.7 billion transactions in 2017. The industry's volume is expected to rise to 6.3 billion transactions by the end of 2022, representing a CAGR of 1.9% for the 2017-2022 period. (Marketline, 2018)

  • Growth rate – market value 

In 2017 the Canadian foodservice industry had total revenues of $54.3 billion. By 2022, this is forecast to rise to $63.3 billion, maintaining the same compound annual growth rate as the 2013 - 2017 period of 3.1%. (Marketline, 2018)


Industry challenges

Profit margins under pressure

Profit margins within the industry are generally narrow, and are under increasing pressure from rising food and labour prices. On average limited service restaurants fare better with a profit of 10.4% in 2018 (Sayler, 2018), compared to that of the full service industry at 3.2% in 2017. (Sayler, 2017) 

In 2016 Statistics Canada report that 71.1%% of all restaurants with annual revenue up to $5m are profitable. (Statistics Canada)


Barriers to success

While barriers to entry into the industry are relatively low, barriers to success (i.e. the ability to stay profitable and in operation for more than a few initial years) are relatively high. According to industry sources, about 60.0% of new full service restaurants close or change hands within three years of opening. (Sayler, 2017)


Key success factors 

Whole Industry Full Service Limited Service
  • Access to multiskilled and flexible workforce
  • Having a clear market position
  • Effective cost controls    
  • Proximity to key markets
  • Ensuring pricing policy is appropriate 
  • Business expertise of operators
  • Market research and understanding
  • Ability to franchise operations

Costs

Limited Service Industry (Sayler, 2018)

Graph of fast food restaurant industry costs
 


Full Service Industry (Sayler, 2017)
 


Employment numbers

Reflecting the low concentration within this industry, the vast majority of both full service (92%) and limited service restaurants (95%) in British Columbia have fewer than 49 employees.

Source: Statistics Canada Table  33-10-0092-01 Canadian Business Counts, with employees, June 2018 and Table 33-10-0094-01 Canadian Business Counts, without employees, June 2018  


Trends & changes


Healthy choices

Consumers are increasingly health conscious and searching for businesses that reflect those values. Many limited service restaurants have taken advantage of this trend by shifting menus away from fatty and fried foods to focus on quality products and nutritional value. Full-service restaurants are also adapting to this trend, but higher prices still keep them out of some consumers’ reach. 


Ethical considerations

Consumers are increasingly concerned about what they consume and where their food comes from, resulting in a rising demand for locally sourced, cruelty-free options as well as vegan and vegetarian menus. There are indicators this is fueling a move away from red meat towards poultry and seafood options. 


Off-premise and third party delivery

Third party delivery services have opened up the possibility of a much broader range of restaurants offering delivery. The convenience factor of these products is also proving popular, particularly with millennial consumers. There is speculation this could lead to the rise of the “ghost kitchen” which offers a delivery only service and no physical front of house offering (Phelps, 2018).  


The rise of fast casual

The lines between fast food and full service restaurants are increasingly blurring, leading to the rise of the “fast casual” or “fine-casual” restaurant. These offer a hybrid of the full service and fast food industries, typically combining rapid service with higher quality items, at a lower price than traditional full service dining options. Sales at major US fast-casual chains grew by about 11% in 2015, compared to 5.5% for limited-service establishments and less than 5% for all restaurants (First Research, 2018).


Selling an experience

Due to the high level of substitutes (eating at home, competitor restaurants, food trucks and alternative leisure activities) some restaurants are focusing on marketing the full experience of the meal in order to attract customers and/or increase price points. 


Staff shortages in British Columbia

Of the 2.5 million British Columbians who make up the workforce today, 174,200, or 7.3%, people are directly employed in the restaurant industry. Over the next ten years, BC is looking at a skilled labour shortage of more than 514,000 workers, the result of several factors including demographic shift, low unemployment, skill shortage and kitchen culture.  (BCRFA, 2018)


Technology

The industry is highly dependent on direct labour input across all areas of operation and many of these functions cannot be substituted by technology or machinery. That said, technology can be used to improve internal business processes. 
The most popular current applications are point-of-sale, time and attendance (for employees), customer traffic counter and in-store back office systems, as well as debit and credit card programs, labour scheduling, labour productivity analysis, inventory management, e-mail, food production and kitchen scheduling. (Sayler, 2018)


Bibliography

BC Restaurant and Food Services Association (2018). Metro Vancouver Restaurant Labour Shortage: Report & Recommendations. Retrieved from http://www.bcrfa.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Final-Report-Labour-Shor...

First Research (2018). Restaurants, bars & food services - quarterly update 6/25/2018.  Fort Mill, South Carolina: Mergent. Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Collection; Business Premium Collection 

Lalley, H. (2018). 10 Trends Emerging from Top Growth Chains. Restaurant Business 117(7) pp.41-62

MarketLine (2018). Foodservice in Canada (MarketLine Industry Report). 

Saylor, B (2017). Full-Service Restaurants in Canada (IBISWorld Industry Report 72211CA). IBISWorld Inc. 

Saylor, B (2018). Fast-Food Restaurants in Canada (IBISWorld Industry Report 72211aCA). IBISWorld Inc.  

Phelps, R (2018) Ghost restaurants set to disrupt traditional eatery industry. Financial Post Retrieved from https://business.financialpost.com/entrepreneur/ghost-restaurants-set-to...

Statistics Canada (2018) , Food services and drinking places, September 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/181122/dq181122c-eng.htm

Technomic (2018) Consumers increasingly making food choices based on personal definition of health. Retrieved from https://www.technomic.com/newsroom/consumers-increasingly-making-food-ch...
 

Industry Trends

This industry overview includes the latest statistics and trends for both full service and limited service restaurants. 

  • Full service restaurants, providing food services to patrons who order and are served while seated (i.e., waiter/waitress service) and pay after eating. 
  • Limited service restaurants, which are primarily engaged in providing food services (except snack and non-alcoholic beverage bars) where patrons order and pay before eating. Food and drink may be consumed on premises, taken out, or delivered to the customer's location.  These are also known as fast-service or fast-food restaurants.

For more specific information about researching the restaurant industry, please see our Restaurant Industry Guide

For information about related industries please see our industry guides for Catering, Bakery, Coffee Shop, Bar & Nightclub, Specialty Foods, Street Food Vendor.  


Content


Industry Status

Industry phase: Mature            

Concentration: Low            

Competition: High

Regulation: Medium-High

Barriers to entry: Medium


BC Industry performance snapshot

Sales

  • As of September 2018, BC food services and drinking place sales totalled $1,038,023,000 (Statistics Canada)
  • Sales were up in every province in the third quarter of 2018, with the largest gains in dollar terms in British Columbia, +8.0%. (Statistics Canada)
  • Prices for food purchased from restaurants rose 4.4% year over year in the third quarter. (Statistics Canada) 

Source: Statistics Canada Table 21-10-0019-01 Monthly survey of food services and drinking places (x 1,000)

Source: Statistics Canada Table 21-10-0019-01 Monthly survey of food services and drinking places (x 1,000)


Positive industry indicators

Consumer spending power 

The restaurant industry is affected by disposable income, consumer confidence and levels of unemployment. 

  • Per capita disposable income is forecast to grow at an annualized rate of 2.7% over the next five years, enabling a greater number of Canadian consumers to eat out at industry establishments. 
  • Full service restaurants are also going to be boosted by an anticipated increase in corporate profit and subsequent increase in client entertainment spending. 
  • Consumer spending is projected to continue growing at a steady rate over the five years to 2022, driven by relatively low unemployment and high levels of disposable income. 
  • Strong growth in the number of households earning more than $100,000 per year will lead to greater spending in the industry's high-end segments. 

(Sayler, 2018)


Demand for convenience

Recent social trends, such as busier lifestyles, heavier workloads and longer working hours, have helped boost demand for restaurant services and convenience food, as time-poor consumers look to cut down on cooking times and make better use of their spare time. 


Demographic changes 

The changing age structure of the population influences industry demand. Two broad demographic trends have encouraged industry growth over the past decade. (Sayler, 2018)

  • The baby-boomer generation has access to higher disposable incomes than previous generations, meaning they are more likely to spend on eating out. 
  • Young adults aged between 18 and 30 are delaying marriage and having children later; this enables young consumers to spend a greater proportion of their income on dining out. This millennial age bracket is spending a higher proportion of their food budget eating out than any other age bracket, making them a key target market and driver of change. 


National Growth

Both full and limited service industries have seen moderate growth over the past five years, with growth also predicted for the next five, albeit at a slower rate. 

  • Growth rate - revenue:
Full service     
2013 - 2018 4.1%  
2018 - 2023 2.1%  

 

Limited service   
2012 - 2017 4.5%
2017 - 2022 2.2%

 

  • Growth rate – number of transactions 

Industry consumption volume increased with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 1.8% between 2013 and 2017, to reach a total of 5.7 billion transactions in 2017. The industry's volume is expected to rise to 6.3 billion transactions by the end of 2022, representing a CAGR of 1.9% for the 2017-2022 period. (Marketline, 2018)

  • Growth rate – market value 

In 2017 the Canadian foodservice industry had total revenues of $54.3 billion. By 2022, this is forecast to rise to $63.3 billion, maintaining the same compound annual growth rate as the 2013 - 2017 period of 3.1%. (Marketline, 2018)


Industry challenges

Profit margins under pressure

Profit margins within the industry are generally narrow, and are under increasing pressure from rising food and labour prices. On average limited service restaurants fare better with a profit of 10.4% in 2018 (Sayler, 2018), compared to that of the full service industry at 3.2% in 2017. (Sayler, 2017) 

In 2016 Statistics Canada report that 71.1%% of all restaurants with annual revenue up to $5m are profitable. (Statistics Canada)


Barriers to success

While barriers to entry into the industry are relatively low, barriers to success (i.e. the ability to stay profitable and in operation for more than a few initial years) are relatively high. According to industry sources, about 60.0% of new full service restaurants close or change hands within three years of opening. (Sayler, 2017)


Key success factors 

Whole Industry Full Service Limited Service
  • Access to multiskilled and flexible workforce
  • Having a clear market position
  • Effective cost controls    
  • Proximity to key markets
  • Ensuring pricing policy is appropriate 
  • Business expertise of operators
  • Market research and understanding
  • Ability to franchise operations

Costs

Limited Service Industry (Sayler, 2018)

Graph of fast food restaurant industry costs
 


Full Service Industry (Sayler, 2017)
 


Employment numbers

Reflecting the low concentration within this industry, the vast majority of both full service (92%) and limited service restaurants (95%) in British Columbia have fewer than 49 employees.

Source: Statistics Canada Table  33-10-0092-01 Canadian Business Counts, with employees, June 2018 and Table 33-10-0094-01 Canadian Business Counts, without employees, June 2018  


Trends & changes


Healthy choices

Consumers are increasingly health conscious and searching for businesses that reflect those values. Many limited service restaurants have taken advantage of this trend by shifting menus away from fatty and fried foods to focus on quality products and nutritional value. Full-service restaurants are also adapting to this trend, but higher prices still keep them out of some consumers’ reach. 


Ethical considerations

Consumers are increasingly concerned about what they consume and where their food comes from, resulting in a rising demand for locally sourced, cruelty-free options as well as vegan and vegetarian menus. There are indicators this is fueling a move away from red meat towards poultry and seafood options. 


Off-premise and third party delivery

Third party delivery services have opened up the possibility of a much broader range of restaurants offering delivery. The convenience factor of these products is also proving popular, particularly with millennial consumers. There is speculation this could lead to the rise of the “ghost kitchen” which offers a delivery only service and no physical front of house offering (Phelps, 2018).  


The rise of fast casual

The lines between fast food and full service restaurants are increasingly blurring, leading to the rise of the “fast casual” or “fine-casual” restaurant. These offer a hybrid of the full service and fast food industries, typically combining rapid service with higher quality items, at a lower price than traditional full service dining options. Sales at major US fast-casual chains grew by about 11% in 2015, compared to 5.5% for limited-service establishments and less than 5% for all restaurants (First Research, 2018).


Selling an experience

Due to the high level of substitutes (eating at home, competitor restaurants, food trucks and alternative leisure activities) some restaurants are focusing on marketing the full experience of the meal in order to attract customers and/or increase price points. 


Staff shortages in British Columbia

Of the 2.5 million British Columbians who make up the workforce today, 174,200, or 7.3%, people are directly employed in the restaurant industry. Over the next ten years, BC is looking at a skilled labour shortage of more than 514,000 workers, the result of several factors including demographic shift, low unemployment, skill shortage and kitchen culture.  (BCRFA, 2018)


Technology

The industry is highly dependent on direct labour input across all areas of operation and many of these functions cannot be substituted by technology or machinery. That said, technology can be used to improve internal business processes. 
The most popular current applications are point-of-sale, time and attendance (for employees), customer traffic counter and in-store back office systems, as well as debit and credit card programs, labour scheduling, labour productivity analysis, inventory management, e-mail, food production and kitchen scheduling. (Sayler, 2018)


Bibliography

BC Restaurant and Food Services Association (2018). Metro Vancouver Restaurant Labour Shortage: Report & Recommendations. Retrieved from http://www.bcrfa.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Final-Report-Labour-Shor...

First Research (2018). Restaurants, bars & food services - quarterly update 6/25/2018.  Fort Mill, South Carolina: Mergent. Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Collection; Business Premium Collection 

Lalley, H. (2018). 10 Trends Emerging from Top Growth Chains. Restaurant Business 117(7) pp.41-62

MarketLine (2018). Foodservice in Canada (MarketLine Industry Report). 

Saylor, B (2017). Full-Service Restaurants in Canada (IBISWorld Industry Report 72211CA). IBISWorld Inc. 

Saylor, B (2018). Fast-Food Restaurants in Canada (IBISWorld Industry Report 72211aCA). IBISWorld Inc.  

Phelps, R (2018) Ghost restaurants set to disrupt traditional eatery industry. Financial Post Retrieved from https://business.financialpost.com/entrepreneur/ghost-restaurants-set-to...

Statistics Canada (2018) , Food services and drinking places, September 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/181122/dq181122c-eng.htm

Technomic (2018) Consumers increasingly making food choices based on personal definition of health. Retrieved from https://www.technomic.com/newsroom/consumers-increasingly-making-food-ch...
 

Industry Trends

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE752 .R63 2010
Joseph E. Roach, The Canadian Law of Mortgages, 2d ed. (Markham: LexisNexis, 2010).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE1345 .V36 2018
J. Anthony VanDuzer, The Law of Partnerships and Corporations, 4th ed. (Toronto : Irwin Law, 2018).
Online access: http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=https://www.deslibris.ca/ID/479782

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE2114 .B34 2018
Nathan Baker, Drug-Impaired Driving in Canada (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2018).
Online access: http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=https://www.deslibris.ca/ID/479848

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE3108.5 .L33 2018
Labour Law Casebook Group, Labour and Employment Law: Cases, Materials and Commentary, 9th ed. (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2018).
Online access: http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=https://www.deslibris.ca/ID/479780

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE8809 .R62 2018
Kent Roach, Criminal Law, 7th ed. (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2018).
Online access: http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=https://www.deslibris.ca/ID/479778

Many thanks to guest blogger Karen Ng for contributing the below post! Karen is a graduate student at UBC’s iSchool (School of Library, Archival and Information Studies) and the co-curator of Judging a Book by Its Cover.

Fantastic Books and Where to See Them!

At Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC), I work as a student assistant, and it is both exciting and daunting to learn the collections and holdings. What do we have and what’s interesting about each thing? In searching for books with visually appealing covers that draw our attention, we turned our focus to items that show the progression of bookbinding techniques over time, as well as items that highlight Vancouver’s book arts scene. The exhibition, Judging a Book By Its Cover, showcases items from the following categories: early European bindings; works from local bookbinders and designers; artists’ books and odd formats; examples of the Arts and Crafts Movement; special qualities of bindings that make books unique; and notable and aesthetically beautiful covers.

Some of my favourite items from the exhibit include The WunderCabinet: The Curious Worlds of Barbara Hodgson & Claudia Cohen, The Canned Think, and Le trésor du fidèle. The WunderCabinet is a charming contemporary cabinet of curiosities filled with odd bits and pieces alongside a journal inside the wooden box. The Canned Think, created by Tyrrell Mendis, Joel Matthews, and Jon Matthews, is a cute selection of “poemtry” inside a can. Finally, Le trésor du fidèle is a small book published some time in the 1800s. It lives in a plain little black box, and with a beautifully sculpted ivory cover with engraved initials, it sits in delightful contrast to one of the biggest books in the exhibit, a large music chant manuscript with wonderfully obnoxious metal bosses and clasps.

When nearly all the books on the shelves were beautiful, it was easy to pick out the ones with gold lettering and decorations for display. These books formed our cases that highlighted the Arts and Crafts Movement of the late nineteenth century, when there was an emphasis on aesthetics and the fine arts, which was a response of sorts to the industrial nature of mass-produced books. A major focus in this exhibition is also on the handmade quality of books ranging from medieval manuscripts to artists’ books. At times, it became difficult for me to fully appreciate the work and craftsmanship that went into artists’ books in particular when they looked like a machine had made them, and perhaps that’s the fascinating part about the book.

This exhibition was an exciting opportunity to judge and explore the books in RBSC on a largely superficial level. These books look great and we want you to see them.

The exhibition Judging a Book by Its Cover is free and open to the public at Rare Books and Special Collections through January 4, 2019. The RBSC reading room is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

 

 

UBC alumus Lindsay Wong is getting a lot of attention this fall for her new book The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family. The gut-wrenching and beguiling memoir details Wong’s coming of age in a dysfunctional Asian family whose members blamed their woes on ghosts and demons when in fact they should have been on anti-psychotic meds. Wong’s story is a witty and touching account of the Asian immigrant experience and a harrowing, honest depiction of the vagaries of mental illness. The book was a finalist for the prestigious 2018 Hilary Weston Prize for Non-Fiction.

We spoke with Lindsay about her writing process, her time at UBC’s Creative Writing Program, how she came to find her unmistakable dark, comedic voice as well as her experiences at UBC Library. Spoiler: she was almost hit by lightning in front of the Koerner Library! Read on to learn more.

What inspired you to write your memoir?

I think I fell into memoir, or maybe the genre just grabbed me. Anyway, I blame the sorting hat system in UBC’s Creative Writing Program, where they assign us to classes based on our admissions portfolio. Memoir just felt like a very necessary and painful thing to do (like root canal surgery). Writing the manuscript was a means for me to understand who I was in relation to my family and to make sense of the severe mental illness that surrounded me.

Did you write your memoir for a particular audience?

Mostly, I wrote the memoir for myself, as this would be a book that I would have desperately needed and wanted being CBC (Chinese Born Canadian) growing up in the suburbs of Vancouver.  But I do think that mental illness has never been explicitly addressed in Asian immigrant writing in North America, as it’s such a taboo subject in our culture. I hope all readers, not just Chinese-Canadians, connect to the universal themes of mental illness and dysfunctional family relationships in the book.

Tell us about the statement: “We would eventually learn that we could not run away from ourselves” and why it’s a reoccurring theme throughout the book.

There’s a motif in The Woo-Woo about migration and diaspora and running away. My family flees extreme poverty in Hong Kong, and when they arrive in Canada, they’re always running from ghosts (which represents mental illness and various other issues). My character, too, is always trying to run away from herself, by first running to Honolulu then all the way to New York City. I wanted to show that there was this intergenerational cycle of frenzied physical relocation that almost every member of the family attempts, yet it never works. All the members in my family are always trying to outrun “ghosts”, each other, and themselves. Essentially, the Wongs and their extended kin are trapped.

Can you share how your writing process while at UBC evolved and how your decision to change the tone of your book came about while at Columbia University?

As a younger writer, I was definitely more serious in tone, and I didn’t quite have a sense of humour. I was still finding my voice, and as a writing student, you tend to think that all literary writing has to be serious in order to really matter. When I moved to New York City, there was an emphasis on humour and comedic writing in our workshops, and I think one naturally tends to develop an absurdist point of view in order to survive the subway system in New York City. While I was studying at Columbia, there were also three suicides. It was a difficult and competitive place. Anyway, once I allowed my subconsciousness to flow, I was able to find my voice, and the writing came naturally.

How did you do research for the book? Did UBC Library’s resources inform your work in any way?

I only wrote 1-2 character sketches about my grandmother and my aunt while I was a UBC Creative Writing student, so most of my research was done through phone or in-person interviews. I did not need to use the library’s resources for the memoir at the time. But I did use the printer and photocopier every few days, especially during graduate school application season. I broke the printer at Koerner Library trying to print out my application for Oxford and I was later wait-listed. Does that count as a library resource? (Our answer: Yes, it absolutely does! Learn more about UBC Library’s Pay for Print services.)

Did you have a favourite study spot at UBC Library while you were a student here?

I’d find an empty corner to study at Koerner Library in one of the quiet upper levels or sometimes I’d write my essays in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and drink 3-5 chai lattes in Ike’s cafe. Those lemon poppy seed muffins were addictive. True story: I was almost struck by lightning right outside of Koerner Library!  It was around 10 p.m., I had a first-year Women’s Studies paper due the next day, and I was leaving the library to make the long trek back to Totem Park. All of a sudden, I was blinded by very hot, intense white light and knocked backwards. I landed on my butt a few feet away and my skin and hair felt fried!  It was all very weird and confusing, but then I saw lightning splashing everywhere. I survived.

Follow Lindsay’s writing on her website.

LAW LIBRARY level 3: BF371 .M46 2018
Philippe Tortell, Mark Turin & Margot Young, eds., Memory (Vancouver: Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: HN940.A8 H85 2018
Kamrul Hossain, José Miguel Roncero Martín, Anna Petrétei, eds., Human and Societal Security in the Circumpolar Arctic: Local and Indigenous Communities (Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: HV6049 .P73 1997
John Pratt, Governing the Dangerous: Dangerousness, Law, and Social Change (Sydney: Federation Press, 1997).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: JL65 .C37 2018
John R. Allan et al., eds., Canada: The State of the Federation 2015: Canadian Federalism and Infrastructure (Montréal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K3240 .R4727 2018
Lee McConnell & Rhona Smith, eds., Research Methods in Human Rights (Abingdon: Routledge, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K5001 .A949 2018
Daniele Archibugi & Alice Pease, Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K5261 .I58 2018
Paul H. Cohen & Angela M. Papalaskaris, eds., International Corruption, 2d ed. (London: Sweet & Maxwell/Thomson Reuters, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD758 .C43 1735
Susan Paterson Glover, ed., The Hardships of the English Laws in Relation to Wives by Sarah Chapone (London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2018).
Online access: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=9213557

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD1695 .C43 2017
S.J. Gleeson, Chalmers and Guest on Bills of Exchange, Cheques and Promissory Notes, 18th ed. (London: Sweet & Maxwell/ Thomson Reuters, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD3525 .J36 2017
Mark James, Sports Law, 3d ed. (London: Palgrave, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD4902 .D48 2018
Harry Woolf et al., De Smith’s Judicial Review, 8th ed. (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD7562 .G66 2018
Andrew Goodman, How Judges Decide Cases: Reading, Writing and Analysing Judgments, 2d ed. (London: Wildy, Simmonds & Hill Publishing, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KDC766 .L39 2018
Mark Lazarowicz & Jean McFadden, The Scottish Parliament: Law and Practice (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF5417 .B55 2018
Kandace Bond Wileman et al., Tribunal Practice and Procedure (Toronto: Emond, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF9415 .M56 2017
C.J. Miller & David Perry, eds., Miller on Contempt of Court, 4th ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KU1336 .C65 2018
Shae McCrystal, Breen Creighton & Anthony Forsyth, eds., Collective Bargaining Under the Fair Work Act (Annandale: The Federation Press, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KZ1242 .E675 2015
Valerie Epps & Lorie Graham, International Law, 2d ed. (New York: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business, 2015).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: WM276 .W53 2018
James G. Wigmore, Wigmore on Cannabis: The Forensic Toxicology of Marijuana for Lawyers and Other Medicolegal Professionals (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2018).
Online access: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=9280297

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K5261 .I58 2018
Paul H. Cohen & Angela M. Papalaskaris, eds., International Corruption, 2d ed. (London: Sweet & Maxwell/Thomson Reuters, 2018).

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