“The Fairy Tales of Science” ( PZ6 1866 .B76)

Thank you for joining us for this week’s Friday fairy tales blog post!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’ve been excited to share over the past couple of months the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image”.

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit.

These two will likely be the last student assignment we’ll be sharing through the blog, and we hope you have enjoyed them as much as we have! Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students and stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

“The Bear’s Kingdom” (PZ6 1897 .R644)

Five fairy tale selections, part XII:

 

 

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On June 3rd, 2019, The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls’s Final Report revealed that persistent and deliberate human and Indigenous rights violations and abuses are the root cause behind Canada’s staggering rates of violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA people. In honour of the women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people who continue to go missing and are murdered in Canada and the US, we have put together this list of online resources & books available either freely online or through your UBC CWL login.

Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

The Final Report is comprised of the truths of more than 2,380 family members, survivors of violence, experts and Knowledge Keepers shared over two years of cross-country public hearings and evidence gathering. It delivers 231 individual Calls for Justice directed at governments, institutions, social service providers, industries and all Canadians.

Violence against Indigenous Women: Literature, Activism, Resistance by Allison Hargreaves

Indigenous communities have been organizing against violence since newcomers first arrived, but the cases of missing and murdered womenhave only recently garnered broad public attention. Violence AgainstIndigenous Women joins the conversation by analyzing the socially interventionist work of Indigenous women poets, playwrights, filmmakers, and fiction-writers. Organized as a series of case studies that pair literary interventions with recent sites of activism and policy-critique, the book puts literature in dialogue with anti-violence debate to illuminate new pathways toward action.

Remembering Vancouver’s Disappeared Women: Settler Colonialism and the Difficulty of Inheritance by Amber Dean

In a work driven by the urgency of this ongoing crisis, which extends across the country, Amber Dean offers a timely, critical analysis of the public representations, memorials, and activist strategies that brought the story of Vancouver’s disappeared women to the attention of a wider public. Remembering Vancouver’s Disappeared Women traces “what lives on” from the violent loss of so many women from the same neighbourhood.

Stolen directed by Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs

For the size of their population, Aboriginal women in Canada account for an incredibly overrepresented percentage of missing persons and murder statistics. Sheena, a lost teenager, is placed in a girl’s home. Seemingly forgotten and yearning for a life of freedom, she runs away, only to be picked up by a dangerous stranger. The directorial debut by actor Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs is a sober commentary of missing Indigenous women.

this river directed by Erika MacPherson and Katherena Vermette

This short documentary offers an Indigenous perspective on the devastating experience of searching for a loved one who has disappeared. Volunteer activist Kyle Kematch and award-winning writer Katherena Vermette have both survived this heartbreak and share their histories with each other and the audience. While their stories are different, they both exemplify the beauty, grace, resilience, and activism born out of the need to do something.

For the 2017 pow wow, 17-year-old jingle dancer Tia Wood of Saddle Lake Cree Nation, Alberta was selected as Head Young Lady Dancer. She used that position, and the spotlight it provided in a spectacular way to bring attention to the nearly 1,000 missing and murdered indigenous women from both the United States and Canada.

Looking for more resources? Check out our MMIWG Research Guide updated regularly by our library staff.

In honour of National Indigenous History Month, UBC Education Library is highlighting 5 Indigenous eBook teacher resources available at UBC Library.  All of these professional teacher resources are available as “full text online” to our UBC users by clicking on the images or titles and then “online access” or “full text online” at the catalogue page.


Potlatch as pedagogy: learning through ceremony /Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson

“Inspired by Haida ceremonial practice, father and daughter present a model for learning that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous.”

 


Learning and teaching together: weaving indigenous ways of knowing into education
/ Michelle Tanaka.
“Tanaka recounts how pre-service teachers enrolled in a crosscultural course in British Columbia immersed themselves in indigenous ways of learning and teaching by working alongside indigenous wisdom keepers. Together, they transformed cedar bark, buckskin, and wool into a mural that tells stories about the land upon which the course took place. In the process, they discovered new ways of learning that support not only intellectual but also tactile, emotional, and spiritual forms of knowledge.”

 


Truth and indignation: Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools / Ronald Niezen.
“The original edition of Truth and Indignation offered the first close and critical assessment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) as it was unfolding. Niezen used testimonies, texts, and visual materials produced by the Commission as well as interviews with survivors, priests, and nuns to raise important questions about the TRC process. He asked what the TRC meant for reconciliation, transitional justice, and conceptions of traumatic memory.
In this updated edition, Niezen discusses the Final Report and Calls to Action bringing the book up to date and making it a valuable text for teaching about transitional justice, colonialism and redress, public anthropology, and human rights. Thoughtful, provocative, and uncompromising in the need to tell the “truth” as he sees it, Niezen offers an important contribution to understanding truth and reconciliation processes in general, and the Canadian experience in particular.”

 


Speaking our truth: a journey of reconciliation / Monique Gray Smith
“Canada’s relationship with its Indigenous people has suffered as a result of both the residential school system and the lack of understanding of the historical and current impact of those schools. Healing and repairing that relationship requires education, awareness and increased understanding of the legacy and the impacts still being felt by Survivors and their families. Guided by acclaimed Indigenous author Monique Gray Smith, readers will learn about the lives of Survivors and listen to allies who are putting the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission into action.”

 


Aboriginal worldviews and perspectives in the classroom: Moving forward / BC Ministry of Education
“The past decade has witnessed several significant developments affecting Aboriginal Education in BC. Most visible, perhaps, has been the acknowledgment on the part of both the Province of British Columbia and government of Canada of the mistreatment and disrespect that Aboriginal peoples have endured throughout much of our nation’s history. This has resulted in a new attentiveness on the part of government to long-standing demands from Aboriginal leaders for a fresh approach to the provision of formal education at all levels.”

New browser extension allows for seamless access to UBC Library’s online resources

 

UBC Library users can now use Library Access, a browser extension that provides seamless access to UBC Library subscriptions from anywhere on the web.

The extension, which requires a ‘once only’ installation, automatically detects when users are on a website that contains content the library subscribes to and allows access without having to visit the library website first.

If the content is not accessible, the extension will automatically check for open-access versions.

For Barbara Sobol, Undergraduate Services Librarian at UBCO, the browser extension is making research easier and more intuitive for her students. “For many students, Google is often the most logical place to start,” she says, “This tool prevents them from having to fragment their research between what is accessible through the library and what is available through other sources like government websites etc. It allows them to explore the full scope of sources more easily.”

Library Access is available for most frequently used browsers: Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari and Microsoft Edge. 

Download the Library Access Browser extension.

Visit the Library guide for FAQs and tips for troubleshooting.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to create and deliver responsive collections.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

From “Volʹga” (PZ63.7 .V65 1904)

Happy Friday, and welcome back for this week’s Friday fairy tales blog post!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

From “A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys” (PZ6 1892 .H3)

We hope you enjoy these charming fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part XI:

With the help of local BC business librarians, we have created a new page in our Business Basics section titled COVID-19 & Business Research to help you find credible business information during these uncertain and rapidly changing times. We have listed freely available public resources, as well as databases that may be licensed through local libraries, including here at UBC Library. You will find curated content on the following categories:

  • Key Business Research Starting Places

    Features go-to resources and services that aggregate information about COVID-19 and business.

  • Funding Resources

    An accessible list of various financial resources that have been made available for business during this crisis.

  • Industry Databases with Licensed & Freely Available Content

    A list of databases and tools that are available to the public, as well as through licensed subscriptions. These resources can help you research impacts of the pandemic on industries, consumers and the Canadian economy.

  • Legal Resources

    A variety of legal resources including news, legal updates and Q&As related to COVID-19.

  • Free Educational Opportunities & Professional Development Opportunities

    Free webinars and online courses that business schools have made available in response to the pandemic.

We hope this resource guide is useful to the BC small business community. We invite your comments below to share any questions, feedback or resources with us.

SBA Program News

With the help of local BC business librarians, we have created a new page in our Business Basics section titled COVID-19 & Business Research to help you find credible business information during these uncertain and rapidly changing times. We have listed freely available public resources, as well as databases that may be licensed through local libraries, including here at UBC Library. You will find curated content on the following categories:

  • Key Business Research Starting Places

    Features go-to resources and services that aggregate information about COVID-19 and business.

  • Funding Resources

    An accessible list of various financial resources that have been made available for business during this crisis.

  • Industry Databases with Licensed & Freely Available Content

    A list of databases and tools that are available to the public, as well as through licensed subscriptions. These resources can help you research impacts of the pandemic on industries, consumers and the Canadian economy.

  • Legal Resources

    A variety of legal resources including news, legal updates and Q&As related to COVID-19.

  • Free Educational Opportunities & Professional Development Opportunities

    Free webinars and online courses that business schools have made available in response to the pandemic.

We hope this resource guide is useful to the BC small business community. We invite your comments below to share any questions, feedback or resources with us.

SBA Program News

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