LAW LIBRARY level 3: K380 .B765 2015
John Bronsteen, Christopher Buccafusco & Jonathan S. Masur, Happiness and the Law (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2015).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K3585 .S865 2018
Jocelyn Stacey, The Constitution of the Environmental Emergency (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2018).
Online access: http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/the-constitution-of-the-environmental-emergency/

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE9448 .J65 2016
Brock Jones, Emma Rhodes & Mary Birdsell, Prosecuting and Defending Fraud Cases: A Practitioner’s Handbook (Toronto: Emond Montgomery Publications Limited, 2016).

Thank you for participating the Asian–language book clubs 2018!

This is the second Asian-language book club program after its launch in the fall of 2016. With the support from the Faculty of Arts, we were able to extend the initiative from two to four languages – Korean, Punjabi, Japanese, and Chinese.  All four book clubs took place between January and April.  Each had two sessions, a “meet and greet” session followed by a book discussion about a month later.

Three out of the four books selected for the events are novels written by award-winning writers in Asia, including the Korean novel Chinatown (중국인 거리) by Oh Jung-hee (오 정희), the Japanese work Convenience Store People (コンビニ人間 ) by Murata Sayaka (村田沙耶香), and the Punjabi novel  News from a Village (ਖਬਰ ਇੱਕ ਪਿੰਡ ਦੀ: ਨਾਵਲ) by Pargat Singh Satoj (ਪਰਗਟ ਸਿੰਘ ਸਤੌਜ). The Chinese-language biography A Way of Finding What’s True (寻找苏慧廉) was written by local writer –  by Shen Jia (沈迦). Participants in the Chinese and Korean book clubs had the exciting opportunity to meet and engage with the book author and translators who graciously agreed to facilitate the sessions. The Japanese and Punjabi book club members were joined by UBC graduate students Cyrus and Taranjit to explore their books through structured activities and animated discussions.

The book clubs aimed to provide an opportunity for current students, faculty, alumni, and other interested community members with advanced fluency in Asian-language to form ties with others in their respective literary communities. All four book clubs were well-attended, with 64 participants in total and attracted a wide-range of participants. 39% of attendees were students (12.5% graduate and 26.5% undergraduate), 12.5% faculty,  8% staff, 14% alumni, 11% residents from the UBC neighbourhood, and 15.5% community members unaffiliated with UBC. Some participants were non-native speakers. The diverse backgrounds of the participants contributed to the interesting discussions, which were accompanied by Asian-style refreshments.

In our post-event surveys, a number of participants expressed their desire to see an on-going Asian-language book club program. The Asian Library will continue to explore the possibility. If you are interested in future book club events, or if you have any suggestions on a book club topic, please email to asian.library@ubc.ca.

Korean book club

Punjabi book club

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Japanese book club

Chinese book club

Do you ever wonder what Vancouver was like just a few decades ago? What used to exist where you live or work? If you want information about Greater Vancouver, you can check out our Greater Vancouver Regional District Planning Department Land Use Maps Collection.

The collection has over 1,800 detailed maps—produced in 1965, 1980 and 1983—and covers Vancouver and several surrounding municipalities. You can explore maps of: North and West Vancouver, Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Richmond, Port Moody, Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam, Surrey, Delta, and even the Howe Sound and Bowen Island!

When looking through the maps, you’ll be able to see that symbols were used to indicate what individual lots were used for. In total, there are 64 zoning categories, which indicate whether lots were residential, commercial, industrial, mixed and more.  The maps are used by urban planning and geography students at UBC, the local business community, and property development firms. The originals are held at UBC Library’s Maps & Atlas Collection, but you have access online through Open Collections.

If you want to start exploring the area, check the index to search specifically the map of your interest:

Index – Land use series

 

Development map series: city of Vancouver, 1971

 

Take a look at the map of False Creek. The Vancouver General Hospital remains, but can you see some changes that happened on the last 47 years?

Development map series: city of Vancouver, 1971

 

Access the Greater Vancouver Maps Collection, try to find some places that you frequent today and see what they used to be!

Looking for somewhere to go on this upcoming school professional day? UBC Education Library welcomes children and families on Friday, May 18th to our special “Young Learners Library” lounge area. From 8am to 5pm, room 155, which is usually a computer commons area, will be transformed into a miniature young person’s library.  Find a cozy seat in a soft chair or sit on the sofa with a friend or family member and share a book!

Books will be arranged at tables into the following categories: First Books, Picture/Story Books, Readers, Early Chapter Books. Children’s Novels and Young Adult Novels. Our Makerspace Kits and puppets will also be on display in the lounge and available for borrowing as usual.

 

photo of the kelmscott press' works of geoffrey chaucer being digitized with a scanner camera

When UBC Library acquired the Kelmscott Press’ Works of Geoffrey Chaucer in August 2016, the announcement marked the successful end of a long journey to bring the book to UBC, but the book’s preservation story was just beginning.

Printed by William Morris’ Kelmscott Press in 1896, as part of a limited run of 438 copies, the book took Morris four years to design, thanks to the many elaborate illustrations and decorative borders that populate its pages. Now as one of UBC’s most valuable holdings at Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC), the book is an incredible resource for researchers and students with an interest in historic literature and the art of book design.

For UBC’s Digital Initiatives team, it was important to preserve the beauty bound in the book’s pages in a digital format to create even wider access. Digitizing the Kelmscott Chaucer was challenging because the book is tightly bound and has small gutters (the blank spaces surrounding a book’s type area). A scanner with a top-notch digital camera back was used to capture the intricate detailing on each page.

With the digitization complete, the book is now available to read online, as a treasured addition to UBC Library’s Open Collections. To celebrate the occasion, UBC Library has created a free digital colouring book, featuring 25 beautiful illustrations from Kelmscott’s Chaucer.

Download your copy of UBC Library’s Kelmscott Chaucer Digital Colouring Book and check out more photos from the digitizing process on Flickr.

One-on-One is an ongoing series aimed at getting ‘behind the scenes’ with senior leadership at UBC.

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) University library members has recently released 2016-17 expenditure data for the subscriptions licensed through the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) consortium.  Among other things, CRKN works on behalf of member institutions to leverage collective bargaining power when negotiating with library vendors for access to research materials – including databases and journals.

The publication of this data set demonstrates a clear commitment to transparency surrounding licensing expenditures for Canadian research libraries, something that CARL and member institutions have long advocated for. According to the CARL press release, “As publicly funded institutions, research libraries recognize that it is in the public’s interest that they provide maximum transparency about the costs and license information of the contractual arrangements for information resources and services into which they enter.”

Data on UBC expenditures through CRKN is included in the published data set and provides readers with some insights into the costs of UBC licensed resources. It is worth noting that UBC provides access to many more resources than those listed among the data set, but subscriptions are negotiated individually or with other consortia.

To see the data set and read the accompanying documentation refer to the links provided in the CARL press release.

Introduction

A florist shop is a retail establishment that sells cut flowers and ornamental plants. The floral trade involves activities such as flower care, flower arranging, floral design, merchandising, and often flower delivery. Florist shops are an ever popular industry. As such, we want to provide you with snapshots of the current industry overview, trends and challenges as well as provide some research resources for those interested in the florist shop business.

Canada

  • There are 3,143 florists in Canada or 8.94 per 100,000 population.
  • “Prince Edward Island (10.50) and Ontario (9.51) have the most florist shops per 100,000 population.”
  • “Nova Scotia (6.39) and New Brunswick (7.63) have the least florist shops per 100,000 population.”

Note. Source(s): CANSIM tables 552-007, 553-007 and the Data tables, 2016 Census

Number of Miscellaneous Retail Stores and Florists by Province and Territory 

The table below shows that out of all the provinces, Manitoba (12.81%), Quebec (12.53%), Alberta (12.11%), and Saskatchewan (12.04%) have the highest percentages of their Miscellaneous Retail Stores being Flower Shops in 2017, and the Yukon (4.08%), Nunavut (7.14%), and Nova Scotia (7.14%) have the lowest percentages.

Province / Territory Miscellaneous Retail Stores Florists Percentage of Miscellaneous Retail Stores that are Flower Shops
Newfoundland and Labrador 372 44 11.83%
Prince Edward Island 159 15 9.43%
Nova Scotia 826 59 7.14%
New Brunswick 543 57 10.50%
Quebec 5,892 738 12.53%
Ontario 10,862 1,279 11.77%
Manitoba 773 99 12.81%
Saskatchewan 739 89 12.04%
Alberta 2,931 355 12.11%
British Columbia 4,357 403 9.25%
Yukon 49 2 4.08%
Northwest Territories  26 2 7.69%
Nunavut 14 1 7.14%

Note. Source(s): CANSIM tables 552-007, 553-007 and the Data tables, 2016 Census

The table below shows the breakdown between employer and non-employer or indeterminate establishments for the provinces with the highest number in each category in 2016. In the Florist Industry 1,450 of the establishments were non-employers or indeterminate and 1,734 had one or more employees. Ontario, Quebec, Alberta and British Columbia had the highest number of employers and non-employers/indeterminate as shown in the table below. More information can be found by clicking on the source link below the table.

Establishments by employment type and province / territory / country (2016)
Province / Territory / Country  Employers Non-employers / Indeterminate 
Ontario 639 640
Quebec 389 358
Alberta 235 128
British Columbia 216 193
Canada 1,734 1,450

Note. Source: Businesses – Canadian Industry Statistics

"In 2016, the breakdown of employer establishments in [the florist] industry was as follows: 65.7% of them were considered micro, employing less than five employees; small establishments accounted for 34.3%; and medium-sized establishments accounted for an additional 0.1% of the total number of establishments. Large employers, those with more than five hundred persons on payroll, accounted for 0% of the total establishments" (Canadian Industry Statistics, 2018).

Based on Canadian Industry Statistics from 2016, 65.7% of the employer establishments in Canada fall within the micro employee size category (i.e. 1-4 employees), and 34.3% fall within the small employee size category (i.e. 5-99 employees).  More information about employer establishments by employer size category (i.e. micro, small, medium, large) by province/territory in Canada from 2016 can be found at Businesses – Canadian Industry Statistics.

According to 2016 Canadian Industry Statistics for the florist industry, the average revenue of incorporated businesses with a revenue range of $30,000 to $5,000,000 was $273.4 thousands of dollars; and 72.5% of businesses were profitable.

British Columbia

Based on the preceding section regarding Canadian data above, this next section will list the statistics that are relevant to British Columbia.

  • In 2016, there were 8.67 flower shops per 100,000 population in BC. This makes it the fourth highest province in Canada in terms of the number of flower shops per 100,000 population by province/territory (see chart above).
  • In 2016, 9.25% of the Miscellaneous Retail Stores in BC were flower shops (see table above). 
  • In 2016, 216 of the establishments by employer type were employers, and 193 were non-employer/indeterminate. This makes it the fourth province with the highest number of employers and non-employer/indeterminate (see table above).
  • In 2016, there were 140 micro employer establishments (i.e. 1-4 employees) in BC, and 76 small employer establishments (i.e. 5-99 employees) in BC. This makes BC the fourth highest province with employer micro and small establishments (Canadian Industry Statistics, 2018).

Industry Trends and Challenges                                           

According to a Florists-Canadian Market Research Report by IBIS World in 2017, the industry revenue has declined over the last five years due to external competition from retailers that are not included in the florist industry, such as e-commerce stores and supermarkets. It is suggested that consumers prefer the convenience and the lower prices that these alternative retailers have to offer. This report also suggests that “Improving economic conditions will encourage consumers to purchase more discretionary items (IBIS World, 2017).”

The most important success factors for the Florist Industry identified in the IBIS World report include:

  • Effective quality control
  • Ability to control stock on hand
  • Ability to attract local support/patronage

To learn more about florist industry performance, outlook, products and markets, competitive landscape, major companies, operating conditions, and key statistics, view the full IBIS World Industry Report 45311CA – Florists in Canada

Below are some resources to help you get started on your business research.

Associations

Flowers Canada Growers

Fairtrade Canada

Society of American Florists (SAF)

OFA – An Association of Floriculture Professionals

Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers

Magazines & Trade Journals

Canadian Florist Magazine

Flower Magazine

Fusion Flowers Magazine

Florist Review Magazine

Directories

Frasers

Canada One – Canadian Business Directory

ThomasNet

Federal Corporations Data Online

Hoovers

>> See latest flower industry – design shows, conferences, conventions, trade shows and educational sessions.

Additional Resources

If you would like to access more resources, the Florist Shop Guide is designed to help prospective and existing wedding business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics, it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why it is important.

References

Cohen, A. (2017). IBISWorld Industry Report 45311CA Florists in Canada. IBIS World. Retrieved from http://clients1.ibisworld.ca/reports/ca/industry/default.aspx?entid=1096

Government of Canada. (2018). Businesses - Canadian Industry Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/45311

Government of Canada. (2018). Summary - Canadian Industry Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/summary-sommaire/45311;jsessionid=0001pDILXxn8unBkBZrEl2pt5Qg:-803S94https:/www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/summary-sommaire/45311;jsessionid=0001pDILXxn8unBkBZrEl2pt5Qg:-803S94

Statistics Canada. (2016). Data tables, 2016 Census. Census of Population, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-400-X2016001. Retrieved from http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/dt-td/Rp-eng.cfm?LANG=E&APATH=3&DETAIL=0&DIM=0&FL=A&FREE=0&GC=0&GID=0&GK=0&GRP=1&PID=109523&PRID=10&PTYPE=109445&S=0&SHOWALL=0&SUB=0&Temporal=2016&THEME=115&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=

Statistics Canada. (2018). Table 552-0007 Canadian business counts, location counts with employees, by employment size and North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), Canada and provinces, December 2017. Retrieved from http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&retrLang=eng&id=5520007&pattern=Canadian+business+counts&csid=

Statistics Canada. (2018). Table 553-0007 Canadian business counts, location counts without employees, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), Canada and provinces, December 2017. Retrieved from http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&retrLang=eng&id=5530007&pattern=florists&csid=

 

Industry Trends

Introduction

A florist shop is a retail establishment that sells cut flowers and ornamental plants. The floral trade involves activities such as flower care, flower arranging, floral design, merchandising, and often flower delivery. Florist shops are an ever popular industry. As such, we want to provide you with snapshots of the current industry overview, trends and challenges as well as provide some research resources for those interested in the florist shop business.

Canada

  • There are 3,143 florists in Canada or 8.94 per 100,000 population.
  • “Prince Edward Island (10.50) and Ontario (9.51) have the most florist shops per 100,000 population.”
  • “Nova Scotia (6.39) and New Brunswick (7.63) have the least florist shops per 100,000 population.”

Note. Source(s): CANSIM tables 552-007, 553-007 and the Data tables, 2016 Census

Number of Miscellaneous Retail Stores and Florists by Province and Territory 

The table below shows that out of all the provinces, Manitoba (12.81%), Quebec (12.53%), Alberta (12.11%), and Saskatchewan (12.04%) have the highest percentages of their Miscellaneous Retail Stores being Flower Shops in 2017, and the Yukon (4.08%), Nunavut (7.14%), and Nova Scotia (7.14%) have the lowest percentages.

Province / Territory Miscellaneous Retail Stores Florists Percentage of Miscellaneous Retail Stores that are Flower Shops
Newfoundland and Labrador 372 44 11.83%
Prince Edward Island 159 15 9.43%
Nova Scotia 826 59 7.14%
New Brunswick 543 57 10.50%
Quebec 5,892 738 12.53%
Ontario 10,862 1,279 11.77%
Manitoba 773 99 12.81%
Saskatchewan 739 89 12.04%
Alberta 2,931 355 12.11%
British Columbia 4,357 403 9.25%
Yukon 49 2 4.08%
Northwest Territories  26 2 7.69%
Nunavut 14 1 7.14%

Note. Source(s): CANSIM tables 552-007, 553-007 and the Data tables, 2016 Census

The table below shows the breakdown between employer and non-employer or indeterminate establishments for the provinces with the highest number in each category in 2016. In the Florist Industry 1,450 of the establishments were non-employers or indeterminate and 1,734 had one or more employees. Ontario, Quebec, Alberta and British Columbia had the highest number of employers and non-employers/indeterminate as shown in the table below. More information can be found by clicking on the source link below the table.

Establishments by employment type and province / territory / country (2016)
Province / Territory / Country  Employers Non-employers / Indeterminate 
Ontario 639 640
Quebec 389 358
Alberta 235 128
British Columbia 216 193
Canada 1,734 1,450

Note. Source: Businesses – Canadian Industry Statistics

"In 2016, the breakdown of employer establishments in [the florist] industry was as follows: 65.7% of them were considered micro, employing less than five employees; small establishments accounted for 34.3%; and medium-sized establishments accounted for an additional 0.1% of the total number of establishments. Large employers, those with more than five hundred persons on payroll, accounted for 0% of the total establishments" (Canadian Industry Statistics, 2018).

Based on Canadian Industry Statistics from 2016, 65.7% of the employer establishments in Canada fall within the micro employee size category (i.e. 1-4 employees), and 34.3% fall within the small employee size category (i.e. 5-99 employees).  More information about employer establishments by employer size category (i.e. micro, small, medium, large) by province/territory in Canada from 2016 can be found at Businesses – Canadian Industry Statistics.

According to 2016 Canadian Industry Statistics for the florist industry, the average revenue of incorporated businesses with a revenue range of $30,000 to $5,000,000 was $273.4 thousands of dollars; and 72.5% of businesses were profitable.

British Columbia

Based on the preceding section regarding Canadian data above, this next section will list the statistics that are relevant to British Columbia.

  • In 2016, there were 8.67 flower shops per 100,000 population in BC. This makes it the fourth highest province in Canada in terms of the number of flower shops per 100,000 population by province/territory (see chart above).
  • In 2016, 9.25% of the Miscellaneous Retail Stores in BC were flower shops (see table above). 
  • In 2016, 216 of the establishments by employer type were employers, and 193 were non-employer/indeterminate. This makes it the fourth province with the highest number of employers and non-employer/indeterminate (see table above).
  • In 2016, there were 140 micro employer establishments (i.e. 1-4 employees) in BC, and 76 small employer establishments (i.e. 5-99 employees) in BC. This makes BC the fourth highest province with employer micro and small establishments (Canadian Industry Statistics, 2018).

Industry Trends and Challenges                                           

According to a Florists-Canadian Market Research Report by IBIS World in 2017, the industry revenue has declined over the last five years due to external competition from retailers that are not included in the florist industry, such as e-commerce stores and supermarkets. It is suggested that consumers prefer the convenience and the lower prices that these alternative retailers have to offer. This report also suggests that “Improving economic conditions will encourage consumers to purchase more discretionary items (IBIS World, 2017).”

The most important success factors for the Florist Industry identified in the IBIS World report include:

  • Effective quality control
  • Ability to control stock on hand
  • Ability to attract local support/patronage

To learn more about florist industry performance, outlook, products and markets, competitive landscape, major companies, operating conditions, and key statistics, view the full IBIS World Industry Report 45311CA – Florists in Canada

Below are some resources to help you get started on your business research.

Associations

Flowers Canada Growers

Fairtrade Canada

Society of American Florists (SAF)

OFA – An Association of Floriculture Professionals

Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers

Magazines & Trade Journals

Canadian Florist Magazine

Flower Magazine

Fusion Flowers Magazine

Florist Review Magazine

Directories

Frasers

Canada One – Canadian Business Directory

ThomasNet

Federal Corporations Data Online

Hoovers

>> See latest flower industry – design shows, conferences, conventions, trade shows and educational sessions.

Additional Resources

If you would like to access more resources, the Florist Shop Guide is designed to help prospective and existing wedding business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics, it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why it is important.

References

Cohen, A. (2017). IBISWorld Industry Report 45311CA Florists in Canada. IBIS World. Retrieved from http://clients1.ibisworld.ca/reports/ca/industry/default.aspx?entid=1096

Government of Canada. (2018). Businesses - Canadian Industry Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/45311

Government of Canada. (2018). Summary - Canadian Industry Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/summary-sommaire/45311;jsessionid=0001pDILXxn8unBkBZrEl2pt5Qg:-803S94https:/www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/summary-sommaire/45311;jsessionid=0001pDILXxn8unBkBZrEl2pt5Qg:-803S94

Statistics Canada. (2016). Data tables, 2016 Census. Census of Population, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98-400-X2016001. Retrieved from http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/dt-td/Rp-eng.cfm?LANG=E&APATH=3&DETAIL=0&DIM=0&FL=A&FREE=0&GC=0&GID=0&GK=0&GRP=1&PID=109523&PRID=10&PTYPE=109445&S=0&SHOWALL=0&SUB=0&Temporal=2016&THEME=115&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=

Statistics Canada. (2018). Table 552-0007 Canadian business counts, location counts with employees, by employment size and North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), Canada and provinces, December 2017. Retrieved from http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&retrLang=eng&id=5520007&pattern=Canadian+business+counts&csid=

Statistics Canada. (2018). Table 553-0007 Canadian business counts, location counts without employees, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), Canada and provinces, December 2017. Retrieved from http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&retrLang=eng&id=5530007&pattern=florists&csid=

 

Industry Trends

JAPANESE-LANGUAGE MATERIALS

BQ8912.9 J3 K66 2017
神と仏の日本文化 : 遍照の宝鑰 / 小峰彌彦

CT203 J3 S84 2017
異名・ニックネーム辞典 / 杉村喜光編著

DS822.5 O34448 2017
くらべる時代 : 昭和と平成 / おかべたかし文 ; 山出高士写真

DS869 S245 S26 2017
真田信之 / 黒田基樹編著

DS881.3 I259 2017
明治維新とは何だったのか : 薩長抗争史から「史実」を読み直す / 一坂太郎著

HN723.5 K258 2017 v.1-2
声なき人々の戦後史 / 鎌田慧 ; 聞き手出河雅彦

HQ759.9 A53 2017
祖父母であること : 戦後日本の人口・家族変動のなかで/ 安藤究著

JQ1698 A1 T49 2017
近現代日本における政党支持基盤の形成と変容 : 「憲政常道」から「五十五年体制」へ / 手塚雄太著

NK1175 S25 2017
最新現代デザイン事典 / 監修勝井三雄, 田中一光, 向井周太郎 ; 編集委員伊東順二, 柏木博

NK1484 A1 M868 2017
清水三年坂美術館村田理如コレクション, 明治工芸入門 / 村田理如

PL865 O715 Z758 2017
吉本隆明と中上健次 / 三上治

PN1998.2 H545 2017
「昭和」の子役 : もうひとつの日本映画史 / 樋口尚文

PN6790 J3 M3625 2017
マンガ・アニメで論文・レポートを書く : 「好き」を学問にする方法 / 山田奨治編著

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