The Book of Odds is an online statistical encyclopedia which will launch October 14, 2009.  Although not specifically  about government publications the topics do include statistics about politics as well as health, accidents, and relationships.  Here are some examples:

  • The average American is more likely to live without ever visiting a dentist than to live without a TV in her home.
  • A married man is about as likely to cheat on his wife as he is to experience a flight delay.

From the New York Times:  “The Book of Odds is a searchable online database of “odds statements,” the probabilities of everyday life. You can search it by keyword or by the odds themselves— for instance, how many things stand a 1 in 142 chance of happening to to you. As a special treat for Freakonomics readers, you can try the beta version of the site by clicking here and entering the username “brownian” and password “motion.”… Some of the items you’ll find include:

Read the full NYT article here

KE4454 .W67 2009 (LC)
Continuing Legal Education Society of British Columbia, Working Your Way Into Canada 2009: Materials Prepared for the Continuing Legal Education Seminar, Working Your Way Into Canada 2009 Held in Vancouver, BC, September 16, 2009 (Vancouver: Continuing Legal Education Society of British Columbia, 2009).

KE7709 .A73 2009 (LC) Law Reserve
Maria Morellato, ed., Aboriginal Law Since Delgamuukw (Aurora: Canada Law Book, 2009).

KE8585 .B76 2009 (LC) Law Reserve
Donald J.M. Brown, Civil Appeals (Toronto: Canvasback Pub., 2009).

KEB257 .C64 2009 (LC)
Continuing Legal Education Society of British Columbia, Commercial Litigation, 2009: Materials Prepared for the Continuing Legal Education Seminar, Commercial Litigation, 2009, Held in Vancouver, BC, on September 10, 2009, (Vancouver: Continuing Legal Education Society of British Columbia, 2009).

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