*EZproxy working for this collection now. Clear browser’s cache & cookies and link away*

Linking to the ALPSP Learned Journals Collection from our ejournal A-Z list or via SFX (our OpenURL resolver) is leading to an error message some thing like…

To allow http://www.swetswise.com/link/access_db?issn=1387-2877 to be used in a starting point URL, your EZproxy administrator must first authorize the hostname of this URL in the config.txt file.

Within this database’s section of config.txt, either the following line must be added:

Host www.swetswise.com

====================

We are looking into the problem. To get around this error on campus only, you can cut & paste whichever URL appears after the “To allow” (at the start of the message). Stay tuned.

The UBC Library has paid for online access to this book through Synthesis. UBC students, faculty and staff can access it at this link: http://www.morganclaypool.com/doi/abs/10.2200/S00308ED1V01Y201011VIS001

Every two weeks, Rare Books and Special Collections is featuring a historic document based on a B.C. place name used in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.  Our third featured B.C. place is the Nimpkish area.  The community of Nimpkish is on the end of Nimpkish Lake, on the northern part of Vancouver Island.  An area known for forestry (as part of the North island Central Coast Forest District), it is also the home of the Nimpkish Lake Provincial Park, and the traditional territory of the ‘Namgis First Nation.

The document shown comes from the Yorkshire Trust Company fonds, and the files from this collection show the establishment of the Nimpkish Lake Logging Company in the early 20th century.  The files contain minutes and correspondence regarding shares and timber leases.

Nimpkish Lake Logging Company document

From the Yorkshire Trust Company fonds, file 2-28

The Yorkshire Trust Company was based in England, but established an office in Vancouver in 1880. Being one of the first financial companies to operate in British Columbia, its records include valuable historical information on a variety of early British Columbia businesses.  These records are available for consultation in the Rare Books and Special Collections division of the library.

In the Barber Centre, the Nimpkish Study Area is room 387, and is part of the Science One and Arts One area on the third floor.

Entry to Science One and Arts One

Entry to Science One and Arts One

Every two weeks, Rare Books and Special Collections is featuring a historic document based on a B.C. place name used in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.  Our third featured B.C. place is the Nimpkish area.  The community of Nimpkish is on the end of Nimpkish Lake, on the northern part of Vancouver Island.  An area known for forestry (as part of the North island Central Coast Forest District), it is also the home of the Nimpkish Lake Provincial Park, and the traditional territory of the ‘Namgis First Nation.

The document shown comes from the Yorkshire Trust Company fonds, and the files from this collection show the establishment of the Nimpkish Lake Logging Company in the early 20th century.  The files contain minutes and correspondence regarding shares and timber leases.

Nimpkish Lake Logging Company document

From the Yorkshire Trust Company fonds, file 2-28

The Yorkshire Trust Company was based in England, but established an office in Vancouver in 1880. Being one of the first financial companies to operate in British Columbia, its records include valuable historical information on a variety of early British Columbia businesses.  These records are available for consultation in the Rare Books and Special Collections division of the library.

In the Barber Centre, the Nimpkish Study Area is room 387, and is part of the Science One and Arts One area on the third floor.

Entry to Science One and Arts One

Entry to Science One and Arts One

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