Have you heard the news? There are two new EOS collections in cIRcle!

Two collections, recruited by Kevin Lindstrom, Liaison Librarian for Earth and Ocean Science, include Earth and Ocean Sciences undergraduate honours theses and Environmental Science undergraduate papers and reports. These collections highlight student-driven research, with topics including the impact of commercial shipping noise on killer whales, waste management strategies for Metro Vancouver and gas shale permeability measurements.

You can see more details about these collections in cIRcle by visiting the Earth and Ocean Sciences community in cIRcle.

To read the rest of this article, check out the Library’s July LibFOCUS enewsletter issue to be released next week.

Did You Know?

Currently, there are over 700 EOS theses and dissertations as well as research papers and materials in cIRcle. To browse some of these items, click on ‘Issue Date’ under ‘This Community’.

Above excerpt in italics is courtesy of the Support UBC Library website

Above image is courtesy of the UBC Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences website

Or Dominion Day, as it was formerly known. In this photograph from RBSC’s BC Historical Photograph Collection, “Miss Canada” contestants are being driven through North Vancouver, on July 1 1918.

Miss Canada Contest, 1918

Miss Canada Contest, 1918

A reminder that all UBC Library branches (including RBSC, University Archives and the Chung Collection) are closed for Canada Day on July 1st.

For information on our historical photograph collections, check out our Research Guide for Historical Photos.

Please note that the library will close at 5pm today (June 30th, 2011). We apologize for any inconvenience.

The library is closed tomorrow for Canada Day and will reopen at noon on Saturday, July 2.

cIRcle is an Information Repository (or institutional repository) for published and unpublished materials created by the University of British Columbia.

 

Earth sciences researchers can now access and explore more relevant research thanks to cIRcle, UBC’s institutional repository.

cIRcle is the University of British Columbia’s digital repository for research and teaching materials created by the UBC community and its partners. With more than 34,000 items freely accessible to anyone on the web, cIRcle offers continued access for current and future users.

Through its liaison librarians, UBC Library recruits material for cIRcle, such as undergraduate honours theses and research reports. These efforts have paid off, resulting in large communities of research.

Two collections, recruited by Kevin Lindstrom, Liaison Librarian for Earth and Ocean Science, include Earth and Ocean Sciences undergraduate honours theses and Environmental Science undergraduate papers and reports. These collections highlight student-driven research, with topics including the impact of commercial shipping noise on killer whales, waste management strategies for Metro Vancouver and gas shale permeability measurements.

To access to these studies, simply go to the Earth and Ocean Sciences community in cIRcle.

Other items can be deposited into cIRcle, such as preprints and postprints of academic journal articles, departmental publications, technical reports, bulletins, conference proceedings, course notes and other learning materials. For more information on cIRcle visit its website.

Impact, a new teacher evaluation system currently being used in Washington combines emphasis on classroom observations and student test scores to assess how well students are being taught. To read the full article, published by the New York Times, click here.

27 June 2011: From the Press Release: http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/News/Media-office/Press-releases/2011/WTVM051897.htm “The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Max Planck Society and the Wellcome Trust announced today that they are to support a new, top-tier, open access journal for biomedical and life sciences research. The three organisations aim to establish a new journal that will attract and define the [...]

Last evening, the B.C. Teachers’ Federation (BCTF) won a strike mandate from its members, with limited job action expected to start Sept. 6 when schools re-open. Of those who cast ballots, 90 per cent voted in favour of a strike if there is no progress in contract talks over the summer. Click here to read the full post on Janet Steffenhagen’s blog.

Interestingly, many of the group study rooms in the Irving K Barber Learning Centre are named after rivers in British Columbia. Room 416, a group study room on the fourth floor of the Barber Centre, is named after the Muskwa River, a river that runs 257 kilometres through northern British Columbia. The Muskwa River, a major tributary of the Fort Nelson River, flows east and north to merge with the Prophet River, before joining the Fort Nelson River.

Using some of the place name resources mentioned in the previous blog post on Keremeos, we are able to trace the different names that have been applied to the Muskwa River throughout the years; the “official” name of the river has changed a number of times since the beginning of the 20th century.

According to BC Geographical Names , on Gotfred Emile Jorgensen’s 1895 Map of the Province of British Columbia, it was labeled the “Sicannie River.” The Sikanni (Sekani) people, “dwellers of the rocks,” traded, hunted and lived near the river for hundreds of years. To read more about the history of the Sekani people of British Columbia, you may wish to read Sekani Indians of British Columbia, by Diamond Jenness.

However, what is now called the Muskwa River was labelled “Sikanni River” on BC Land’s map 1A, 1912 and then, in 1917, labeled the “Musqua River” on BC map 1H. It seems that there is some disagreement as to why the river was finally given the name Muskwa. According to George Philip Vernon and Helen Akrigg’s British Columbia Place Names, Muskwa is the Cree word for “bear.” Described by BC BookWorld as “self publishing pioneers”, the Akriggs first published their “landmark’ 1001 British Columbia Place Names in 1969; many editions followed through the years.

Other researchers believe that since the “custom apparently is for a separate band of the Sikanni Indians to hunt on [one and only one] of these rivers, […] the rivers receive the names of the leaders in each band…..thus Musquah’s River, Prophet’s River, Sikanni Chief’s River and Fantasque’s River” (BC Geographical Names http://archive.ilmb.gov.bc.ca/bcgn-bin/bcg10?name=8364).

Tracing the history of the name of the Muskwa River is a good reminder that one should consult multiple sources when doing research!

Geoff Johnson, a former school superintendent suggests that universities and school districts should collaborate with the government to reinstate internship programs within the teaching profession. Click here to read the full article.

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