The B.C. government is proposing significant changes to the education system that it says would help public schools move from good to great.

But the B.C. Teachers’ Federation (BCTF) says the government’s plan is really an attempt to strip teachers of professional autonomy, seniority rights and due process.

To read the entire Vancouver Sun article, click here.

Opera enthusiasts will be delighted to know that we have access to Opera in Video (Alexander Street Press). This resource currently contains 260 videos, including important opera performances, captured on video through staged productions, interviews, and documentaries.

You can also view these videos on your iPhone (3G network or better) and Android. Click on the mobile phone icon next to each video in the database to stream directly to your mobile device!

June 21st not only marks the beginning of the Summer Solstice but it also means today is National Aboriginal Day in Canada.

Some 15 years ago Governor General Romeo LeBlanc declared June 21st as National Aboriginal Day to honor and celebrate Canada’s Indians, Inuit and Métis. That particular day was chosen because of the cultural significance of the summer solstice in aboriginal cultures. National Aboriginal Day has become a day for all Canadians to celebrate the cultures and contributions to Canada of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples and aims to bring about awareness to the rest of Canadian society, in all aspects of art, music, oral history and traditional games.

In celebration of National Aboriginal Day, you can find numerous Aboriginal-related items including historical and current UBC theses and dissertations in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository! See below for more details.

Did You Know?

Currently, there are about 1,980 Aboriginal-related items in cIRcle. To find them, go to the Advanced Search screen in cIRcle and type ‘Aboriginal’ into the ‘Search for’ box.

Above excerpt in italics and image are courtesy of the Summer Solstice / National Aboriginal Day webpage

June 21st not only marks the beginning of the Summer Solstice but it also means today is National Aboriginal Day in Canada.

Some 15 years ago Governor General Romeo LeBlanc declared June 21st as National Aboriginal Day to honor and celebrate Canada’s Indians, Inuit and Métis. That particular day was chosen because of the cultural significance of the summer solstice in aboriginal cultures. National Aboriginal Day has become a day for all Canadians to celebrate the cultures and contributions to Canada of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples and aims to bring about awareness to the rest of Canadian society, in all aspects of art, music, oral history and traditional games.

In celebration of National Aboriginal Day, you can find numerous Aboriginal-related items including historical and current UBC theses and dissertations in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository! See below for more details.

Did You Know?

Currently, there are about 1,980 Aboriginal-related items in cIRcle. To find them, go to the Advanced Search screen in cIRcle and type ‘Aboriginal’ into the ‘Search for’ box.

Above excerpt in italics and image are courtesy of the Summer Solstice / National Aboriginal Day webpage

Jan Wallace, Head of the David Lam Library, at the Canaccord Learning Commons

Students from UBC’s Sauder School of Business have flocked to the new Canaccord Learning Commons (CLC) since it opened in February. The CLC, which is Canada’s first dedicated learning commons within a business school, was made possible through a $1.5- million donation from Vancouver’s Canaccord Financial Inc. It’s an excellent example of UBC Library’s desire to enhance student learning by providing top-notch services and space for learning and research.

“When the students came through the door, we felt really emotional,” recalls Jan Wallace, Head of the David Lam Library, which makes up part of the Commons. “We were overjoyed to see them back again.”

Highlights include bookable study rooms with white boards and LCD screens, quiet and collaborative study areas, breakout rooms for tutoring and workshops that feature LCD screens and laptop hook-ups, a reading lounge that boasts magazine and book displays, print and PC workstations (some with dual monitors for finance students), reference and technology support, and a pending digital media studio. A Speaker Series has featured Josh Klein (co-author of Hacking Work) and former Premier Gordon Campbell, and more events are planned.

“People come here to interact – with technology, with librarians and with each other,” Wallace says. “It’s all meant to make the resources we have more accessible to the students. It’s really the natural evolution of the library.”

The CLC is the product of a partnership between the Lam Library, the Hari B. Varshney Business Career Centre, the Sauder Undergraduate Office, the MBA office, and Sauder’s Learning and Technology Services unit.

For more information, please visit http://learningcommons.sauder.ubc.ca

This story first appeared in the UBC Library Community Report. To read the entire report, click here.

An exhibition of UBC Library items related to the American Civil War is now on display at Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC).

April 12, 2011 marked the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. The first major battle took place in July 1861, and for four years war the Union (North) and Confederate (South) states waged war. The Union emerged victorious, with the abolition of slavery being one of the major outcomes. But the human cost was staggering. In total, more than 600,000 soldiers lost their lives, including nearly 40,000 African-American Union soldiers. At least 50,000 civilians are estimated to have died and another 200,000 to have become refugees.

Despite Britain’s official neutrality, its colonies north of the U.S. border were significantly affected by the war, and even played a role in causing it. The “Underground Railroad” had operated for many years before the war began. Less known is that more than 30,000 British North Americans fought in the conflict, primarily for the North. The war also played a role in the drive for Canadian Confederation.

Items in the RBSC exhibition include letters (one from a former Union General to a former Confederate General regarding the Battle of Gettysburg, and another from the widow of Robert E. Lee), maps, a photo album, a song book, a daily diary mentioning significant events during the war and more.

Rare Books and Special Collections is located on level one of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

The above image is of President Lincoln and General Grant. University of British Columbia Library, E457.52 M87 (Lincoln) and RBSC ARC 1570 (Grant).

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