LexisNexis Quicklaw & Westlaw Canada (Part of the Law – Commercial Databases Training Sessions) • Registration is required – please click on the appropriate link below to sign up • Please have your IDs and passwords before attending sessions (for Westlaw Canada & LexisNexis Quicklaw) • Location: UBC Law Library Meeting & Teaching Room 208 [...]

The Vancouver School Board could launch a year-round school pilot project at several city schools as early as 2012/13, according to superintendent Steve Cardwell. Last year, trustees asked the district’s calendar committee to examine if educational advantages exist in having what’s known as a balanced calendar, which involves lengthening the school year, shortening the summer break and adding longer breaks between sessions.

Several schools in B.C.—including Richmond’s Spul’u’kwuks elementary, Maple Ridge’s Kanaka Creek elementary, Langley’s Douglas Park community school, and Glendale elementary in Williams Lake—offer year-round schools.

“We have not worked out what schools [would be involved] at this point, but we’ve been talking about the balanced school calendar—year-round schools—for a year or so now and believe that the old agricultural, industrial-based calendar that currently exists with long summers may not necessarily be the right thing for everyone,” Cardwell told the Courier. “We want to give another choice to parents and students. We are aware Maple Ridge and Richmond have schools with a balanced-year calendar and they have long lineups or waiting lists to get in and we think we should be looking at the same concept.”

Cardwell promised extensive consultation with parents and staff at schools that are considered for the pilot, including surveys and discussions about the structure of the calendar. “We have about 16,000 students taking summer school every year and it’s not just remedial anymore,” he said. “Students are actually going to school during summer, so there’s obviously a very strong interest among parents and students.” Cardwell expects at least three schools, located across the district, will be involved. They’ll likely be evaluated over three years to determine advantages and disadvantages and whether such a calendar should be adopted district-wide.

Click here to read the entire Vancouver Sun article.

Summer updates. 2011 Summer Update

You are invited to join us at noon on Monday, October 3 for a special lecture on a a cultural and spiritual landmark.

“An Eighty-Year journey: The Making of the King James Bible” will be presented by Professor R. Gerald Hobbs, Emeritus Professor of Church History & Music, Vancouver School of Theology.

This event is held in conjunction with an exhibition – entitled The 400th Anniversary of the King James Bible 1611-2011 – that is on display at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections division.

For more about the event and to register, please visit here.

 

The Vancouver School Board could launch a year-round school pilot project at several city schools as early as 2012/13, according to superintendent Steve Cardwell.

Last year, trustees asked the district’s calendar committee to examine if educational advantages exist in having what’s known as a balanced calendar, which involves lengthening the school year, shortening the summer break and adding longer breaks between sessions.

Several schools in B.C.—including Richmond’s Spul’u’kwuks elementary, Maple Ridge’s Kanaka Creek elementary, Langley’s Douglas Park community school, and Glendale elementary in Williams Lake—offer year-round schools.

“We have not worked out what schools [would be involved] at this point, but we’ve been talking about the balanced school calendar—year-round schools—for a year or so now and believe that the old agricultural, industrial-based calendar that currently exists with long summers may not necessarily be the right thing for everyone,” Cardwell told the Courier. “We want to give another choice to parents and students. We are aware Maple Ridge and Richmond have schools with a balanced-year calendar and they have long lineups or waiting lists to get in and we think we should be looking at the same concept.”

These two databases are available on trial until the end of September. Please have a look and tell us what you think.  There’s a link to a feedback form on each database’s information page, linked below.

Ethnic NewsWatch
Full-text titles directly from the presses of ethnic, minority, and cultural groups, mostly in North America, from 1970 to current. View a list of titles in Ethnic NewsWatch here.

ProQuest Public Health
“Core public health literature with centralized access to over 690 publications with over 495 in full-text in a wide variety of disciplines ranging from social sciences and biological sciences to business.”  View a list of titles in ProQuest Public Health here.

An update on UBC and copyright appears in the Ubyssey, UBC’s student newspaper. You can read the article here.

Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel give an enlightening and entertaining TEDx talk about Google’s NGram Viewer tool and the emerging field of culturomics, which involves tracking historical trends through shifts in language.

Celebrate Science is a festival of B.C science writers for children and teens. This is a reminder that the event will be taking place on Saturday, 24 September 2011, from 8:30 am – 12:30 pm at the University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum.

This science extravaganza will appeal to teachers, teacher-librarians, student teachers, public librarians, child care workers and parents.  The half-day program will feature talented Canadian writers and illustrators whose books and passion for science spans all ages. They’ll explore scientific topics with the audience and highlight a wide range of books available for youth. The keynote speaker is Dr. Jeanette Whitton, Environmental biologist and Co-Director, Beaty Biodiversity Museum. Featured scientists include Dr. Wayne Maddison, the spider guy;  Dr. Amanda Vincent, Project Seahorse researcher and Dr. Eric Taylor, UBC Fish Collection.

Science writers from the Children’s Writers and Illustrators of BC (CWILL BC) will be presenting their books:

Fiona Bayrock,  author of Bubble Homes and Fish Farts

Tanya Kyi, 50 Questions series

Shar Levine & Leslie Johnstone, authors of over 70 hands-on science books such as Kitchen Science and their latest Snowy Science.

Cynthia Nicolson, Totally Human: Why We Look and Act the Way We Do;

Barry Shell, author of Sensational Scientists

Jim Wiese, Surrey High school teacher and author of over 40 books including Spy Science, Rocket Science and Cosmic Science.

There will be a science book fair and sales with a 10% discount for attendees.

To register online go to http://www.bookcentre.ca/store/products/celebrate_science_a_festival_bc_science_writers_kids_teens.

We hope to see you there!

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