Sketches of the Canadian west by H. Bullock Webster (1855-1942).  As a young man he came to Canada from England and began working as an apprentice clerk for the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1874. While in the service of the company Webster travelled extensively to HBC posts throughout northern Alberta and British Columbia.  Although never formally trained in art, Webster sketched throughout his life and while in the service of the Hudson’s Bay Company he compiled an album of some ninety three colour sketches depicting social life, activities, customs and dress in and around Hudson’s Bay Company posts, mainly around Stuart Lake and Fort McLeod during the period 1874 to 1880. Many of the sketches included First Nations and Metis people whose participation was critical to the Canadian fur trade. Several of Webster’s sketches were published in The Graphic magazine in England and provided British readers with images of frontier life in British Columbia and Alberta.

These and many others can be browsed in the Bullock Webster Sketches digital collection.

Woodcuts by unknown authors from ”Disaster Prints,” a part of the Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Period digital collection. 

UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections holds one of the world’s largest collections of maps and guidebooks of the Japanese Tokugawa period, ca. 1600-1867. Most of this collection was acquired from George H. Beans, the original collector, and is accompanied by his inventory A List of Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Era. To that has been added a small collection from George Bonn, as well as a number of maps acquired from various other sources.  Much of this collection has been digitized and is available for online browsing and is in the process of being updated with higher-resolution images.

“Thanks so much for all these links. I have been circulating them with the team!

Really appreciate your help and insights.”

BComm student

May, 2012

Heather Wolpert-Gawron, an award-winning middle school teacher recently polled 220 of her grade 8 students, asking them “What engages students?”

The Top 10 responses were:

1. Working with their peers

2. Working with technology

3. Connecting the real world to the work we do/Project-Based Learning

4. Love what you do

5. Get me out of my seat

6. Bring in visuals

7. Student choice

8. Understand the kids

9. Mix it up

10. Be human

Please click here to read the original (edutopia) blog post. 

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