This report brings together population-level data, where it exists, about the health indicators for boys (12 to 18 years) and young men (19 to 25 years) in British Columbia. Some of the data offers comparisons to girls and young women, while other data examines trends in health issues over time, or highlights different groups of young men who experience unequal risks and opportunities for health. Some of these are specific health conditions or illnesses, while others are environmental or risk behaviours that are strongly linked to illness, disability, or even death for boys and young men. They may affect boys’ and young men’s health while they are young, or set patterns that can lead to poor health or early mortality among older men. Together these data provide a picture of the key factors that contribute to the health status of boys and young men in Western Canada, and can serve as a source of information to help guide priority setting for health promotion and policy. Key issues include: Violence victimization, whether in the form of physical and sexual abuse, or bullying, or physical assaults and fighting, is an important contributor to a variety of the health issues identified in this report.  

Note: Funding for the XY factor report was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Vancouver Coastal Health. For more information, visit the UBC School of Nursing website at: http://www.nursing.ubc.ca/. Click on ‘View/Open’ to read the rest of the report in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/43707.

Did you know?

Two of the 76 students who received honorary degrees at a special ceremony held during UBC’s 2012 spring congregation in recognition of the Japanese Canadian students whose university experience was disrupted in 1942 were from the UBC School of Nursing. (see Nursing alumni news at: http://www.nursing.ubc.ca/Alumni/AlumniNews.aspx?id=28). View and/or download “A degree of justice” video about the 76 students in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/43625.

Closed for ChristmasEResources & Access, including “ej-help” and the License folks, will be closed after Friday, December 21st and re-opening Wednesday, January 2nd. Any questions and emails that arrive after this Friday will be reviewed when we re-open.

Thanks for sending us your problems in 2012. Seriously, helping you is why we are here!

Have a great Christmas. See you in the New Year.

…and remember to check UBC IT Bulletins for general, campus-wide problems.

In the UBC Fisheries Centre annual report for 2010-2011, Dr. Rashid Sumaila, Director and Professor of the UBC Fisheries Centre states:

The years 2010 and 2011 have been very exciting for those of us here at the Fisheries Centre. We welcomed two new faculty members, increasing the number of faculty at our Centre to twelve. First, we hired Dr Sang-Seon Yun, who comes to us from Kunsan National University in Korea, and is working with the Aboriginal Fisheries Research Unit in examining chemical communication systems of fishes. We also welcomed National Geographic Fellow Dr William W.L. Cheung, who obtained his PhD at UBC in 2007 and has returned to work on global change biology and fisheries.

The year 2011 also included the launch of a new website and visits from very distinguished guests thus helping the Fisheries Centre to ‘persevere in [its’] scholarly productivity and outreach efforts, with the goal of cultivating local and international fisheries awareness’.  Click on ‘View/Open’ to read the rest of the report in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/43679.

Did you know?

There are 190+ items in the Fisheries Centre collections in cIRcle. Explore these titles – Modelling the trophic role of marine mammals in tropical areas (2009); Total marine fisheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present (2010); Trade in seahorses and other syngnathids in countries outside Asia (1998-2001) (2011) and more. Or, browse the Fisheries Centre collections by Author, Title, Subjects and By Dept. Affiliation.

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