ab1 The Display for National Aboriginal History Month is up and ready for June.  Come by and have a look at the various books and DVDs related to the history and culture of Canada’s First Nations communities. 

“June was declared National Aboriginal History month in 2010, after Nanaimo-Cowichan Member of Parliament, Jean Crowder, introduced a motion to make June a month of recognition for First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The motion received unanimous consent in the House of Commons.

Aboriginal History Month provides an opportunity to recognize not only the historic contributions of Aboriginal peoples to the development of Canada, but also the strength of present-day Aboriginal communities and their promise for the future.ab2

Celebrating National Aboriginal History Month in June is a fitting tribute to the heritage and diversity of First Nation, Inuit and Métis communities across Canada.” (http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013778/1100100013779)

 

UBC Education Library has selected a wide array of our collection, mostly geared toward the instruction of Aboriginal History to children, for the display.

 

For Aboriginal (Un)History Month, we are featuring our digital collection of the Delgamuukw trial transcripts, which document a landmark case in British Columbian and Canadian history. Click the link above to learn more.

ab-month_button_150x150Throughout the month of June, the Library will be celebrating Aboriginal scholarship, creativity, and intellectual traditions with its second annual Aboriginal (Un)History Month. 

Featuring exhibits at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (IKBLC), Asian Library, and book displays at several library branches, the (Un)History month activities introduce ways UBC Indigenous scholars are bridging communities and transforming academic spaces through Indigenous approaches to research, pedagogy, and governance. It aims to educate and invite dialogue about (inter)relationships between place, recognition, and memory.

The UBC Education Library will also have book displays on the main level. One on the table near the circulation desk and another in the glass display case near the Reference area.  Photos of the displays will be posted shortly in an upcoming blog post.

The month includes:

Engaging Indigenous Knowledge(s) installation – features six cases at the IKBLC level 2 foyer.

  • Place, Belonging and Promise: Indigenizing the International Academy
  • Being Well Being: The Institute for Aboriginal Health’s Teaching and Learning Garden
  • Year of Indigenous Education
  • Living Our Indigenous Languages
  • Truth and Reconciliation in Canada
  • Raven in the Library at X̱wi7x̱wa

 Indigenous cultures in Asia exhibit (Asian Library)

Iron Pulpit: Missionary Printing Presses in British Columbia exhibit (Rare Books and Special Collections, IKBLC Level 1)

  • Featuring materials produced on missionary printing presses in British Columbia between the 1850s and 1910s, this exhibition looks at printed materials in context of Indigenous-Christian encounters, colonialism, and print culture in the province.

and Aboriginal literature displays in EducationKoernerIrving K. Barber Learning CentreX̱wi7x̱wa and Woodward libraries.

Cover of printed newspaperHonouring Traditions book coverIdle_nomore_Case-crop

For those interested in online resources, 

Posters are available as well (11×17) PDF.

For more information about Aboriginal (Un)History month activities, please contact Ann Doyle, Head, X̱wi7x̱wa Library at ann.doyle@ubc.ca.

The University of British Columbia Point Grey campus is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people. We thank Musqueam for its hospitality and support. 

As part of UBC Library’s commemoration of Canada’s National Aboriginal History Month, Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC) is pleased to present the return of last fall’s popular exhibition “The Iron Pulpit”: Missionary Printing Presses in British Columbia. The exhibition features materials produced on missionary printing presses in British Columbia between the 1850s and 1910s, and situates its subject in contexts of Indigenous-Christian encounter, colonialism, and print culture in the province.

Christian missionaries were deeply implicated in processes of Indigenous land dispossession and colonial assimilation in British Columbia, and printing presses supported this effort. The exhibition’s curators acknowledge that this is a sensitive topic in our contemporary climate. Current public discussions concerning residential schools are a stark reminder of Christianity’s central role in Canadian colonialism, and this project situates missionary printing presses and their imprints directly in this context. At the same time, the exhibition joins recent scholarship in advocating and advancing more nuanced interpretations of religious encounter.

Highlights from the exhibition include:

The Thompson Liturgy, printed on the St. Paul’s Mission Press, which contains surveys and inventories of the mission at Lytton, BC, including a list of villages, chiefs, and watchmen belonging to St. Paul’s as of January 1, 1873.

Jean-Marie Le Jeune’s 1897 Polyglott Manual, which translated Latin Prayers for the mass into eight different languages and dialects, including Shushwap, and was printed on the Kamloops Mission Press.

Ignis, the Nisga’a story of the formation of a large lava plain in the Naas Valley, written in both English and Nisga’a and printed by missionary James Benjamin McCullagh on the Aiyansh Mission Press in the early 20th century.

The exhibition was originally curated by the Alicia Fahey (PhD Student, Department of English) and Chelsea Horton (PhD Candidate, Department of History). Their impressive research resulted in a fascinating, scholarly, and detailed exhibition catalogue, which includes an introductory essay, item descriptions, and a checklist of extant missionary printing press imprints. Many thanks to Alicia and Chelsea for their incredible work!

The exhibition will run from June 3 until June 28, 2013, in RBSC, on level one of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, and is open to the public Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The theme for UBC Library’s Aboriginal (Un)History Month this year is “Engaging Indigenous Knowledge(s).” The month-long series of events, exhibitions, and displays will introduce ways UBC Indigenous scholars are bridging communities and transforming academic spaces through Indigenous approaches to research, pedagogy, and governance. Aboriginal (Un)History Month also aims to educate and invite dialogue about (inter)relationships between place, recognition, and memory.

Koerner Library, Education Library and David Lam Library will be closed on Saturday, June 8, with normal hours resuming on June 9.

The closure is due to maintenance work from UBC Building Operations which includes a series of buildings on campus. Koerner Library, the Neville Scarfe Building and the Henry Angus Building will be affected by the electrical maintenance. The work will be done on a primary power switch gear, requiring a full electrical shutdown for the group of buildings.

For information on the maintenance, affected departments and times, please visit the UBC Building Operations website.

Throughout the month of June, the Library will be celebrating Aboriginal scholarship, creativity, and intellectual traditions with its second annual Aboriginal (Un)History Month. Featuring exhibits at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (IKBLC), Asian Library, and book displays at several library branches, the (Un)History month activities introduce ways UBC Indigenous scholars are bridging communities and transforming academic spaces through Indigenous approaches to research, pedagogy, and governance. It aims to educate and invite dialogue about (inter)relationships between place, recognition, and memory. The month includes: Engaging Indigenous Knowledge(s) installation – features six cases at the IKBLC level 2 foyer.

  • Place, Belonging and Promise: Indigenizing the International Academy
  • Being Well Being: The Institute for Aboriginal Health’s Teaching and Learning Garden
  • Year of Indigenous Education
  • Living Our Indigenous Languages
  • Truth and Reconciliation in Canada
  • Raven in the Library at Xwi7xwa

Indigenous cultures in Asia exhibit (Asian Library)

Iron Pulpit: Missionary Printing Presses in British Columbia exhibit (Rare Books and Special Collections, IKBLC Level 1)

and Aboriginal literature displays in EducationKoernerIrving K. Barber Learning CentreXwi7xwa and Woodward libraries.

Cover of printed newspaperHonouring Traditions book coverIdle_nomore_Case-crop

 

 

 

 

 

For those interested in online resources,

For more information about Aboriginal (Un)History month activities, please contact Ann Doyle, Head, Xwi7xwa Library at ann.doyle@ubc.ca The University of British Columbia Point Grey campus is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people. We thank Musqueam for its hospitality and support.

Throughout the month of June, the Library will be celebrating Aboriginal scholarship, creativity, and intellectual traditions with its second annual Aboriginal (Un)History Month. 

Featuring an exhibit at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (IKBLC), Aboriginal (Un)History Month introduces ways UBC Indigenous scholars are bridging communities and transforming academic spaces through Indigenous approaches to research. It aims to educate and invite dialogue about (inter)relationships between place, recognition and memory. There is also an exhibit at the Asian Library, and book displays at several Library branches.

The month includes:

Engaging Indigenous Knowledge(s) installation – features six cases at the IKBLC level 2 foyer.

Place, Belonging and Promise: Indigenizing the International Academy
Curated by Dr. Shelly Johnson (Mukwa Musayett), UBC School of Social Work – Vancouver Campus 
(Case Label | Poster)

Being Well Being: The Institute for Aboriginal Health’s Teaching and Learning Garden
Curated by Dr. Teresa Howell, Research Manager at the Institute for Aboriginal Health (IAH) 
(Poster)

Year of Indigenous Education
Curated by Aurelia A.K. Kinslow and Dr. Jo-Ann Archibald, The Year of Indigenous Education

Living Our Indigenous Languages 
Curated by Dr. Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla, UBC Department of Language & Literacy Education
(Case Label | Poster)

Truth and Reconciliation in Canada 
Curated by Amy Perreault, Strategist of Aboriginal Initiatives at the Centre for Teaching and Learning Technology
(Case Label | Poster)

Raven in the Library at Xwi7xwa
Curated by Xwi7xwa Library
(Poster)

 

Indigenous cultures in Asia exhibit (Asian Library)

Iron Pulpit: Missionary Printing Presses in British Columbia exhibit (Rare Books and Special Collections, IKBLC Level 1)

  • Featuring materials produced on missionary printing presses in British Columbia between the 1850s and 1910s, this exhibition looks at printed materials in context of Indigenous-Christian encounters, colonialism, and print culture in the province.

and Aboriginal literature displays in AsianEducationKoernerIrving K. Barber Learning CentreXwi7xwa and Woodward libraries.

Cover of printed newspaperIdle_nomore_Case-crop quote

For those interested in online resources, 

Posters are available as well (11×17) PDF.

For more information about Aboriginal (Un)History month activities, please contact Ann Doyle, Head, Xwi7xwa Library at ann.doyle@ubc.ca.

The University of British Columbia Point Grey campus is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people. We thank Musqueam for its hospitality and support. 

The Vancouver School Board is thinking of implementing a social media policy that would prohibit teachers from being friends with their students on social media sites. Teachers and students would only be permitted to communicate on these sites for educational purposes (ex: asking/answering questions about a classroom assignment, contributing to a class blog, etc). 

Click here to read the article by CBC news

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