Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and in partnership with the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, with support from the UBC First Nations House of Learning, the UBC Department of History and Kloshe Tillicum (Network Environments for Aboriginal Health Research). Shortly after WWII, when knowledge about nutrition was still sparse, scientists in Canada took advantage of already malnourished aboriginal communities by using them as research subjects to investigate the effects of different diets and dietary supplements. Evidence of these government-run experiments was brought to the forefront by food historian and UBC History alumnus Ian Mosby, and the research has gained widespread recognition. Sometimes the experiments involved decreasing food intake or withholding supplements. Hundreds of indigenous people across Canada were included in the experiments, of which they had no knowledge, and many of them were children in the Indian Residential School system.

The fallout from this unethical treatment is still having an effect today. Join us for a panel discussion about this distressing era in Canadian history and find out how UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems is working to address issues such as access to healthy, traditional food; food security for all; and land stewardship.

Shortly after WWII, when knowledge about nutrition was still sparse, scientists in Canada took advantage of already malnourished aboriginal communities by using them as research subjects to investigate the effects of different diets and dietary supplements. Evidence of these government-run experiments was brought to the forefront by food historian and UBC History alumnus Ian Mosby, and the research has gained widespread recognition. Sometimes the experiments involved decreasing food intake or withholding supplements. Hundreds of indigenous people across Canada were included in the experiments, of which they had no knowledge, and many of them were children in the Indian Residential School system. The fallout from this unethical treatment is still having an effect today.

Moderator
Jo-Ann Archibald, BEd (Elem)’72 – Associate Dean for Indigenous Education, UBC’s Faculty of Education

Presenter
Ian Mosby, BA’03 – Postdoctoral Fellow, L.R. Wilson Institute for Canadian History, McMaster University

Panelists
Chief Robert Joseph, LLD’03 – Hereditary Chief, Gwawaenuk First Nation; Ambassador for Reconciliation Canada and the Indian Residential School Survivors Society

Eduardo Jovel, MSc’96, PhD’02 – Director, Indigenous Research Partnerships; Associate Professor, Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Jessie Newman – UBC Dietetics student

Gerry Oleman – Member, St’at’imc Nation

Literature Reviews – Great Research Starts Here 

This session is appropriate for students conducting literature reviews in any discipline.
Topics include
… what is a literature review?
… finding the right databases
… search strategies for databases
… finding scholarly articles, theses and dissertations, books, and more
… resources to help you keep track of your research.
There will be plenty of hands-on time for searching, and assistance from the two presenting librarians.

Register here: http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/5343

 

Woodward Library 50th Anniversary Event

1Learn about the link between obesity and diabetes, current treatment options for type 2 diabetes and how genetics and personalized medicine will inform better treatments in the near future.

This talk is an informal and open forum that aims to bring the latest and greatest ideas in the area of the Life Sciences to the public. Each event is free to attend and will include a talk, networking opportunities and reception. This series focuses on Personalized Medicine and how the Life Sciences Institute faculty, staff and students are working to change clinical practice, improve health outcomes, and reduce health costs.  In partnership with the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Health Information Series, an ongoing public lecture series that take place in the Lower Mainland community, this talk will also be recorded for webcast viewing at a later date. 

Insulin – The good, the bad and the complicated

Jim Johnson, PhD
Associate Professor, UBC Life Sciences Institute, Diabetes Research Group

Do these genes make me fat?

Susanne Clee, PhD
Assistant Professor, UBC Life Sciences Institute, Diabetes Research Group

New drugs in diabetes

Tom Elliott, MD
Medical Director, BC Diabetes and Associate Professor of Medicine, UBC

Diabetes management: How do I do what my doctor asked me to do?

Gerri Klein, RN, MSN
Certified Diabetes Educator, BC Diabetes

Moderator

Timothy Kieffer, PhD
Group Leader and Professor, UBC Life Sciences Institute, Diabetes Research Group


Wednesday, November 26, 2014, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Alice MacKay Room, Lower Level
Central Library
350 West Georgia Street


To attend this talk, please RSVP online.


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For more information about this series, please contact Lee Ann Bryant, Reference Librarian or Allan Cho, Community Engagement Librarian

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