UBC graduate students can now learn to use NVivo, a qualitative data analysis software. UBC Library is offering training sessions and one-on-one support for researchers hoping to use the tool.

NVivo is a powerful data analysis software for researchers analyzing large quantities of data. It can be used to search, analyze and map new relationships in the data. Commonly used for data from interviews, content analysis and ethnography, the software is also capable of analyzing data from social media, audio recordings, web pages and literature reviews.

UBC Library’s Research Commons at Koerner Library will be offering support for NVivo beginning in late January. Workshops will be offered weekly, and one-on-one support will also be available to help students with:

  • Installing the software
  • Creating new projects
  • Importing a variety of sources, including documents, PDFs, spreadsheets, audio and video files, and data from online sources
  • Becoming familiar with the technical aspects of coding in NVivo
  • Using NVivo’s tools to explore and present relationships and trends in qualitative data

For more information or to book a one-on-one consultation, contact the Research Commons NVivo team or check the Library’s event calendar for upcoming sessions.

 

Cover image: Marc Smith, Twitter search dataset, data visualization.

At the core of the study of history are questions about what events and people from the past are important and why they are important.
The Historical significance video and accompanying written materials offer an engaging way to introduce the concept of historical significance by comparing internment events during the First and Second World Wars.

Watch the video
Download the lesson plan (grades 6-8)
Download the lesson plan (grades 9-12)

Find out more about the Historical Thinking video series. See more resources in The Thinking Teacher archives.

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