Vancouver is establishing itself as a prime location for technology start-ups in Canada; this emergence will provide benefits to the technology sector. Tech businesses need to get these five things right to establish themselves and grow. The five key components to successfully starting a high-tech small business are listed below, along with additional resources for further reading.

1. Reach out to a mentor 

Mentors will play a crucial role in shaping the people and the product or a service behind any small business. They will also be able to provide guidance on the other four components discussed here. This is the most important piece that a small business needs to get it right. At the University of British Columbia, our partners in the e@UBC program helps small businesses with unprecedented mentorship opportunities. If you are exploring the idea of working with an incubator or accelerator in Canada or elsewhere, start with the fantastic resource by MaRS Library “Accelerators and incubators.”

2. Know your funding options

There are a vast set of funding options available to raise money for businesses. It is important to find the least risky option and still secure the finances required. The federal and provincial government provide grants and tax cuts to small businesses based on eligibility. To learn more about the funding options available, visit the Funding & Financing page on our site.

3. Protect your intellectual property

Businesses in the technology field lose their competitive advantage once their product or service is open for imitation. For this reason, any developed technology and other intellectual property of the small business needs to be protected through patents. The Canadian Intellectual Property Office provides steps on how to apply for a Canadian patent.

4. Find the right marketing medium

Marketing plays a key role in attracting customers to your business in its initial phase. To find out more about the key resources in marketing and how to develop a marketing plan, check out our marketing resources.

5. Use the right set of tools

It is essential to be aware of all of the digital tools that are available to enhance your business’ offerings. The e-tools page provides a comprehensive list of all the tools that can help your business in tasks such as designing, branding, and much more.

If you would like to access more resources, the High Technology Sector Accelerator Guide is designed to help prospective and existing business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that covers how to start your research, industry information, competitive information, and customer information. Depending on your needs, you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics Guide, it will help you focus on the information you will need to gather and why it is important. If you just want a quick read, check out PWC’s “2016 Technology Industry Trends.”

Related Accelerator guides

Web Design - Web Development Business Accelerator Guide
Mobile App Development Business Accelerator Guide

 

Business Planning

Vancouver is establishing itself as a prime location for technology start-ups in Canada; this emergence will provide benefits to the technology sector. Tech businesses need to get these five things right to establish themselves and grow. The five key components to successfully starting a high-tech small business are listed below, along with additional resources for further reading.

1. Reach out to a mentor 

Mentors will play a crucial role in shaping the people and the product or a service behind any small business. They will also be able to provide guidance on the other four components discussed here. This is the most important piece that a small business needs to get it right. At the University of British Columbia, our partners in the e@UBC program helps small businesses with unprecedented mentorship opportunities. If you are exploring the idea of working with an incubator or accelerator in Canada or elsewhere, start with the fantastic resource by MaRS Library “Accelerators and incubators.”

2. Know your funding options

There are a vast set of funding options available to raise money for businesses. It is important to find the least risky option and still secure the finances required. The federal and provincial government provide grants and tax cuts to small businesses based on eligibility. To learn more about the funding options available, visit the Funding & Financing page on our site.

3. Protect your intellectual property

Businesses in the technology field lose their competitive advantage once their product or service is open for imitation. For this reason, any developed technology and other intellectual property of the small business needs to be protected through patents. The Canadian Intellectual Property Office provides steps on how to apply for a Canadian patent.

4. Find the right marketing medium

Marketing plays a key role in attracting customers to your business in its initial phase. To find out more about the key resources in marketing and how to develop a marketing plan, check out our marketing resources.

5. Use the right set of tools

It is essential to be aware of all of the digital tools that are available to enhance your business’ offerings. The e-tools page provides a comprehensive list of all the tools that can help your business in tasks such as designing, branding, and much more.

If you would like to access more resources, the High Technology Sector Accelerator Guide is designed to help prospective and existing business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that covers how to start your research, industry information, competitive information, and customer information. Depending on your needs, you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics Guide, it will help you focus on the information you will need to gather and why it is important. If you just want a quick read, check out PWC’s “2016 Technology Industry Trends.”

Related Accelerator guides

Web Design - Web Development Business Accelerator Guide
Mobile App Development Business Accelerator Guide

 

Business Planning
The return of the mandatory Census questionnaire has generated excitement among Canadians. Although May 10, 2016 is the official  census day, it is not a strict deadline, according to Statistics Canada. Canadians are being asked to complete it as soon as they can in the following days. Many have yet to fill out their questionnaire. So what exactly is the […]
“Thank you for looking into that for me, I really appreciate all your help and support.” – MBA student, May 2016

Great things happen when our brightest minds have the freedom to explore. When we pursue our unique interests, the resulting collective capacity for innovation is limitless. The issues of the future will require these creative solutions as the need to build connections between people, nations and disciplines has never been greater.

On May 28th, UBC closed out the Centennial year with some great minds providing perspectives on topics of the future.


The topic of ‘human-robot interaction’ will still be a hot one in 100 years. The tools may change but the problems, such as “How do people and robots get along?” will remain the same. Questions surrounding what robots should do; and how we can share, operate safely, communicate, take turns, teach robots, and generally get along together will continue to be problems requiring solutions. The efforts we make to establish the ‘rules of engagement’ now will certainly be foundational to our future relationships.

Elizabeth Croft was featured in the video “A Robot in Every Home” in the February 2015 online issue of Trek Magazine.

@ecroft

Moderated by Marc Parlange – Dean and Professor, UBC’s Faculty of Applied Science


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Bartneck, C., Kulić, D., Croft, E., & Zoghbi, S. (2009). Measurement instruments for the anthropomorphism, animacy, likeability, perceived intelligence, and perceived safety of robots. International Journal of Social Robotics, 1(1), 71-81. doi:10.1007/s12369-008-0001-3 [Link]

Kulić, D., & Croft, E. (2007). Pre-collision safety strategies for human-robot interaction. Autonomous Robots, 22(2), 149-164. doi:10.1007/s10514-006-9009-4 [Link]

Luu, B. L., Inglis, J. T., Huryn, T. P., Van der Loos, H. F. Machiel, Croft, E. A., & Blouin, J. (2012). Human Standing is Modified by an Unconscious Integration of Congruent Sensory and Motor Signals: Vestibular-Motor Pathways in Standing. The Journal of Physiology, 590(22), 5783-5794. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2012.230334 [Link]

Sheikholeslami, S., Moon, A., & Croft, E. A. (2015). Exploring the Effect of Robot Hand Configurations in Directional Gestures for Human-Robot Interaction. Paper presented at the 3594-3599. doi:10.1109/IROS.2015.7353879 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Mechanical Engineering


Great things happen when our brightest minds have the freedom to explore. When we pursue our unique interests, the resulting collective capacity for innovation is limitless. The issues of the future will require these creative solutions as the need to build connections between people, nations and disciplines has never been greater.

On May 28th, UBC closed out the Centennial year with some great minds providing perspectives on topics of the future.


What will we eat when we need to feed 11 billion people globally by 2100?* With rapid population increase and climate change coupled with the focus on cash crops and loss of food diversity, is a fundamental shift in our diets and the way our food is supplied essential for us to be able to feed ourselves equitably worldwide? Hear from chef, restauranteur and climate change activist, Meeru Dhalwala, on her insights on these and other aspects of our future food sources.

*Sources: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/18/world-population-new-study-11bn-2100

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/346/6206/234

@MeeruDhalwala

Moderated by Rickey Yada, BSc’77, MSc’80, PhD’84 – Dean and Professor, UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Dyson, Tim. Population and Food: Global Trends and Future Prospects. London: Routledge, 1996. Print. [Available at Koerner Library – HD9000.5 .D97 1996]

Murphy, Elaine M. Food and Population: A Global Concern. Washington, D.C. : Population Reference Bureau, Inc., 1984. Print. [Available at Koerner Library – HD9000.5 .M87 1984]

on Agriculture, S., & Forestry. (2014). Innovation in agriculture: The key to feeding a growing population Canada. Senate Committee Reports. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Dietetics and Nutrition

Food Science

Health Statistics & Data

Population and Public Health

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