Great things happen when our brightest minds have the freedom to explore. When we pursue our unique interests, the resulting collective capacity for innovation is limitless. The issues of the future will require these creative solutions as the need to build connections between people, nations and disciplines has never been greater.

On May 28th, UBC wclosed out the Centennial year with some great minds providing perspectives on topics of the future.


We are living a turning point in history, the moment when we are re-envisioning industrial society. We now know that the cumulative impacts of our fossil fuel economy threaten the air we breathe, the water we drink and even a stable economy and climate. The good news is that major advances in technology and the dramatic drop in the price of renewable energy make the scale of change necessary within our grasp.

@Tzeporah

Moderated by Kathryn Harrison, PhD’93 – Senior Associate Dean, UBC’s Faculty of Arts; Professor of Political Science


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Berman Tzeporah, Christopher Hatch; Maurice Gibbons; Ronald B. Hatch; Gordon Brent Ingram; Loys Maingon (1994). Clayoquot & Dissent. Ronsdale Press. [Link]

Berman, T., & Leiren-Young, M. (2011). This crazy time: Living our environmental challenge. Toronto: Knopf Canada. [Available at Okanagan Library – GE195.9 .B47 2011]


UBC Library Research Guides

Natural Resources Conservation

Sustainability

copyright-389901_640

 

“The University of British Columbia and its faculty, staff and students are creators of various forms of intellectual property, as well as consumers of intellectual property. As creators, we rely on the protections offered by intellectual property laws to ensure that our work product is protected from improper use. As consumers of intellectual property, we are legally (and morally) obligated to respect the intellectual property rights of others, just as we expect others to respect our intellectual property rights…One intellectual property right that is very important to UBC faculty, staff and students is copyright.”

 

Coming soon! The blockbuster summer of Copyright Education Series’ Workshops you were waiting for starts next week.

Six free Library workshops will be presented by the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office and will focus on several key themes to help the UBC community find answers to their copyright questions and more!

Reserve your spot today!

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Copyright for Authors and Creators workshop

Just finished your research project/report and looking to publish it?

Want to make sure your work has the copyright protection you need?

Register here

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Copyright for the Classroom workshop

Have questions about screening films in class? Want to distribute readings

to your students? Want to use someone else’s images in your online course?

pages?

Register here

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Copyright and Conference Presentations

Curious about using other people’s figures in your conference presentations?

Wondering if presenting a paper at a conference counts as prior publication?

A conference organizer looking for an overview of copyright considerations?

Register here

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Navigating Copyright in the Digital Environment workshop

Unsure about what you can post on a UBC departmental website, personal blog,

shared wiki space, or social media platform? Learn what to keep in mind when

using other people’s copyrighted work on publicly available websites.

Register here

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Copyright and Ethics in Scholarly Publishing

Have questions about plagiarism and academic integrity? What about “self-plagiarism”

and “gift authorship”? Find out what you need to know to get your work out there

ethically while preserving your own rights to it.

Register here

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Author Rights, Funding Mandates, and Open Access Publishing

Curious about managing copyright in academic publishing? Explore funder open access

policies and the different options available for open access publishing.

Register here

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay and partial excerpt in italics is courtesy of UBC’s Copyright at UBC website

The ICPSR Summer Program would like to announce the following workshop, sponsored by the National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program:

Secondary Analysis of Data from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study

Dates and Location: August 3-5, 2016 in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Instructor: Kristie Taylor, Westat

The Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study is a collaboration between the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The PATH Study is a household-based, nationally representative, longitudinal cohort study of approximately 46,000 U.S. adults and youth (12 years and older). The study was launched in 2011 to inform FDA’s regulatory activities under the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

Focusing on the first wave of data (collected from Sept. 2013-Dec. 2014), participants will be introduced to the PATH Study, including the design, sample, data collection procedures, instruments, and variables. Participants will gain a thorough understanding of how to use and link PATH Study data files. The course is a combination of lecture, discussion, and hands-on exercises. It is designed for faculty and research professionals as well as for advanced graduate students interested in tobacco regulatory science who are comfortable with data analysis software and quantitative research in the social sciences.

Prerequisites: Participants should have a basic understanding of secondary data organization and manipulation, fundamental data analysis skills, working knowledge of a statistical software package (e.g., SAS, Stata, R) and a substantive interest in tobacco regulatory research.

Application: Admission is competitive. Enrollment is limited to 25 participants. Sign up through the Summer Program’s registration portal. Then, upload the following documents via the portal:

Current curriculum vita
Cover letter summarizing research interests and experiences

Priority will be given to applicants with immediate interest in using the PATH Study data for tobacco regulatory research and who provide a research project description to do so, including references to theory or historical context, how the project extends what is presently known, and why the PATH Study data are needed for the project.

Application Deadline: May 23, 2016

QUESTIONS:

For issues related to registration, contact sumprog@icpsr.umich.edu

For questions related to the PATH Study data, contact nahdap@icpsr.umich.edu

The University Archives has launched a new on-line resource: an annotated list of First Nations-related historical resources held in the Archives.

This is an overview of resources maintained by the Archives which may be relevant to research on First Nations history and contemporary issues. It includes references to relevant materials in our various collections and links to information presented on our website. These are cited as documenting First Nations history and culture in general, and the evolution of UBC’s relationships with First Nations in particular. They include archival materials in all media (textual, photographic, audiovisual, and digital), websites, and Internet-based collections and related resources.

The focus of this compilation is on research materials held in the University Archives. Researchers are advised to consult with staff in other Library branches, such as Rare Books and Special Collections and Xwi7xwa Library, regarding materials in their collections.

This list is not intended to be fully comprehensive, but will serve as an introduction for researchers. Patrons researching specific individuals, groups, or events may find information in other collections and resources maintained by the Archives but not listed here. Archives staff are available to suggest other avenues of research and otherwise provide assistance.

Thanks to Ann Doyle and her colleagues at Xwi7xwa Library for their guidance in compiling this list.

The University Archives has launched a new on-line resource: an annotated list of First Nations-related historical resources held in the Archives.

This is an overview of resources maintained by the Archives which may be relevant to research on First Nations history and contemporary issues. It includes references to relevant materials in our various collections and links to information presented on our website. These are cited as documenting First Nations history and culture in general, and the evolution of UBC’s relationships with First Nations in particular. They include archival materials in all media (textual, photographic, audiovisual, and digital), websites, and Internet-based collections and related resources.

The focus of this compilation is on research materials held in the University Archives. Researchers are advised to consult with staff in other Library branches, such as Rare Books and Special Collections and Xwi7xwa Library, regarding materials in their collections.

This list is not intended to be fully comprehensive, but will serve as an introduction for researchers. Patrons researching specific individuals, groups, or events may find information in other collections and resources maintained by the Archives but not listed here. Archives staff are available to suggest other avenues of research and otherwise provide assistance.

Thanks to Ann Doyle and her colleagues at Xwi7xwa Library for their guidance in compiling this list.

“Thank you so much for all your support and hard work over the years! You have all provided a huge ‘value-add’ to my undergraduate degree and I thank you for your work.” – 2016 BCom Graduate, April 2016

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