Canada is celebrating it’s 149th birthday this week, so we’ve pulled together some fun Canadiana from Open Collections for you to enjoy!

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Few things are more Canadian than a moose! Sketch from H. Bullock-Webster collection, late 19th C.

The phenomenal Chung Collection features an incredible array of materials related to the early history of British Columbia, and the immigration and settlement that took place in the province from the mid-19th century. The collection also features a large array of documents and ephemera related to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company’s operations, including some colourful advertisements.

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Canadian Pacific Airlines poster, 1974

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Canadian Pacific Railway Company advertisement, 1926

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have thousands of maps here at Open Collections, a number of which highlight the evolution of knowledge about Canada and its geography over time. Take a look at the Andrew McCormick Maps and Prints collection if you want to explore more!

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Map of New France, Louisiana and Canada, dated 1712

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Dominion of Canada map, produced some time after 1873

It would be impossible to celebrate Canada Day without acknowledging the vital role that multiculturalism plays in Canadian society. The many, many contributions by those originating from other parts of the world, as well as the Aboriginal peoples who have always called this place home, is a large part of what makes Canada great!

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Using steam to shape a canoe, Museum of Anthropology, 1981

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Costumed girl at the Japanese bell, UBC Asian Centre, 1987

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a great Canada Day, and be sure to check out Open Collections for more Canadian content!

Portrait photography involves capturing the likeness of a person or persons using various photographic equipment- in either a studio or at a specific location. This type of photography is particularly popular for special occasions such as weddings, engagements, and births. In order to operate a successful portrait photography business, photographers need solid business management skills, along with experience behind the lens. This field has been greatly impacted by advents in technology; however the industry is expected to grow moderately in the coming years.

Industry Overview

BC

In British Columbia the photography industry includes everything from studio photographers, to photo journalists to technical photographers. According to WorkBC, the photography profession appeals more to younger workers with more than 50% of those employed in the industry being between the ages of 25 and 44. This is likely because of the need for photographers to be industrious and self-promoting in order to become successful. Statistics Canada states that BC has the third highest number of photgraphy businesses in the country after Ontario and Quebec. However, as most studios employ fewer than 4 people, the likelihood of being employed by an outside source is not high. As a result, many photographers are self-employed and only 32% of photographers are 

working full-time, meaning that many photographers have multiple jobs, or pursue various artistic projects to make ends meet (WorkBC). Like most markets, opportunities are more prevalent in concentrated urban centres but the competition is also higher in these locations.

Canada

According to the 2011 National Household Survey, 71,580 photographers are employed in Canada, with 75% of them working in portrait photography. In Canada school portrait photography makes up 15.3% of the market, personal and group photography is another 34.7% and weddings make up a mere 5.5% (IBIS World). As photography services are considered discretionary, the success of the industry is directly tied to the strength of the economy and those with disposable income are more likely to hire photographers for special occasions or events. As a result the number of photographers in Canada has decreased in the last few years  and job openings in already existent companies are likely only to be generated when people retire (Stats Canada). Overall, however, IBIS World’s Industry Outlook projects moderate growth in the Canadian photography industry over the next five years as the economy continues to improve. 

Financial Performance Benchmarks

Portrait Photographers fall under the Photography Services (NAICS 54192) category. The chart below pulls the latest financial data from the specific Industry Canada page and compares the cost structure of Photography Services as compared to the sector (Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (NAICS 54)). The main difference between the sector and industry is that the scope of the sector is larger (broader NAICS code) as compared to an industry, which is essentially a specific "group of companies or businesses"

Industry Trends and Challenges

With an increase in the affordability and availability of high quality cameras over the past few years, the photography industry all over the world has drastically shifted. Gone are the days of dominating heavy hitters in the field, such as the large portrait studios formerly found in every Sears department store. Currently the Canadian portrait photography market is filled with numerous small studios that usually operate within a limited geographic region.

According to the IBIS World Industry Report, this access to technology has also limited the need for professional training and has increased the number of self-taught photographers who are self-employed. Additionally, the affordability of editing software has also cut back on the operating costs of most photographers. However as the number of industry operators increases, photographers must think creatively to set themselves apart from their competition. Social media has become a great way for photographers to show off their skills and connect with both past and potential clients. This online presence has become integral to the success of photographers, especially those who are independently run, and operate without a fixed studio space.

Resources

Associations

Magazines & Trade Journals

Directories

Additional Resources

If you would like to access more resources, the Portrait Photography Accelerator Guide is designed to help prospective and existing business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics Guide, it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why it is important.

Related Guides

Portrait photography involves capturing the likeness of a person or persons using various photographic equipment- in either a studio or at a specific location. This type of photography is particularly popular for special occasions such as weddings, engagements, and births. In order to operate a successful portrait photography business, photographers need solid business management skills, along with experience behind the lens. This field has been greatly impacted by advents in technology; however the industry is expected to grow moderately in the coming years.

Industry Overview

BC

In British Columbia the photography industry includes everything from studio photographers, to photo journalists to technical photographers. According to WorkBC, the photography profession appeals more to younger workers with more than 50% of those employed in the industry being between the ages of 25 and 44. This is likely because of the need for photographers to be industrious and self-promoting in order to become successful. Statistics Canada states that BC has the third highest number of photgraphy businesses in the country after Ontario and Quebec. However, as most studios employ fewer than 4 people, the likelihood of being employed by an outside source is not high. As a result, many photographers are self-employed and only 32% of photographers are 

working full-time, meaning that many photographers have multiple jobs, or pursue various artistic projects to make ends meet (WorkBC). Like most markets, opportunities are more prevalent in concentrated urban centres but the competition is also higher in these locations.

Canada

According to the 2011 National Household Survey, 71,580 photographers are employed in Canada, with 75% of them working in portrait photography. In Canada school portrait photography makes up 15.3% of the market, personal and group photography is another 34.7% and weddings make up a mere 5.5% (IBIS World). As photography services are considered discretionary, the success of the industry is directly tied to the strength of the economy and those with disposable income are more likely to hire photographers for special occasions or events. As a result the number of photographers in Canada has decreased in the last few years  and job openings in already existent companies are likely only to be generated when people retire (Stats Canada). Overall, however, IBIS World’s Industry Outlook projects moderate growth in the Canadian photography industry over the next five years as the economy continues to improve. 

Financial Performance Benchmarks

Portrait Photographers fall under the Photography Services (NAICS 54192) category. The chart below pulls the latest financial data from the specific Industry Canada page and compares the cost structure of Photography Services as compared to the sector (Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (NAICS 54)). The main difference between the sector and industry is that the scope of the sector is larger (broader NAICS code) as compared to an industry, which is essentially a specific "group of companies or businesses"

Industry Trends and Challenges

With an increase in the affordability and availability of high quality cameras over the past few years, the photography industry all over the world has drastically shifted. Gone are the days of dominating heavy hitters in the field, such as the large portrait studios formerly found in every Sears department store. Currently the Canadian portrait photography market is filled with numerous small studios that usually operate within a limited geographic region.

According to the IBIS World Industry Report, this access to technology has also limited the need for professional training and has increased the number of self-taught photographers who are self-employed. Additionally, the affordability of editing software has also cut back on the operating costs of most photographers. However as the number of industry operators increases, photographers must think creatively to set themselves apart from their competition. Social media has become a great way for photographers to show off their skills and connect with both past and potential clients. This online presence has become integral to the success of photographers, especially those who are independently run, and operate without a fixed studio space.

Resources

Associations

Magazines & Trade Journals

Directories

Additional Resources

If you would like to access more resources, the Portrait Photography Accelerator Guide is designed to help prospective and existing business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics Guide, it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why it is important.

Related Guides

According to data released from LinkedIn in 2016, the platform has more than 433 million users in over 200 countries around the world. Based on a study of more than 5000 businesses, HubSpot reported that LinkedIn has the highest visitor-to-lead conversion rate at 2.74%. This number is much higher when compared to other platforms like Twitter (.69%) and Facebook (.77%).

What do numbers mean to an entrepreneur or a small business? LinkedIn is no longer an optional platform but an important channel to promote your profile and business. This post examines how LinkedIn can be utilized in a unique way when compared to other social media channels.       

1. Create a personal brand

At its core, LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking service. You can use it to create a personal brand and establish yourself as an expert in any field. A LinkedIn profile acts as a marketing presentation of your professional accomplishments and can help break down barriers and establish connections with others.     

2. Write engaging content

With LinkedIn publishing, the platform is now a leading channel where content resides. Many influencers and business owners publish content on LinkedIn to keep their network engaged. Writing original content also acts as a Search Engine Optimization (SEO) strategy, as articles that are published have a good chance of being picked up by Google indexing. Hence, being ranked higher in a Google Search provides more opportunity to engage with your network as well as potential customers.

3. Get insights on clients

With profile data such as a job title, years of experience, industry involved, etc. LinkedIn provides deep insight about potential customers. This is especially true if the small business is based on a Business to Business (B2B) model. According to an August 2014 study by Content Marketing Institute (CMI) and MarketingProfs, B2B marketers rated LinkedIn as the most effective (63%) platform for distributing content.     

4. Engage with customers presale and after sale

According to a study from Regalix, July 2015, LinkedIn is the most effective platform for customer engagement both during pre-sale (64%) and post-sale (51%). Be it publishing content, introducing a product or service offering, or writing how-to guides, LinkedIn can help to reach customer throughout the sales cycle. Moreover, a personal profile and company page will act as a repository for educating customers.   

5. Seek advice, hire talent

LinkedIn is not only a platform to sell but to seek expert opinions or to hire people who can contribute to the success of a business. LinkedIn experts in various disciplines such as entrepreneurship, start-up growth, and many more can be reached for advice if you are well connected. LinkedIn also has emerged as the go-to tool among university graduates to find jobs. Small businesses will have an edge in attracting and hiring the right talent with job postings and company pages on LinkedIn.

Conclusion

Entrepreneurs these days need to promote themselves as well as their business offerings on multiple social media platforms. LinkedIn has grown to be one of the most important channels and can no longer be treated as an option. Every business should establish its presence and start engaging with its customers and prospective clients on LinkedIn to enjoy growth and success. 

To see how LinkedIn can help your small business in branding, marketing or sales, start with the LinkedIn page for small businesses


Sources

LinkedIn Is No Longer Optional For Small Businesses. Hootsuite Social Media Management. 2014. Accessed June 09, 2016.
Matar, Ali. Tips For Small Business Owners to Leverage LinkedIn. Entrepreneur. 2015. Accessed June 09, 2016.
How Small Businesses Can Leverage
Linkedin. Small Business Trends. 2014. Accessed June 09, 2016.
Wagner, Kurt. LinkedIn: 81% of Small and Medium-Sized Businesses Use Social Media. Mashable. 2014. Accessed June 09, 2016.
7 Advanced LinkedIn Strategies for B2B Marketing by Neil Patel. Neil Patel. Accessed June 09, 2016.
Your Guide to Unleashing Killer Content Marketing on LinkedIn." Accessed June 09, 2016.

According to data released from LinkedIn in 2016, the platform has more than 433 million users in over 200 countries around the world. Based on a study of more than 5000 businesses, HubSpot reported that LinkedIn has the highest visitor-to-lead conversion rate at 2.74%. This number is much higher when compared to other platforms like Twitter (.69%) and Facebook (.77%).

What do numbers mean to an entrepreneur or a small business? LinkedIn is no longer an optional platform but an important channel to promote your profile and business. This post examines how LinkedIn can be utilized in a unique way when compared to other social media channels.       

1. Create a personal brand

At its core, LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking service. You can use it to create a personal brand and establish yourself as an expert in any field. A LinkedIn profile acts as a marketing presentation of your professional accomplishments and can help break down barriers and establish connections with others.     

2. Write engaging content

With LinkedIn publishing, the platform is now a leading channel where content resides. Many influencers and business owners publish content on LinkedIn to keep their network engaged. Writing original content also acts as a Search Engine Optimization (SEO) strategy, as articles that are published have a good chance of being picked up by Google indexing. Hence, being ranked higher in a Google Search provides more opportunity to engage with your network as well as potential customers.

3. Get insights on clients

With profile data such as a job title, years of experience, industry involved, etc. LinkedIn provides deep insight about potential customers. This is especially true if the small business is based on a Business to Business (B2B) model. According to an August 2014 study by Content Marketing Institute (CMI) and MarketingProfs, B2B marketers rated LinkedIn as the most effective (63%) platform for distributing content.     

4. Engage with customers presale and after sale

According to a study from Regalix, July 2015, LinkedIn is the most effective platform for customer engagement both during pre-sale (64%) and post-sale (51%). Be it publishing content, introducing a product or service offering, or writing how-to guides, LinkedIn can help to reach customer throughout the sales cycle. Moreover, a personal profile and company page will act as a repository for educating customers.   

5. Seek advice, hire talent

LinkedIn is not only a platform to sell but to seek expert opinions or to hire people who can contribute to the success of a business. LinkedIn experts in various disciplines such as entrepreneurship, start-up growth, and many more can be reached for advice if you are well connected. LinkedIn also has emerged as the go-to tool among university graduates to find jobs. Small businesses will have an edge in attracting and hiring the right talent with job postings and company pages on LinkedIn.

Conclusion

Entrepreneurs these days need to promote themselves as well as their business offerings on multiple social media platforms. LinkedIn has grown to be one of the most important channels and can no longer be treated as an option. Every business should establish its presence and start engaging with its customers and prospective clients on LinkedIn to enjoy growth and success. 

To see how LinkedIn can help your small business in branding, marketing or sales, start with the LinkedIn page for small businesses


Sources

LinkedIn Is No Longer Optional For Small Businesses. Hootsuite Social Media Management. 2014. Accessed June 09, 2016.
Matar, Ali. Tips For Small Business Owners to Leverage LinkedIn. Entrepreneur. 2015. Accessed June 09, 2016.
How Small Businesses Can Leverage
Linkedin. Small Business Trends. 2014. Accessed June 09, 2016.
Wagner, Kurt. LinkedIn: 81% of Small and Medium-Sized Businesses Use Social Media. Mashable. 2014. Accessed June 09, 2016.
7 Advanced LinkedIn Strategies for B2B Marketing by Neil Patel. Neil Patel. Accessed June 09, 2016.
Your Guide to Unleashing Killer Content Marketing on LinkedIn." Accessed June 09, 2016.

ICPSR is pleased to announce the official debut of the website for the Archive of Data on Disability to Enable Policy and research (ADDEP).

The Center for Large Data Research and Data Sharing in Rehabilitation (CLDR) and ICPSR have been working together to develop ADDEP, a data repository that supports disability and rehabilitation research. On the ADDEP website, users can explore existing disability data resources already available at ICPSR, and newly acquired data from rehabilitation medicine and related areas. With input from the CLDR, ADDEP will continue to find ways to improve and facilitate collaborative research opportunities for investigators, policymakers, and practitioners by providing access to existing disability and rehabilitation datasets for secondary analyses.

The CLDR involves a consortium of investigators from the University of Texas Medical Branch, Cornell University, and the University of Michigan. ADDEP is supported by grant P2CHD065702 awarded to the CLDR by the NIH – National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, through the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Researchers can explore and download curated data, archive and share their data, learn about training opportunities, and more at icpsr.umich.edu/addep.

On Sunday, June 26, there will be a building wide power shutdown of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre for high voltage maintenance. The building will be closed and the exterior doors locked from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. General study areas in IKBLC will re-open on June 26 at 4 p.m. and will remain open until 1 a.m.

Please check the Library Hours and Locations Portal for information on Library services in IKBLC and plan accordingly. Regular building hours will resume on Monday, June 27.

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