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Scholarship by academic librarians advances the fields of library and information science, influences practices of aligned professions, and informs effective advocacy. In support of broad and timely dissemination of library and information science scholarship, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) encourages academic librarians to publish in open access journals. When academic librarians choose to publish in subscription-based journals, ACRL recommends a standard practice of depositing the final accepted manuscript in a repository to make that version openly accessible. The author should be responsible for determining at what date the deposited manuscript becomes openly accessible, taking into account applicable institutional or funder policies, as well as other relevant considerations. ACRL further encourages academic librarians to make other forms of scholarship, such as monographs, presentations, grey literature, and data, openly accessible.

 

It is also imperative that publishers of library and information science scholarship explore and implement publishing models to make their content openly accessible as soon as possible. Librarians who are editors, reviewers, and authors should assist with this effort by engaging with their publishers about these models.

 

Read the full press release here

 

Find UBC Library research help here

 

Want to make your UBC research openly accessible? Visit cIRcle

 

Above image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license

Library_Wordle

 

Scholarship by academic librarians advances the fields of library and information science, influences practices of aligned professions, and informs effective advocacy. In support of broad and timely dissemination of library and information science scholarship, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) encourages academic librarians to publish in open access journals. When academic librarians choose to publish in subscription-based journals, ACRL recommends a standard practice of depositing the final accepted manuscript in a repository to make that version openly accessible. The author should be responsible for determining at what date the deposited manuscript becomes openly accessible, taking into account applicable institutional or funder policies, as well as other relevant considerations. ACRL further encourages academic librarians to make other forms of scholarship, such as monographs, presentations, grey literature, and data, openly accessible.

 

It is also imperative that publishers of library and information science scholarship explore and implement publishing models to make their content openly accessible as soon as possible. Librarians who are editors, reviewers, and authors should assist with this effort by engaging with their publishers about these models.

 

Read the full press release here

 

Find UBC Library research help here

 

Want to make your UBC research openly accessible? Visit cIRcle

 

Above image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license

The Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) presents:

An Introduction to the Economic Census Data of China

Join the webinar on August 3rd, 2016 at 1:00 PM EDT.

Register now!

The economic census data of China provides rich and comprehensive information for economic sectors of China; however, most of those data are usually not accessible to scholars since those data are not available in official publications. In a collaboration with the All China Marketing Research Co. and the National Bureau of Statistics of China, the UM China Data Center has released a series of economic census data products and services, including 2001 business census data, and 2004 and 2008 economic Census data. This workshop will give an introduction to the economic census data of China, discuss the primary differences between the US economic census data and China economic census data, describe the methodology for building GIS-based census data products and the technology for integrating those economic census data from different years in a web-based spatial system for easy access and analysis. It will also discuss some applications of those economic census data, possible limitations of those census data products, and the potential of future applications.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with more information about joining the webinar. 

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