TMW_2015_img

 

If you attended or heard about the first Tailings and Mine Waste 2011 conference (TMW) which arrived in cIRcle in 2011, then you will want to check out the upcoming TMW 2015 conference proceedings to be archived in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository.

 

Leading experts from all over the globe attended the Tailings and Mine Waste 2015 conference – hosted by UBC’s Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining Engineering, in conjunction with Colorado State University and the University of Alberta – and was held in Vancouver, British Columbia on October 25-28, 2015.

 

Having over 30 years’ experience himself in research, teaching and consulting in tailings and mined earth structures, the conference Chair and University of British Columbia Professor, Dr. Dirk van Zyl noted that the conference was going to be “exciting and informative” as it would feature “technical specialists sharing the highest standards of technical, environmental, safety and social practices in North America and around the world.”

 

Sharing the latest, innovative ways for sustainable tailings and mine waste management well into the future by offering the best practices, case histories, timely topics and technologies possible, these experts engaged a wide audience – from student to faculty researchers, scientists and engineers to mine waste managers, regulators, professional agencies and others in the mining industry.

 

Key topics presented in the 90+ accepted abstracts included timely topics such as “mine waste facilities design, management systems planning, case histories, environmental engineering, closure and reclamation”.

 

What’s next? Watch for Part II of our TMW 2015 conference proceedings’ blog post coming soon!

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Interested in other openly accessible mining conference proceedings from 1977 to the present?

Explore the British Columbia Mine Reclamation Symposia proceedings here

 

 

TMW_2015_img

 

If you attended or heard about the first Tailings and Mine Waste 2011 conference (TMW) which arrived in cIRcle in 2011, then you will want to check out the upcoming TMW 2015 conference proceedings to be archived in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository.

 

Leading experts from all over the globe attended the Tailings and Mine Waste 2015 conference – hosted by UBC’s Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining Engineering, in conjunction with Colorado State University and the University of Alberta – and was held in Vancouver, British Columbia on October 25-28, 2015.

 

Having over 30 years’ experience himself in research, teaching and consulting in tailings and mined earth structures, the conference Chair and University of British Columbia Professor, Dr. Dirk van Zyl noted that the conference was going to be “exciting and informative” as it would feature “technical specialists sharing the highest standards of technical, environmental, safety and social practices in North America and around the world.”

 

Sharing the latest, innovative ways for sustainable tailings and mine waste management well into the future by offering the best practices, case histories, timely topics and technologies possible, these experts engaged a wide audience – from student to faculty researchers, scientists and engineers to mine waste managers, regulators, professional agencies and others in the mining industry.

 

Key topics presented in the 90+ accepted abstracts included timely topics such as “mine waste facilities design, management systems planning, case histories, environmental engineering, closure and reclamation”.

 

What’s next? Watch for Part II of our TMW 2015 conference proceedings’ blog post coming soon!

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Interested in other openly accessible mining conference proceedings from 1977 to the present?

Explore the British Columbia Mine Reclamation Symposia proceedings here

 

 

digital signage image CCC 2016

Take part in the UBC Welcome Centre Campus Culture Challenge from September 1st to October 14th. Adventure around campus, complete challenges, and win great prizes!

At the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, come in to the 2nd floor foyer and take a photo of any of the display cases from the current exhibit Mexiquense Popular Art and tweet it with the hashtag #IKBLC.  Take it to the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre for your stamp!

View the information sheet below or download the passport here.

campus challenge 1 Campus challenge 2

Participants must complete the following challenge to receive a stamp for the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (no exceptions):

  • Post a photo on Twitter of you in front of the Mexico Fest art exhibit display on the second floor of the IKBLC. Tag #IKBLC

Participants must then go to the UBC Welcome Centre (Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre) to have their challenge verified to receive their stamp.

  • Staff will confirm that the challenge has been completed.
  • Staff will then stamp overtop of the logo or info paragraph of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
  • Only ONE stamp is awarded per individual

Frequently Asked Questions:

Who can complete the challenge?
This contest is open to current UBC students, staff, and faculty (valid UBC ID is required when submitting your stamped passport). Other individuals are welcome to complete the passport, but will not be entered into the draws. Only one submitted passport per individual.

How do you collect stamps?
Stamps can be collected by completing the associated challenge at participating venues between September 1st and October 14th. Collect your stamps at the locations and times noted in the venue descriptions. You must prove that you completed the challenge to get the stamp (usually this means showing your social media post on your phone). Note: stamps for the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and for the Under 19 Koerner’s Pub can be collected at the UBC Welcome Centre.

How do the prizes work?
The Grand prize draw will include all eligible booklets that contain 17 or more stamps, the second draw will include all eligible booklets that contain 12 or more stamps (including those who did not win in the first draw), the third draw will include all eligible booklets that contain 7 or more stamps (including those who did not win in the first and second draws). The draws will only contain eligible booklets that are received before 6pm, Oct. 21st at the UBC Welcome Centre, 1st Floor Welcome Desk, 6163 University Boulevard, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z1. Any additional costs or expenses incurred redeeming the prize(s) that are not specifically covered by the prize are the responsibility of the winners.

Can you tell me about the standard liability piece?B
None of the participating venues, UBC, alumni UBC, prize contributors or their respective agents or representatives shall be responsible in any way for the use of or bear any liability whatsoever in any way attributable to a prize awarded in the contest.

I still have a question. Can you help me?
For any questions or clarifications, please contact the UBC Welcome Centre front desk at 604-822-3313, alumni.ubc@ubc.ca or in person at the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre.

 

Shannon Selin and her novel Napoleon in America

After a successful and varied career that included non-fiction writing, university research, technical writing, and working for the Canadian government, UBC alumna Shannon Selin finally returned to her first love — writing fiction. Her first novel Napoleon in America imagines what might have happened if Napoleon Bonaparte had escaped from exile on St. Helena and wound up in the United States in 1821.  We spoke with Shannon about the extensive research she does for her books and how UBC Library and Collections have played a crucial role.

Which sources did you use in your research for Napoleon in America

UBC Library has been invaluable to my research. I write historical fiction set in Europe and North America in the early 1800s. Since I try to make my novels and short stories as believable as possible, I use only actual historical characters and embed them very carefully in the social, political and geographical context of the time. I am thus particularly interested in relevant letters, diaries, memoirs, travellers’ accounts and newspapers, as well as historical maps, paintings and drawings. In addition to standard books about European and North American history, the library has a marvelous selection of relatively obscure works that I was surprised to find in Vancouver. Three of my favourites are: Papiers Intimes et Journal du Duc de Reichstadt by Jean de Bourgoing, a collection of letters, diary entries and schoolwork by Napoleon Bonaparte’s son, who died at the age of 21; The Indians of Texas in 1830 by French naturalist Jean-Louis Berlandier, which includes gorgeous plates and descriptions of the native Americans Berlandier encountered during an 1828-29 expedition; and Mexico 1825-1828: The Journal and Correspondence of Edward Thornton Tayloe, the record of an American diplomat who had adroit powers of observation. The real “shivers up the spine” moment came when I was holding a letter from Napoleon, written in 1814, and three letters from the Duke of Wellington, written in 1824, all part of the Derek Lukin Johnston collection housed in Rare Books and Special Collections.

A letter dictated by Napoleon c 1814. Note his signature at the bottom right.

A letter dictated by Napoleon c 1814. Note his signature at the bottom right.

 

Do you use UBC’s Open Collections?

I do, particularly the Andrew McCormick Maps and Prints from RBSC, which has excellent 19th century maps of the British possessions in North America. Having online access to these resources is extremely helpful. I can zoom in to see features even more clearly than I could if I were viewing the maps in person.

Can you shed some light on your research-to-writing process?

For Napoleon in America, I started by reading a lot of books about Napoleon, particularly about his time on St. Helena. What physical shape was he in? What frame of mind was he in? If someone plucked him up and carried him away, what would he be likely to say and do? I then read up on the other characters who appear in the novel – people like the Duke of Wellington, Louis XVIII, Napoleon’s siblings, the Marquis de Lafayette, John Quincy Adams, pirate Jean Laffite, and the French officers who fled to the United States after Napoleon’s defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. Since the book moves between St. Helena, various European settings and North America, I also did research on each of these places in the early 1820s, to help me imagine what it might have been like to be there. As I read, I made notes on each topic and jotted down ideas of things that could happen in the book. Based on this, I came up with an outline of the plot, and then started drafting the novel. When questions came up as I was writing each chapter, I delved into more esoteric topics: early 19th-century medical practices, the history of voodoo in New Orleans, the diplomacy surrounding the Congress of Verona, etc. This in turn sparked more ideas for scenes in the book. It is really a continuous process, in which the research and writing are closely intertwined. For Napoleon in Texas, the sequel, I have six books from UBC Library open on my desk right now, looking at questions like: What plants and animals would one encounter on a trek between Laredo and San Antonio in the early 1820s? How long would the journey by horse take, compared to the journey by mule? What kind of kit would a Mexican officer be carrying?

Do you have a favourite spot or branch of UBC Library?

Given my interest in history, it’s probably no surprise to learn that my favourite place in the UBC Library is the part that remains from the old Main Library – what is now the Chapman Learning Commons. During my first summer at UBC, I worked as a research assistant to Professor Paul Marantz in the Political Science Department. Part of my job entailed making notes from books that could not be taken out of the Ridington Room. Not to be confused with the current room of that name, this was the old humanities and social sciences reading room, located in the north wing of the Main Library. I sat at one of the long wooden tables, with the light streaming through the high windows, surrounded by portraits of UBC chancellors and the smell of old books. It was peaceful and beautiful, and being in the heritage core of the library reminds me of that space.

Borrow Napoleon in America from UBC Library.

Follow Shannon’s writing at shannonselin.com. 

 

Canadian Art covers UBC Library's newest acquisition, which is an example of Morris’s arts-and-crafts approach to illustration, featuring unusual typeface and intricate decoration.
"As a public university, these are British Columbians’ books," Katherine Kalsbeek, Head of Rare Books and Special Collections tells Montecristo Magazine.

Online retail stores are virtual establishments that sell a variety of consumer or business-to-business products through e-commerce transactions. Online stores allow an owner to reach a larger and more geographically diverse group of potential consumers - and can lower operating costs by eliminating the need to rent or lease a brics and mortar storefront location. As e-commerce continues to grow in popularity, the opportunities for successful online businesses will also expand.

Industry Overview

BC

Data released by BCStats for June 2016 indicated a growth of 2.4% in retail sales in BC between March and April. This is a healthy trend after a decline in sales in the previous month’s data. As retail is the key industry to influence growth in e-commerce, this is an encouraging statistic.

Canada

According to a 2015 eMarketer report, retail sales in Canada are expected to grow at a rate of 2% annually until 2018. Retail e-commerce sales are also expected to grow at a much higher rate of around 13%. Overall, Canada ranks eighth worldwide in terms of e-commerce activity and according to a 2016 eMarketer report, one of the biggest barriers for e-commerce adoption in Canada is high shipping costs. Nearly 65% of consumers indicated shipping concerns as the main reason not to shop online.

Industry trends and challenges

One of the key trends in online retailing, according to an IBISWorld E-Commerce Report, is accessibility to the Internet. Easy access to the Internet through smartphones is an influential factor in increasing online retail sales. The total number of fixed broadband connections, a measure of internet use, is expected to reach 14.1 million in 2021 with improved public Wi-Fi access also encouraging consumers connect to the Internet. As a result, more and more consumers will turn to the Internet to shop.

According to a forecast by Euromonitor, Home Improvement and Gardening is projected to be the retail category with the highest e-commerce growth over the next five years. This category is expected to have a value growth of 286.3% from 2015 to 2020. This is an encouraging trend for anyone looking to open an online shopping business in this area.

Resources

Associations

Magazines & trade journals

Additional resources

If you would like to access more resources, the Online Retail Accelerator Guide is designed to help prospective and existing business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics Guide, it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why it is important.

Related guides

Image source: E-Commerce Visa (Test tamron 17-50 2.8) created by Fosforix on November 6, 2008. Protected by a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic license. Last accessed August 29, 2016. 

Online retail stores are virtual establishments that sell a variety of consumer or business-to-business products through e-commerce transactions. Online stores allow an owner to reach a larger and more geographically diverse group of potential consumers - and can lower operating costs by eliminating the need to rent or lease a brics and mortar storefront location. As e-commerce continues to grow in popularity, the opportunities for successful online businesses will also expand.

Industry Overview

BC

Data released by BCStats for June 2016 indicated a growth of 2.4% in retail sales in BC between March and April. This is a healthy trend after a decline in sales in the previous month’s data. As retail is the key industry to influence growth in e-commerce, this is an encouraging statistic.

Canada

According to a 2015 eMarketer report, retail sales in Canada are expected to grow at a rate of 2% annually until 2018. Retail e-commerce sales are also expected to grow at a much higher rate of around 13%. Overall, Canada ranks eighth worldwide in terms of e-commerce activity and according to a 2016 eMarketer report, one of the biggest barriers for e-commerce adoption in Canada is high shipping costs. Nearly 65% of consumers indicated shipping concerns as the main reason not to shop online.

Industry trends and challenges

One of the key trends in online retailing, according to an IBISWorld E-Commerce Report, is accessibility to the Internet. Easy access to the Internet through smartphones is an influential factor in increasing online retail sales. The total number of fixed broadband connections, a measure of internet use, is expected to reach 14.1 million in 2021 with improved public Wi-Fi access also encouraging consumers connect to the Internet. As a result, more and more consumers will turn to the Internet to shop.

According to a forecast by Euromonitor, Home Improvement and Gardening is projected to be the retail category with the highest e-commerce growth over the next five years. This category is expected to have a value growth of 286.3% from 2015 to 2020. This is an encouraging trend for anyone looking to open an online shopping business in this area.

Resources

Associations

Magazines & trade journals

Additional resources

If you would like to access more resources, the Online Retail Accelerator Guide is designed to help prospective and existing business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out our Business Research Basics Guide, it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why it is important.

Related guides

Image source: E-Commerce Visa (Test tamron 17-50 2.8) created by Fosforix on November 6, 2008. Protected by a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic license. Last accessed August 29, 2016. 

War_Stories3b-page-001


War Stories is a free special event to be held on Thursday, September 15, 2016, 7:00pm at the Goldcorp Stage at the BMO Theatre Centre. Sponsored by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, the Global Reporting Centre and the Movember Foundation.

War Stories from Afghanistan, Iraq and other conflict zones told by foreign correspondents, combat veterans and scholars. Award-winning Iraqi-Canadian photojournalist Farah Nosh and writer/photographer Ann Jones will share images and stories of the impact of war on civilians. Wall Distinguished Professor and UBC Geography Professor, Derek Gregory, will discuss changes in the evacuation of war casualties from battlefields over the past century. Contact! Unload, directed by Wall Scholar and UBC Theatre Education Professor, George Belliveau, will feature Canadian veterans depicting what it means to transition home after overseas service. The play highlights Marv Westwood’s Veteran’s Transition Program and artist Foster Eastman’s Lest We Forget Canada! mural. Moderated by Emmy Award winning journalist and UBC Journalism Professor Peter Klein. Following the presentations, the performers will engage with the audience in a discussion about the different perspectives and approaches to sharing war stories, and the value of storytelling’s ability to chronicle, enlighten and heal.

Register for this free event at: war-stories.eventbrite.com.

The Law Library is offering the following training sessions for current Allard School of Law students and faculty.

WestlawNext Canada

  • Monday, September 19, 2016 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
  • Wednesday, September 21, 2016 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Lexis Advance Quicklaw (*NEW* interface with that replaces LexisNexis Quicklaw)

  • Monday, September 26, 2016 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
  • Wednesday, September 28, 2016 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

To register, please see Law – Commercial Databases Training Sessions

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