Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. At the December 2015 Paris climate conference (COP21), 195 countries agreed to reduce their carbon emissions and limit global climate change. While the agreement was ambitious, it also recognized that less developed countries would require more time to begin reducing their emissions. While some question whether it is fair to hold them to the same standard as societies that grew wealthy from carbon-driven industry, it is also clear that many of these countries have the most to lose. What structural changes need to be made to allow less developed countries to combat climate change as equal partners? Are there technologies that will allow them to leapfrog carbon and achieve sustainable economic growth?

Join us for a provocative UBC Dialogues program where experts will examine the challenges and opportunities facing less developed countries in the years ahead.

This event took place at the Telus garden on September 19, 2016.

Moderator

Lisa Johnson, BSc’02, MJ’04– Reporter, CBC News

Panelists

Simon Donner– Associate Professor, UBC Department of Geography

Sumeet Gulati– Associate Professor in Environmental and Resource Economics at the UBC Faculty of Land & Food Systems

Sybil Seitzinger– Director, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions

Martino Tran– Assistant Professor, UBC School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP); Associate Faculty Member, UBC Department of Civil Engineering.

Biographies

Lisa Johnson, BSC’02, MJ/04

Lisa Johnson is a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver. She specializes in science and environment stories, from E. coli and isotopes to carbon offsets and killer whales. As a general assignment news reporter, she’s also covered kidnappings, earthquakes, and has won a RTDNA award for her live reports from the Stanley Cup Riot. lisa-johnson-320x320

Before she became a storyteller, Lisa thought she was going to be a scientist. She graduated from UBC with an Honours degree in biology after pipetting stickleback DNA, counting kelp, and watching fish mating dances.

She returned to UBC for her master’s in journalism, focusing on science and risk communications. She still takes interest in things that many journalists hate, including animal carcasses and math.

Simon Donner

simon-donnerSimon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at UBC, as well as an associate in UBC’s Liu Institute for Global Issues, Biodiversity Research Centre and Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability and the Atmospheric Sciences Program. He came to UBC after a few years in the Science, Technology and Environment Program in the Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He spent his undergraduate days at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. He also did a master’s degree in the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University and a PhD in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin with the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment.

 

 

 Sumeet Gulati

Sumeet Gulati is the Associate Professor in Environmental and Resourcesumeet-gulati-320x571 Economics at the University of British Columbia, studying the economics of urban transportation. Sumeet completed his BA in Economics at the University of Mumbai and then his Masters at the University of Delhi before moving to the USA to complete his PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of Maryland.

Sumeet’s other research interests include; the impact of international trade on the environment, the effectiveness of Carbon Taxes and the Environmental Policy and the cost-effectiveness of programs designed to improve energy–efficiency.

Along with his co-authors Sumeet asks: at their modest values, do carbon taxes reduce gasoline consumption? Do they encourage people to buy fuel efficient vehicles? Do older consumers, especially women, perform better or worse while negotiating a price for a new car? What are the economics of car sharing—like Car2Go, and Evo? And what explains the autonomous emergence of electric rickshaws in India?

Sybil Seitzinger

sybil-seitzinger-320x448Dr. Sybil Seitzinger is the executive director of the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions and a professor in the School of Environmental Studies.

Dr. Seitzinger holds a PhD in biological oceanography from the University of Rhode Island and is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  She is highly cited, with more than 130 peer-reviewed publications to her credit.

Her research has centered on nutrient biogeochemistry in coastal marine and freshwater ecosystems, spanning a range of spatial scales from molecular level organic chemical characterization to models at global scales, with the impact of human activities being a common theme.  Through an international collaboration, a spatially explicit, multi-nutrient, watershed model, Global NEWS, was developed which has been applied to watersheds globally under a range of scenarios.  She has also dabbled in atmospheric chemistry, including aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation.

Dr. Seitzinger joins UVic from her position as executive director of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) based in Stockholm, Sweden. Her work at the IGBP involved facilitating and integrating the work of scientists and researchers across Africa, the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe on global environmental change.  Prior to that, she was director of the Rutgers/NOAA Cooperative Marine Education and Research Program and visiting professor at Rutgers University in the US. She served as president of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography from 2006-2010.

Martino Tran

Martino is Assistant Professor in Environmental Systems Science at themartino-tran School of Community and Regional Planning and Associate Faculty Member in the Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science. He is a Canada Research Chair nominee in Urban Systems and Co-Director on the Master of Engineering Leadership (MEL) at the University of British Columbia (UBC). He is also a Visiting Research Associate at the Environmental Change Institute and a former Oxford Martin Fellow at the University of Oxford.

He is broadly interested in applying environmental systems and engineering sciences for tackling societal challenges in energy and sustainability. This includes the application of systems theory, techno-economic analysis, and complex networks to assess long-term sustainability, risk and resilience in urban systems. Much of his work focuses on developing multi-scale decision support systems and integrated assessment modelling to inform climate and energy policy. Current focus areas include sustainable energy and transport systems, and interdependent infrastructure networks. He also lectures on Cities and Climate Change (PLAN 548S), and Urban Systems Analysis and Planning (URSY 520) at UBC.

Before arriving to UBC, Martino provided technical leadership and management for the UK Infrastructure Transitions Research Consortium (ITRC) a $10M program grant funded by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). He was responsible for integrated assessment focusing on model calibration, validation and simulation. He also made novel contributions to the development of multi-attribute, cross-sector performance metrics, and visualization techniques to assess infrastructure risk and interdependency. This work contributed to the first national infrastructure systems modelling capability to inform the UK government’s National Infrastructure Plan.

Martino has also led research for academia and industry on the large-scale deployment of smart energy and transport technologies, and has advised UNEP, UNDP and Hitachi Europe’s Smart Cities Program. He also collaborates with the UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC) tasked with informing UK energy and climate policy. He is a regular peer reviewer for Science and Nature.

Martino completed his PhD in Environmental Science specializing in mathematical modelling as an Oxford Martin Fellow jointly led by Engineering Sciences and the School of Geography and Environment, University of Oxford. His thesis applied systems engineering and complex network theory to model the long-term techno-economic performance of alternative fuelled vehicles for climate change mitigation. He received a European Commission Erasmus Mundus scholarship completing a MSc in Environmental Science at Lund University, Sweden specializing in energy systems analysis. Before academia he worked in industry focusing on environmental impact assessment for major energy and transport infrastructure projects.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Donner, S. D., & Mcdaniels, J. (2013). The influence of national temperature fluctuations on opinions about climate change in the U.S. since 1990. Climatic Change, 118(3-4), 537-550. [Link]

Gulati, S., & Roy, D. (2015). Free trade and the greening of domestic industry. Environment and Development Economics, 20(1), 1-19. [Link]

Weissbecker, I. (2011). Climate change and human well-being : Global challenges and opportunities Springer. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

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Studying or working at UBC Vancouver or UBC Okanagan?

 

If so, you will want to read the latest copyright at UBC information update just released yesterday – see directly below:

 

Copyright System Updates

 

As we look ahead to another academic year, UBC is taking this opportunity to re-engage with you on the issue of copyright.

 

Copyright law is not static. Over the coming two years, we are anticipating several developments in copyright law that will require continued vigilance on the part of faculty, staff and the university administration.

 

To promote best practices as the legal landscape develops, we have added an alerting system to Connect. The system will be implemented by individual Faculty through the rest of 2016.

 

Currently, instructors are prompted to input metadata indicating the copyright status of an uploaded file. This system is intended to assist faculty in keeping track of the copyright status of their uploads, to ensure an accurate record of permissions is maintained over time, and as courses evolve.

 

The new system will alert faculty members if any uploaded files are missing copyright metadata. This system also provides an opportunity for faculty members to review the material and remove any unnecessary content. To save time and effort, consider using the Library Online Course Reserves (LOCR) system, where trained staff will take care of scanning, uploading and clearing copyright on your behalf, including paying any required transactional license fees.

 

As you know, UBC has also created various tools to assist faculty to learn about, to use and to distribute copyrighted materials in compliance with copyright law. Further resources, as well as updates about changes in copyright law, can be found at http://copyright.ubc.ca.

 

If you have any questions about copyright please email copyright.services@ubc.ca and consider attending a workshop: http://copyright.ubc.ca/support/workshops/.

 

UBC remains committed to providing our academic community with the resources it needs to easily and legally access learning and research material. Thank you again for your efforts and support since we embarked on this course in 2011.

 

Angela Redish
Provost and Vice-President Academic pro tem (Vancouver)

 

Cynthia Mathieson
Provost and Vice-Principal Academic (Okanagan)

 

 

Get copyright at UBC help here

 

Want to make your UBC research openly accessible? Visit cIRcle

 

Above image is courtesy of UBC Library

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In recognition of UBC’s Centennial year, UBC Library and emeritus Tom Shorthouse are excited to announce the release of Golden Scrapbook: The Centennial Update 1965-2015. This extensive publication maps 50 years at UBC Library, highlighting personal accounts from University Librarians, milestones in the library’s history, and anecdotes from library employees past and present. Complimented by colour photographs of library employees, library spaces and events from the past 50 years, the scrapbook profiles the growth and development of the library, and follows the Scrapbook for a Golden Anniversary produced in 1966, also compiled by Tom Shorthouse, and published by the Morriss Printing Company.

View the Scrapbook

Read the digital version of the new Golden Scrapbook below. Hard copies of the publication will be available to borrow from the library beginning in early October, and a one copy will be held permanently in the University Librarian office wing. One copy will also be placed in the Centennial time capsule. To make an appointment to view the scrapbook in advance of the availability of the circulation copies, please email Jasmine Devonshire.

 

 

Recognition

Thank you to Tom Shorthouse for his extensive work compiling content, as well as to George Tsiakos for project support, and Erwin Wodarczak for fact checking.

Email Library Communications with questions

If you are living in British Columbia and require legal advice regarding small business or non-profit matters; have limited means of paying for legal advice; and can come to the University of British Columbia Campus in person for an appointment, the Bobinski  Business Law Clinic at the Peter A. Allard School of Law (the “Clinic”) at the University of British Columbia may be of interest to you.

The clinic was established in January 2016 as a pilot program with support provided by the Franklin Lew Innovation Fund. In September 2016 a generous funding commitment from Allard Law alumnus Robert P. Pirooz, Q.C. has enabled the Centre for Business Law to continue to operate the newly named Bobinski Business Law Clinic through spring 2017. Mr. Pirooz chose to name the Clinic in honour of former law school Dean, Professor Mary Anne Bobinski.

This program provides segments of the business community, who have limited means, with access to supervised business-oriented legal services at no cost. Legal services at the clinic are provided by law students and are tailored to each client’s unique legal needs, but may include such things as:

  • Answering general legal questions regarding small business or non-profit matters
  • Reviewing an existing contract or lease and explaining what it means to the client
  • Explaining the difference between various business structures including a sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation
  • Other business oriented legal advice related to a client’s unique legal issue

The Clinic may also draft legal documents, including but not limited to:

  • Constitution, by-laws and incorporation forms for a non-profit society
  • Articles, resolutions, registers and share certificates for a private company
  • Partnership Agreements
  • Non-competition Agreements
  • Confidentiality Agreements
  • Supplier Agreements
  • Offers of employment
  • Privacy Policies

The Clinic operates during the law school’s winter session, which consists of a two terms: September to December and January to April. Each term, six upper year law students participate in the Clinic, which provides them with the opportunity to gain valuable client-facing experience. The students are supervised by two accomplished supervising lawyers, Christine Baron and Catherine Chow. Ms. Baron is a sole practitioner and a large portion of her practice involves assisting small businesses and non-profit societies with a variety of legal matters, including incorporations, leases, and non-competition agreements. Ms. Chow is Vice President and General Counsel at Keg Restaurants Ltd, where her broad portfolio includes financing, business development, trademark protection, and real estate.

If you are interested in applying to become a client, please fill out the online application form, or for more detailed information, the Clinic's website.

If you are living in British Columbia and require legal advice regarding small business or non-profit matters; have limited means of paying for legal advice; and can come to the University of British Columbia Campus in person for an appointment, the Bobinski  Business Law Clinic at the Peter A. Allard School of Law (the “Clinic”) at the University of British Columbia may be of interest to you.

The clinic was established in January 2016 as a pilot program with support provided by the Franklin Lew Innovation Fund. In September 2016 a generous funding commitment from Allard Law alumnus Robert P. Pirooz, Q.C. has enabled the Centre for Business Law to continue to operate the newly named Bobinski Business Law Clinic through spring 2017. Mr. Pirooz chose to name the Clinic in honour of former law school Dean, Professor Mary Anne Bobinski.

This program provides segments of the business community, who have limited means, with access to supervised business-oriented legal services at no cost. Legal services at the clinic are provided by law students and are tailored to each client’s unique legal needs, but may include such things as:

  • Answering general legal questions regarding small business or non-profit matters
  • Reviewing an existing contract or lease and explaining what it means to the client
  • Explaining the difference between various business structures including a sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation
  • Other business oriented legal advice related to a client’s unique legal issue

The Clinic may also draft legal documents, including but not limited to:

  • Constitution, by-laws and incorporation forms for a non-profit society
  • Articles, resolutions, registers and share certificates for a private company
  • Partnership Agreements
  • Non-competition Agreements
  • Confidentiality Agreements
  • Supplier Agreements
  • Offers of employment
  • Privacy Policies

The Clinic operates during the law school’s winter session, which consists of a two terms: September to December and January to April. Each term, six upper year law students participate in the Clinic, which provides them with the opportunity to gain valuable client-facing experience. The students are supervised by two accomplished supervising lawyers, Christine Baron and Catherine Chow. Ms. Baron is a sole practitioner and a large portion of her practice involves assisting small businesses and non-profit societies with a variety of legal matters, including incorporations, leases, and non-competition agreements. Ms. Chow is Vice President and General Counsel at Keg Restaurants Ltd, where her broad portfolio includes financing, business development, trademark protection, and real estate.

If you are interested in applying to become a client, please fill out the online application form, or for more detailed information, the Clinic's website.

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