This session aims to identify ways to support and promote accurate information about Aboriginal people, identify how current library structures may be barriers to full inclusion for Aboriginal students and how to address them, and identify power issues at play in our own instructional practice and how to make positive changes. Panelists are asked to consider the following questions:

How do you help your community find themselves in your collection or in your course?
How do you Indigenize your instruction?


Panelists

Deborah Lee is a Cree, Mohawk and Métis librarian. She worked as a Reference Librarian at the National Library of Canada / Library and Archives Canada for seven years. In 2007, Deborah became the Indigenous Studies Portal Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been the Indigenous Studies Liaison and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UofS since 2011. Deborah has presented widely at local, national and international conferences, including ACRL in 2015.

Patricia Geddes is the Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian at Vancouver Island University. She is a Liaison Librarian for Aboriginal Education Services, First Nations Studies, and the Faculty of Academic and Career Preparation.

Jenna Walsh was born in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish territory and grew up in an inner city neighbourhood with a diverse Aboriginal population. At the University of British Columbia, her Interdisciplinary BA focused on global Indigeneity, and she did the First Nations Curriculum Concentration program for her MLIS.

Kim Lawson is Heiltsuk with English/ Danish ancestry. She is one of the authors of the “Protocols for Native American Archival Materials,” was the Archivist/ Librarian at The Union of BC Indian Chiefs Resource Centre, has an MLIS from UBC and is learning to speak Heiltsuk.

Camille Callison is a member of the Tahltan First Nation and the Indigenous Services Librarian & Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies and Social Work at the University of Manitoba, Member of the UM Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC) and has presented extensively on Indigenous Library & Archives issues.

Moderator

Sarah Dupont’s ancestry is Metis, French, and British. She is from Prince George, BC and is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UBC Library, where she works in the Xwi7xwa Library and Irving K Barber Learning Centre. Her liaison areas include Indigenous Education and Indigenous Social Work. Sarah is the project manager for Indigitization, a UBC program to support First Nations digitization and preservation of their community resources.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Doerksen, K., Karen Doerksen, & Carla Martin. (03/01/2016). Partnership: A loose coupling: Aboriginal participation in library education – A selective literature review The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. doi:10.21083/partnership.v10i2.3337 [Link]

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Kelly, B., & Barbara Kelly. (01/01/2011). Partnership: Reflecting the lives of aboriginal women in canadian public library collection development The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Publishers, Distributors & News Media

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

 

 

 

Acknowledgement: The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is pleased to contribute to the promotion of this unique opportunity.  We acknowledge the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society’s website as the source for most of this content.

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society is an enterprising non-profit organization that develops and delivers transformative education inspired by Haida Gwaii. In partnership with leading universities, we offer students immersive, experiential learning opportunities in rural, resource-dependent communities in transition. Here the Haida Nation, island communities, and provincial and federal governments are working through complex joint management models towards reconciliation and sustainability.

Drawing on Haida Gwaii’s legacy of innovation and leadership, HGHES offers a range of programming including undergraduate semesters, executive education and professional development courses, research opportunities, public lectures and workshops, and more.

The Haida Gwaii Semesters include the following areas of focus:

  1. Natural Resource Science
  2. Natural Resource Studies
  3. Reconciliation Studies
  4. Marine Planning

Please visit http://hghes.ca/haida-gwaii-semesters/ for more information, including the application process, tuition, fees and FAQs

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society embraces a place-based approach; we see the social and ecological systems of Haida Gwaii as vibrant natural classrooms for our students to engage with, grounding course content in living, local case studies. We believe in working together and facilitating a rich collaboration between academics and local knowledge holders, supporting a meaningful learning exchange and the development of a broad perspective.

  • As issues around the globe become increasingly complex, If students are from UBC, there is an agreement in place to facilitate registration.
  • For non-UBC students there is an opportunity to earn UBC credits and transfer them back to the student’s home institution.

 

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE4199 .D64 2016
Adam Dodek, The Canadian Constitution, 2d ed. (Toronto: Dundurn, 2016).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KF250 .G375 2013
Bryan A. Garner et al., The Redbook: A Manual on Legal Style, 3d ed. (St. Paul: West Academic Publishing, 2013).

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