This growing French language collection is one of the newest editions to Xwi7xwa Library. These resources are meant to support educators and students with integrating Aboriginal ways of knowing and learning within the mandate of the new BC curriculum. In its present state, the majority of the titles in this section are geared towards children and young adults. Many of the titles in the French language collection also discuss residential schools and their impacts. Original French language titles are available in addition to translated works.

Post authored by student librarian, Christina Wac.

Research Day showcases the contributions of the iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

Questions about social media as sources of information about individuals (of different ages, genders, backgrounds) and communities, their uses in our personal and professional lives, and impact on our practices and overall well-being are central to the work of students and scholars across all our iSchool programs. Recognizing this common ground, this year’s Research Day will focus on the broad topic of “information, social media, and well-being,” considering the many connections social media now have with the way we do information, library, and archival studies.

This event happened on March 10, 2017.


Speaker:

Lyle Ungar, Professor of Computer And Information Science, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in multiple departments in the Schools of Business, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering and Applied Science.  Lyle received a B.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.  He has published over 200 articles, supervised two dozen PhD students, and is co-inventor on eleven patents. His current research focuses on developing scalable machine learning methods for data mining and text mining, including spectral methods for NLP, and analysis of social media to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being.

“Social media such as Twitter and Facebook provide a rich, if imperfect portal onto people’s lives.  We analyze tens of millions of Facebook posts and billions of tweets to study variation in language use with age, gender, personality, and mental and physical well-being.  Word clouds visually illustrate the big five personality traits (e.g., “What is it like to be neurotic?”), while correlations between language use and county level health data suggest connections between health and happiness, including potential psychological causes of heart disease.”


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Smith, R. J., Crutchley, P., Schwartz, H. A., Ungar, L., Shofer, F., Padrez, K. A., & Merchant, R. M. (2017). Variations in Facebook Posting Patterns Across Validated Patient Health Conditions: A Prospective Cohort Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(1), e7. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Kern, M. L., Park, G., Eichstaedt, J. C., Schwartz, H. A., Sap, M., Smith, L. K., & Ungar, L. H. (2016). Gaining insights from social media language: Methodologies and challenges. [Link]

Sinnenberg, L., DiSilvestro, C. L., Mancheno, C., Dailey, K., Tufts, C., Buttenheim, A. M., … & Asch, D. A. (2016). Twitter as a Potential Data Source for Cardiovascular Disease Research. Jama cardiology, 1(9), 1032-1036. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Brooks, S. (05/01/2015). Computers in human behavior: Does personal social media usage affect efficiency and well-being? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.053 [Link]

Gerson, J., Plagnol, A. C., & Corr, P. J. (10/01/2016). Computers in human behavior: Subjective well-being and social media use: Do personality traits moderate the impact of social comparison on facebook? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.023 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Computer Science

Information Visualization

 

The multi-disciplinary Cree artist Kent Monkman is well represented in the Xwi7xwa collection with the entirety of his video work: a collection of short films that span the past two decades and multiple film genres. Highlights of the video collection include Monkman’s debut, “A Nation is Coming,” and “A Taxonomy of the European Male,” which features his alter-ego, Miss Chief Eagle Testicles, as she travels Europe, interrogating the representation of Indigenous societies in classical European art. Monkman’s newest film, “Casualties of Modernity,” continues this examination of the art world, playfully looking at the history of modern art in the 20th century. Several films, such as “Seance” and Iskootao, document live performances pieces featuring Miss Chief Eagle Testicles.

Beyond his video work, the book “Two-Spirit Acts” collects the text of three of his performance pieces, along with work by other prominent Two-Spirit writers. The library also has examples of Monkman’s visual art through the exhibition catalogue “Kent Monkman: the Rise and Fall of Civilization.” Monkman’s talents extend to the realm of children’s literature with his bright illustrations of “A Coyote Columbus Story,” written by Thomas King.

Monkman’s exhibit, “Shame and Prejudice: A story of resilience,” was recently mounted at the University of Toronto as part of the 150 anniversary of Canada’s confederation projects. The exhibit will be touring over the next few years and is expected to come to the Museum of Anthropology at UBC in 2020.

Articles from some Oxford journals cannot be reached through Summon and the Citation Linker. Our vendor is working on restoring article level linking.

 

Work around:

If the “Full Text Online” link in Summon leads to the Citation Linker with “Browse Journal”, go back to the Summon results, click on “Preview” and then on the DOI, if present. This may link directly to the article.

Otherwise, when in the Citation Linker, click on “Browse Journal” and search for the article by title on the Oxford journal website.

Apologies for the inconvenience. Please continue to report problems via our Help Form.

 

Open Education Week is a celebration of the global Open Education Movement. Its goal is to raise awareness about the movement and its impact on teaching and learning worldwide. Attend one of the many Open Education events at UBC and UBC Library throughout March. 

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons    

Date & Location: March 18 at the Belkin Art Gallery

Time: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Date & Location: March 19 at the Western Front Society

Time: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Sign up to participate.

 

Open Scholarly Practice

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning.

Date & Location: March 27, Irving K Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Time: 12 to 1:30 p.m.

Register for the event.

 

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

 Join us to explore the goals, failures, and successes of open education. We’ll tackle such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Date & Location: March 28, Harbour Centre, Simon Fraser University, Room 1430

Time: 5:30 to 8 :45 p.m.

Register for the event.

 

[citation needed] – Librarians Improving Wikipedia

Date & Location: March 30, Terrace Lounge, iSchool, 4th Floor IKBLC

12:30 to 2:00 p.m.

Join us in celebration of Open Education Week for “Librarians Improving Wikipedia.” For an hour we will work together to add reliable citations to Wikipedia articles. Come for as long as you can. Light snacks will be available.

Register for the event.

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