Come join us for TEC (Technology Enhanced Classroom) Expo July 12th and July 13th  1:00-2:30 p.m. in the Scarfe building foyer! The events on these two days are free and open to all UBC students, staff and faculty members.

July 12th will feature Steps to a Virtual Stage, Stem Education Videos, Enhancing High Performance Coaching, Camtasia, Creating Multi-touch Books, Learner Competencies and Digital Badges and more.

July 13th is the Educational Maker Day.  It is a hands-on time for you to engage in both digital and non-digital creative making. Some activities this year include Anne Lama and Hannah Mckendry with Book Making and Elena Pederson, Seed Library, Virtual Reality (including an opportunity to try the HTC Vive from the brand new Emerging Media Lab!), Coding with Microbits, Button Making, Sensory Food Exploration, Knot Tying, Weaving, Jewellery Making and Robotics.

Web link: http://ets.educ.ubc.ca/tec-expo-2017/

This week on the blog, we’ll use Open Collections to search for some images. @VanBigTrees submitted this question on Twitter:

Let’s get started!

First, we’ll go to Open Collections at https://open.library.ubc.ca/

From here, we can start a search a few ways. Today, we’ll explore using the collections, and next week, we’ll work with keyword searches. First, let’s select the “Browse by Collection” button to see if there are any collections that might be helpful to us:

I chose to scroll through these collections and open up the Capilano Timber Company Fonds:

 

Since I’m looking for photos of old-growth forests, a logging company might feel counter-intuitive. One strategy among many is to search for the opposite of what you’re looking for: a logging company would need documentation of what was there before they cut it down.

This is the front page of the collection: Here you can see dates, subjects, and if you scroll, a brief overview of the collection. Since I don’t know what’s here, I’m going to search all the items in the collection; type an asterisk (*) in the search bar.

Here is the list of everything in the collection- all 151 items. Since I’m looking for images of forests, I’ll see what my options are in the “Subject” field over on the left hand side.

The most common subject, “Cedar Trees”, sounds like a good place to start. I’ll select that and then scroll through the images.

I like one entitled “Capilano Cedar”

An old-growth forest photo!! Come back next week for the next stage of the search: using subject terms and keywords.

recognition awards

UBC Library is pleased to announce that Hyunjoo Eom, Felicia de la Parra and Barbara Towell are the 2017 recipients of UBC Library Recognition Awards. The annual Library Recognition Awards program was developed to acknowledge the many ways in which Library staff contribute to their workplace through creativity, innovation, excellence and customer service.

The awards were presented at the annual Library Recognition Luncheon at the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre on June 27, 2017. Congratulations Hyunjoo, Felicia and Barbara, and thank you to their nominators!

employee awards

Hyunjoo Eom, Barbara Towell, interim University Librarian Melody Burton, and Felicia de la Parra.

 


Hyunjoo Eom


Hyunjoo Eom (Korean Collections Support Assistant, Technical Services) earned the Employee Excellence Award for her impeccable work ethic and attention to detail. All of her nominators emphasized the level of trust they have in her work, and her passion and commitment to the Library.

“It was remarkable to witness Hyunjoo’s total dedication to the daunting task at hand and to observe the grace with which she carried out her duties. She never complained, criticized or dramatized. Her competence as a cataloguer was sought after to solve the numerous cataloguing problems which arose,” says one nominator.

Hyunjoo worked diligently on a cataloging project over several years – inventorying thousands of materials, updating and fixing records, and helping move items. As a direct result of her work, UBC Library’s Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indic language, Indonesian, Tibetan and Persian collections have been greatly improved!

Felicia de la Parra

felicia
Felicia de la Parra (Library Assistant, Rare Books and Special Collections) is this year’s Unsung Hero. Felicia’s can-do attitude makes her a great team leader, and she is always striving to improve unit processes.

Felicia is a natural morale booster. She shows constant consideration and concern for colleagues, checking in to make sure they are thriving on both personal and professional levels,” says her nominator.

Always going the extra mile in contributing to the workplace, she has served on the various committees within the Library and is constantly working to make the workplace better for her colleague. Whether planning events or recognizing coworkers, Felicia’s care and understanding in her interactions with staff, students and community members make her an exemplary award recipient.

Barbara Towell

barbara
Barbara Towell (e-Records Manager, Records Management) received the Innovation Award for her work in educating colleagues in the Library and across the University. Barbara has consulted with units across campus to provide training in records management policies and procedures.

A colleague notes: “Even after my high initial expectations of someone in her field, I was impressed by Barbara’s focus, detail orientation, and organization. I have no doubt the same level of professionalism is shown to the units across campus Barbara meets with to consult on this same work.”

Barbara’s work on developing educational resources and training materials for records management procedures has established the Records Management Office as a key unit on campus. Her innovative ways of working with colleagues across campus make her a perfect fit for this year’s Innovation Award.

The Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection, one of our most well-known and beloved special collections, contains material related to three broad and interrelated themes: early British Columbia history, immigration and settlement and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. The collection contains a wide variety of documents, photographs, books, artifacts and maps related to each of these themes.

Selections from the collection are on display in RBSC, organized to show some of the most compelling stories of Canada’s past.

Early B.C. history:

Related to early B.C. history are rare editions of the narratives of many Pacific voyages of discovery including Valdes, Galiano, Malaspina, Cook and Vancouver. The exhibition also features charts recording the exploration of the Pacific Northwest.

Immigration and settlement:

The Fraser River gold rush that sparked Chinese immigration to British Columbia is highlighted through books and government documents relating to the restriction of such immigration. Chinese-Canadian cultural, social and economic life is displayed through archival documents, photographs and artifacts.

European immigration to Canada is illustrated with promotional brochures and posters encouraging settlers to the West, and archival material from the Clandonald colony in Alberta, a community of immigrants from the Scottish Hebrides.

Canadian Pacific Railway:

Documents, maps and publications show how the Canadian Pacific Railway was built, and how Vancouver was chosen as the western terminus. Photographs and accounts of the building of the railway are presented, along with vibrant posters promoting travel and tourism via C.P.R. rail and steamships. Beautiful examples of cruise ship memorabilia provide a glimpse of the style of the times.

The exhibition is open to the public, free of charge during Rare Books and Special Collections opening hours (Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.). Also, there is a drop-in tour of the Chung Collection room available every Thursday at 10 a.m. We hope to welcome you for a visit soon!

 

Photo: Susan Parker Don Liebig / UCLA Photography

 

In the News: UBC and Abroad

 

UBC appoints new University Librarian – Susan E. Parker

“Being named University Librarian at UBC is an honour, and the highlight of my career,” says Susan Parker. “I look forward to partnering with UBC’s excellent library staff, students, and faculty as we continue to develop and deliver outstanding services, scholarly resource collections, and welcoming library facilities for the UBC community.”

Read the full announcement here

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Compute Canada & CARL-Portage – Beta Testing of FRDR

Check out the new research management tool by The Federated Research Data Repository (FRDR). ‘A joint initiative led by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) and Compute Canada provid[ing] Canadian researchers a place to deposit large data sets and to improve the discovery of Canadian research data’.

Visit the FRDR beta testing site

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OA journals & Canadian universities

Canadian Universities Support Publication in and the Launching of Open Access Journals

“As Open Access journals gain in recognition across scholarly communities, Canadian universities voice increasingly vocal support for Open Access journals…”

Continue reading here

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New Research Data Centre opens at UNBC

Why are the graduate students and approved researchers smiling? It definitely has something to do with the new University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) Research Data Centre.

Learn more about UNBC’s Research Data Centre

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Increase the Impact

Beyond the Beyond: Can we Increase the Impact and Reach of Scholarly Research?

From stakeholders to voters, many folks are in need of greater access and transparency when it comes to research and research outcomes.  As noted by Vicky Williams, “with increasing funder mandates for research to demonstrate broader impact – on society, policy, the economy, or the environment – research has to reach a broader audience.”

Continue reading here

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OA in the Humanities

Why Is Open Access Moving So Slowly In The Humanities? By Peter Suber

While OA has made strides over the years via open access repositories (in physics) and open access journals (in biomedicine), Peter Suber provides some insight on the “nine differences between the humanities and the sciences”.

Read the first and second of his blog posts from the new series on Open Access in the Humanities” by Blog of the APA (The American Philosophical Association)

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Upcoming OA/OE Conferences

 

 

OpenCon 2017 in Berlin, Germany

OpenCon affords a unique opportunity for “students and early career academic professionals from across the world” to learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data” as well as to “develop critical skills, and catalyze action toward a more open system for sharing the world’s information—from scholarly and scientific research, to educational materials, to digital research data”.

 

OE Global 2018 in Delft, the Netherlands

The Open Education (OE) Global Conference is an “internationally diverse [one] devoted exclusively to open education, attracting researchers, practitioners, policy makers, educators and students from more than 35 countries to discuss and explore how Open Education advances educational practices around the world”.

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New BCcampus Annual Review

BCcampus 2016/17 Annual Review

Highlights of faculty and instructor partnerships and projects on the future of post-secondary learning and teaching in British Columbia

Read the review here

 

 

 

Upgrades to the third and fourth floors of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre are complete and opened to library users during the spring session.

The upgrades, which began in February 2017, include new flooring, additional study spaces, improved lighting, upgraded furniture and additional electrical outlets (with USB chargers).

 

The upgrades have been popular with students. “I like this new seating by the windows,” says Heather, undergraduate student in the Faculty of Education who studies regularly at IKBLC, “It’s nice to have more natural light.”

Fourth-year Psychology student Nithia enjoys the new, more user-friendly study spaces, “The higher tables and chairs are much more comfortable — I slouch less. And the new usb ports are very convenient.”

The renovation is one of several projects planned for 2017 to improve UBC Library spaces and services for UBC students.  

“Every effort was made during the renovation project to minimize disruptions and maintain available study space for students,” says Julie Mitchell, Assistant Director, Student Engagement, IKBLC, “We’re so pleased with how the renovations turned out and to see students already enjoying the upgraded spaces.”

Be sure to try out the upgraded study spaces for yourself! 

 

At the end of May, UBC Library held its first annual croquet tournament for staff! As part of the contest, there was also a contest to recreate historical croquet images from the Tremaine Arkley Croquet Collection (inspired by these amazing photographs staged by our friends in Digital Initiatives a couple of years ago). As the custodian of the collection, RBSC was asked to put together a panel of “celebrity” faculty judges for the contest. We were delighted to have the artistic and period expertise of Dr. Kathie Shoemaker (Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program), Dr. Sarika Bose (Department of English), and Dr. Laurie McNeill (Coordinated Arts Program) on the panel. Last week the winning photograph was announced, and the winners are: The Croquet All-Stars, a team made up of Sheldon Armstrong, Allan Bell, and Lea Starr, three of our assistant university librarians. You can see the original photo, as well as the recreation photo below. Congratulations to Sheldon, Allan, and Lea! Thanks for bringing our collections to life!

The Croquet All-Stars (left to right): Allan Bell, Sheldon Armstrong, and Lea Starr

One of more than 1400 digital images available in the Tremaine Arkley Croquet Collection

 

 

 

 

It’s the 20th birthday of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, the book that started both a literary phenomenon and pop culture tidal wave. In 2015, UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections began acquiring complete sets of first editions of the Harry Potter series. Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC) houses significant collections of rare […]

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