LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF801.A7 A44 2017
ALI, the American Law Institute, Restatement of the Law, Consumer Contracts, Discussion Draft (April 17, 2017) (Philadelphia: The Executive Office, The American Law Institute, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF1215 .R47 2017
ALI, The American Law Institute, Restatement of the Law, Liability Insurance, Proposed Final Draft (March 28, 2017) (Philadelphia: The Executive Office, The American Law Institute, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF9685 .M62 2017
ALI, The American Law Institute, Model Penal Code, Sentencing, Proposed Final Draft, (April 10, 2017) (Philadelphia: The Executive Office, The American Law Institute, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KPA2020 .H69 2016
Supreme Court Library of Korea, How Court Organization Law Led to the Modern Judicial System of Korea: Laws and Trials in the Late Joseon Period (Seoul: Supreme Court Library of Korea, 2016).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KPA2020 .R855 2016
Supreme Court Library of Korea, Rule of Law Opens a New Era: Laws and Trials of the Joseon Dynasty (Seoul: Supreme Court Library of Korea, 2016).

Photo courtesy: Pixabay

 

It is a pleasure to announce the arrival of a new item recently added to cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository resulting from the collaborative efforts between a world-renowned scholar and several of UBC’s academic research units and community partners – School of Music, Hong Kong Studies Initiative, Centre for Chinese Research, Museum of Anthropology, and St. John’s College.

 

Nancy Yunhwa Rao is an Associate Director of Academic Studies who is both the Head of the Composition Program and the Head of the Music Theory Program of the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. As “one of the leading scholars in Chinese American music studies”, she has amassed award-winning research which focuses on the “musical history of Chinese in the United States, Canada, and Cuba” which she “mined [from] immigration files” and so forth.

 

Examples of her published research are found in a variety of journal publications such as the “Cambridge Opera Journal, Journal of the Society for American Music, Journal of 19th Century Music Review, as well as several collections of essays”. Interestingly, she has published ‘a book on Chinatown Opera Theater in North America via the University Illinois Press’ which is completely filled with the “analysis of playbills, performing networks, opera arias, stage spectacles, and more”.

 

Watch Parts One and Two of her talk here

 

Explore the Chinese Special Collections‘ Library Research Guide

 

 

 

Criterion-on-Demand will be down for scheduled maintenance and upgrades from 10:00 pm PDT Friday, July 28th to 7:00 am PDT Monday, July 31st.

It's no secret that business owners need many different skills to succeed: they're responsible for everything from making strategic decisions to making sure the water bill is paid on time. But amid the daily bustle, one important skill is at risk of being overlooked: management.

Why Does Management Matter?

Good management is essential for small business survival, but many entrepreneurs might not have strong management skills. Management skills are often learned on the job and are "understudied and undertaught" compared to leadership skills, largely because it can be difficult to describe what managers do on a day-to-day basis.

In addition to writing job descriptions and recruiting candidates, entrepreneurs need do a variety of managerial tasks like figuring out how to give productive feedback to your employees and creating a healthy workplace environment. Because of this, entrepreneurs who successfully launch their product or service can struggle when their employee count begins to grow.

Support for Managers

For those interested in brushing up on their managerial skills, we have good news – you’re not alone! There are a variety of resources designed to support BC entrepreneurs who want to bolster their managerial skills, covering everything from the basics to high-level concepts.

On the Web

Canada Business Network, a government information service for businesses and start-up entrepreneurs across Canada, and WorkBC, the provincial government organization that helps employers and employees navigate BC’s labour market, both offer a wealth of relevant online resources for entrepreneurs-turned-managers.

Canada Business Network highlights include a list of questions to ask yourself to see if you are ready to take on employees and a comprehensive handbook that covers your obligations and opportunities when it comes to hiring employees, as well as tools for streamlining human resources administration. Work BC has outstanding information on how to ensure workplace health and safety and how to strengthen your business by hiring from a diverse population.

Classes

Many institutions across BC offer classes, certificate programs, and diplomas in small business management. On EducationPlannerBC, you can search for programs by subject area, program length, and geographic location.
If you don’t have the time or resources to attend to in-person classes, Lynda.com, a subscription-based online learning platform that is accessible through many public libraries, offers a series of courses that cover how to manage people and projects effectively. 

Books

Management is a growing field of study, and as a result there are many great books about management out there. We recommend checking out First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently from Gallup Press and Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Master the Flow of Talent by Sydney Finkelstein - two of our recent #sbalibrary Summer Reading Challenge picks. And of course, your local public or academic library can give you tailored recommendations to meet your specific needs.

 

PHOTO CREDIT: wocintechchat.com

It's no secret that business owners need many different skills to succeed: they're responsible for everything from making strategic decisions to making sure the water bill is paid on time. But amid the daily bustle, one important skill is at risk of being overlooked: management.

Why Does Management Matter?

Good management is essential for small business survival, but many entrepreneurs might not have strong management skills. Management skills are often learned on the job and are "understudied and undertaught" compared to leadership skills, largely because it can be difficult to describe what managers do on a day-to-day basis.

In addition to writing job descriptions and recruiting candidates, entrepreneurs need do a variety of managerial tasks like figuring out how to give productive feedback to your employees and creating a healthy workplace environment. Because of this, entrepreneurs who successfully launch their product or service can struggle when their employee count begins to grow.

Support for Managers

For those interested in brushing up on their managerial skills, we have good news – you’re not alone! There are a variety of resources designed to support BC entrepreneurs who want to bolster their managerial skills, covering everything from the basics to high-level concepts.

On the Web

Canada Business Network, a government information service for businesses and start-up entrepreneurs across Canada, and WorkBC, the provincial government organization that helps employers and employees navigate BC’s labour market, both offer a wealth of relevant online resources for entrepreneurs-turned-managers.

Canada Business Network highlights include a list of questions to ask yourself to see if you are ready to take on employees and a comprehensive handbook that covers your obligations and opportunities when it comes to hiring employees, as well as tools for streamlining human resources administration. Work BC has outstanding information on how to ensure workplace health and safety and how to strengthen your business by hiring from a diverse population.

Classes

Many institutions across BC offer classes, certificate programs, and diplomas in small business management. On EducationPlannerBC, you can search for programs by subject area, program length, and geographic location.
If you don’t have the time or resources to attend to in-person classes, Lynda.com, a subscription-based online learning platform that is accessible through many public libraries, offers a series of courses that cover how to manage people and projects effectively. 

Books

Management is a growing field of study, and as a result there are many great books about management out there. We recommend checking out First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently from Gallup Press and Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Master the Flow of Talent by Sydney Finkelstein - two of our recent #sbalibrary Summer Reading Challenge picks. And of course, your local public or academic library can give you tailored recommendations to meet your specific needs.

 

PHOTO CREDIT: wocintechchat.com

Image: cIRcle Graduate Non-Thesis Research Submission Workflow Overview

 

The GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a lottery based award held twice a year for graduate students at UBC Vancouver which went live on July 9, 2012.

Graduate students were eligible to submit exemplary non-thesis manuscripts or projects related to graduate coursework to the GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award, with approval from their course instructors.

A random selection was made from items submitted to cIRcle during the previous 6 month period – four awards will be made per annum, two in April and two in October.

The GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a five-year (2012-2017) collaboration of the Graduate Student Society and cIRcle/UBC Library.

The first two awards were presented on October 18, 2012 and the last few awards were presented before the Award ended on May 1, 2017.

Congratulations to the 2016 & 2017 Award winners – Victor Ngo and Ali Hosseini* (April 2016); Jean-Paul Andre Joseph Benoit and Amy Myring (October 2016); and, Keilee Mok and Alejandra Echeverri** (April 2017)!

* Note: Co-authors are faculty members and were not eligible for the award.
** Note: Co authors had graduated prior to the award period and were, therefore, ineligible.

 

Over the course of its five-year term, the Award was presented to the randomly-selected UBC graduate students for their exemplary non-thesis research work in either traditional and/or interdisciplinary fields of study:

  • Civil Engineering
  • Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies (CENES)
  • Community and Regional Planning (SCARP)
  • Computer Science
  • Educational Studies
  • Forest Resources Management
  • Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS)
  • Medicine
  • Nursing
  • Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Theatre and Film

“I am grateful for the efforts of those responsible for cIRcle

because I see it as a positive alternative that facilitates sharing of research and work.

cIRcle catalyzes the sharing and building of ideas, motivating students to

improve their work and to give back to the research community that provides so much for them.”

 

    – Robert DeAbreu, GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award Winner, April 2013

 

While the Award officially ended on 1 May 2017, the Award collection was aptly renamed and became the new UBC Graduate Research collection in cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository which now incorporates exemplary non-thesis research work from UBC Okanagan graduate students too. Hooray!

 

The UBC Graduate Research collection welcomes exemplary graduate student non-thesis research such as the following:

  • Essays or papers
  • Graduating papers or projects (Capstone, etc.)
  • Manuscripts
  • Presentations (including research posters)
  • Publisher-permitted versions of journal articles, conference papers, etc. based on course-related research
  • Software code
  • Technical reports
  • Video and audio based projects

 

With too many benefits to list, below are just a sampling of such when making your UBC graduate student non-thesis research openly accessible via cIRcle:

  • Create/enhance your academic and professional scholarly profile
  • Track views and downloads from cities and countries around the world
  • Openly disseminate your UBC research with scholars locally and globally
  • Your work is regularly indexed by web search engines (Google, Google Scholar, etc.)
  • Preserve your UBC scholarly legacy with a DOI (persistent link)

 

UBC graduate students are encouraged to upload their own work (subject to course instructor or supervisor approval) to the UBC Graduate Research collection anytime.

 

 

 

 

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE444 .F35 2017
John Fairlie & Philip Sworden, A Brief Introduction to Law in Canada (Toronto: Emond Publishing, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE482.S84 G53 2017
Nancy McCormack, How to Understand Statutes and Regulations, 2d ed. (Toronto: Thomson Reuters Canada, a division of Thomson Reuters Canada Limited, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE5015 .B53 2017
Sara Blake, Administrative Law in Canada, 6th ed. (Markham: LexisNexis Canada, 2017).

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet