Image: cIRcle Graduate Non-Thesis Research Submission Workflow Overview

 

The GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a lottery based award held twice a year for graduate students at UBC Vancouver which went live on July 9, 2012.

Graduate students were eligible to submit exemplary non-thesis manuscripts or projects related to graduate coursework to the GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award, with approval from their course instructors.

A random selection was made from items submitted to cIRcle during the previous 6 month period – four awards will be made per annum, two in April and two in October.

The GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a five-year (2012-2017) collaboration of the Graduate Student Society and cIRcle/UBC Library.

The first two awards were presented on October 18, 2012 and the last few awards were presented before the Award ended on May 1, 2017.

Congratulations to the 2016 & 2017 Award winners – Victor Ngo and Ali Hosseini* (April 2016); Jean-Paul Andre Joseph Benoit and Amy Myring (October 2016); and, Keilee Mok and Alejandra Echeverri** (April 2017)!

* Note: Co-authors are faculty members and were not eligible for the award.
** Note: Co authors had graduated prior to the award period and were, therefore, ineligible.

 

Over the course of its five-year term, the Award was presented to the randomly-selected UBC graduate students for their exemplary non-thesis research work in either traditional and/or interdisciplinary fields of study:

  • Civil Engineering
  • Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies (CENES)
  • Community and Regional Planning (SCARP)
  • Computer Science
  • Educational Studies
  • Forest Resources Management
  • Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS)
  • Medicine
  • Nursing
  • Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Theatre and Film

“I am grateful for the efforts of those responsible for cIRcle

because I see it as a positive alternative that facilitates sharing of research and work.

cIRcle catalyzes the sharing and building of ideas, motivating students to

improve their work and to give back to the research community that provides so much for them.”

 

    – Robert DeAbreu, GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award Winner, April 2013

 

While the Award officially ended on 1 May 2017, the Award collection was aptly renamed and became the new UBC Graduate Research collection in cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository which now incorporates exemplary non-thesis research work from UBC Okanagan graduate students too. Hooray!

 

The UBC Graduate Research collection welcomes exemplary graduate student non-thesis research such as the following:

  • Essays or papers
  • Graduating papers or projects (Capstone, etc.)
  • Manuscripts
  • Presentations (including research posters)
  • Publisher-permitted versions of journal articles, conference papers, etc. based on course-related research
  • Software code
  • Technical reports
  • Video and audio based projects

 

With too many benefits to list, below are just a sampling of such when making your UBC graduate student non-thesis research openly accessible via cIRcle:

  • Create/enhance your academic and professional scholarly profile
  • Track views and downloads from cities and countries around the world
  • Openly disseminate your UBC research with scholars locally and globally
  • Your work is regularly indexed by web search engines (Google, Google Scholar, etc.)
  • Preserve your UBC scholarly legacy with a DOI (persistent link)

 

UBC graduate students are encouraged to upload their own work (subject to course instructor or supervisor approval) to the UBC Graduate Research collection anytime.

 

 

 

 

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE444 .F35 2017
John Fairlie & Philip Sworden, A Brief Introduction to Law in Canada (Toronto: Emond Publishing, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE482.S84 G53 2017
Nancy McCormack, How to Understand Statutes and Regulations, 2d ed. (Toronto: Thomson Reuters Canada, a division of Thomson Reuters Canada Limited, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE5015 .B53 2017
Sara Blake, Administrative Law in Canada, 6th ed. (Markham: LexisNexis Canada, 2017).

Program Assistant, Chapman Learning Commons

Background:

Andrea Robin joined the Learning Centre in July 2017 as Program Assistant for the Chapman Learning Commons. Before joining the Learning Centre team, Andrea worked with universities and non-profits providing programming and facilitation for integrated learning as well as grant writing and development to build access to education for communities throughout the province of BC. With a background in fine art and further studies in neuroscience, Andrea has been contributing at the intersection of culture, learning, and social innovation for over ten years. Andrea is grateful to support young people and learners of all ages to reach their goals by their values.

Current role and responsibilities:

As Learning Commons Program Assistant, Andrea’s fortunate to offer support to students as they build their capacity through integrated learning. Andrea contributes to the development and maintenance of processes supporting the day-to-day operations of the Chapman Learning Commons including managing workshop/event bookings in the Lillooet and Dodson Rooms, creating content and curation for the digital signage screens in the Learning Commons and Music, Art and Architecture Library, website maintenance, promoting learning opportunities by contributing to the CLC social media platforms and providing ongoing information referrals to the UBC and greater communities.

Contact

Phone: 604-827-5949

Email: andrea.robin@ubc.ca

 

There is excitement among researchers both nationally and internationally on the recent U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ statement. Why? It focuses on sustainable publishing.

 

As a collaborative body of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities, the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ works to “foster the development and delivery of long-term, sustainable higher education and research policy, in Canada and around the world”.  These Canadian universities are “home to world-class researchers using state-of-the-art research infrastructure to make ground-breaking discoveries” as they “train tomorrow’s citizens, entrepreneurs and leaders, and work with partners from the public, private and government sectors to mobilize knowledge and capitalize on it”.

 

The message by Suzanne Corbeil, U15 Executive Director, states in part that “[w]e know investing in research and science pays dividends for all Canadians. It spurs innovation and fosters the curiosity and creativity that our best and brightest minds direct towards solving society’s greatest challenges. It also enables us to ensure we are developing the best and brightest talent for the workforce of tomorrow, and are able to conduct research in world-class facilities that can drive growth of innovative companies.“

 

In its preamble, the U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing emphasizes that, “Access to research and scholarly outputs is essential for scientific discovery, innovation, and education. To maximize knowledge transfer and impact, our researchers’ work must be made readily available around the globe. Research-intensive universities also require timely and continuing access to international research results and scholarship in order to advance and disseminate knowledge, and to develop the next generation of researchers.”

 

The five key principles and their highlights found in the U15 statement are briefly listed directly below:

 

  1. Open Access – a necessity for an accessible and sustainable model of scholarly publishing
  2. Public Interest – disseminating scholarly publications and other research outputs as widely as possible
  3. Quality – rigorous peer review processes and effective research impact measures in all forms of academic publishing
  4. Accountability – highest possible proportion of public dollars invested in research and education
  5. Innovation – collaborative development of new models of scholarly communications benefit the academy and the public in the digital age

 

Download the full U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing here

 

Explore Open Access and more at UBC

 

Browse UBC’s digital repository for research and teaching materials

 

 

Above logo is courtesy of U15

 

Learning Services Librarian

Background

Alex Kuskowski joined the Learning Center in October 2016. A UBC Alumni, Alex gradated with a Master’s in Library Science from the UBC School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS). Prior to working in the Learning Commons, Alex was a writer and editor for a children’s book publishing company. Alex has an extensive background in writing, education, and digital media.

Current Role and Responsibilities

In her current role, Alex manages the planning, implementation and assessment of learning support programs and services at the Chapman Learning Commons. This includes overseeing the equipment lending program and student-staff at the Chapman Learning Commons desk. Alex also co-leads several UBC collaborative information literacy projects including the Digital Tattoo project and the Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi). Alex is interested in using digital media and emerging technology to engage students, staff and the community with library services.

Contact

Email: alex.kuskowski@ubc.ca
Phone: 604-822-6915

UPDATE ; Wiley Online is back online.

Wiley Online Library (eBooks & eJournals) seems to be down.

Working on it.

Stay tuned.

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