Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC Reads Sustainability and the R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Program.

In this moderated conversation, Duncan McCue will share his experience writing The Shoe Boy, a story of him discovering his indigenous identity as a teenager and his perspective on how connection to land and cultural identity are related to the world’s sustainability. Duncan McCue is the host of CBC Radio One Cross Country Checkup. McCue was a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. Now based in Toronto, his news and current affairs pieces continue to be featured on CBC’s flagship news show, The National.

McCue’s work has garnered several RTNDA and Jack Webster Awards. He was part of a CBC Aboriginal investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women that won numerous honours including the Hillman Award for Investigative Journalism. McCue has spent years teaching journalism at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism and was recognized by the Canadian Ethnic Media Association with an Innovation Award for developing curriculum on Indigenous issues. He’s also an author: his book The Shoe Boy: A Trapline Memoir recounts a season he spent in a hunting camp with a Cree family in northern Quebec as a teenager. He was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, where he created an online guide for journalists called Reporting in Indigenous Communities (riic.ca). Before becoming a journalist, McCue studied English at the University of King’s College, then Law at UBC. He was called to the bar in British Columbia in 1998. McCue is Anishinaabe, a member of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation in southern Ontario, and proud father of two children.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

The intrepid native reporter: Duncan McCue. Jones, M., Bear, J. and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2008).[Video/DVD] Vancouver: Moving Images Distribution.McCue, D., & Xwi7xwa Collection. [Link]

The shoe boy: A trapline memoir. New Westminster, British Columbia: Nonvella Publishing Inc. (2016). [Link]

Restorative justice: Capacity for forgiveness. McCue, D., Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2010).[Video/DVD] Toronto: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC with Equity and Inclusion.

#MeToo. #IWill. Awareness is important, but how do we move beyond hashtags and words to making substantive change to the workplace experience for women? It seems every day new accusations of harassment come to the fore – from Hollywood to Wall Street to Commercial Drive. In response, thousands of women have posted “#metoo” on social media, indicating that they too have been sexually assaulted or harassed. Men have since responded with #IWill, signaling their individual commitment to take action in order to prevent such events happening in their midst. The #metoo campaign demonstrates just how pervasive the everyday sexual harassment of women is. But what next? How can we change what seems to be an accepted way of treating women? How can we improve the workplace and what concrete role can each and every one us play in helping to do so? How do we go beyond awareness to actual – and more permanent – change? Join us for a panel discussion as we examine this timely and pervasive issue and explore options for moving forward.

This event is open to all members of the public and seeks to foster thoughtful dialogue on this important issue. We hope that participants walk away with broadened perspectives and inspired with ideas to help make change happen in their communities. Speakers:  Prof. Jennifer Berdahl, Sauder School of Business, The University of British Columbia (TBC) Fiona MacFarlane, Managing Partner and Chief Inclusiveness Officer, Ernst & Young, LLP (TBC) Chantelle Krish, Associate Director, Communications and Advocacy, YWCA (TBC) Moderator Sara-Jane Finlay, PhD, Associate Vice-President, Equity & Inclusion Office, The University of British Columbia


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). Harassment based on sex: Protecting social status in the context of gender hierarchy. The Academy of Management Review, 32(2), 641-658.  [Link]

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). The sexual harassment of uppity women. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(2), 425-437. [Link]

O’Reilly, J., Robinson, S., Berdahl, J., & Banki, S. (2015). Is negative attention better than no attention? the comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work. Organization Science, 26(3), 774-793.  [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC with Equity and Inclusion.

#MeToo. #IWill. Awareness is important, but how do we move beyond hashtags and words to making substantive change to the workplace experience for women? It seems every day new accusations of harassment come to the fore – from Hollywood to Wall Street to Commercial Drive. In response, thousands of women have posted “#metoo” on social media, indicating that they too have been sexually assaulted or harassed. Men have since responded with #IWill, signaling their individual commitment to take action in order to prevent such events happening in their midst. The #metoo campaign demonstrates just how pervasive the everyday sexual harassment of women is. But what next? How can we change what seems to be an accepted way of treating women? How can we improve the workplace and what concrete role can each and every one us play in helping to do so? How do we go beyond awareness to actual – and more permanent – change? Join us for a panel discussion as we examine this timely and pervasive issue and explore options for moving forward.

This event is open to all members of the public and seeks to foster thoughtful dialogue on this important issue. We hope that participants walk away with broadened perspectives and inspired with ideas to help make change happen in their communities. Speakers:  Prof. Jennifer Berdahl, Sauder School of Business, The University of British Columbia (TBC) Fiona MacFarlane, Managing Partner and Chief Inclusiveness Officer, Ernst & Young, LLP (TBC) Chantelle Krish, Associate Director, Communications and Advocacy, YWCA (TBC) Moderator Sara-Jane Finlay, PhD, Associate Vice-President, Equity & Inclusion Office, The University of British Columbia


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). Harassment based on sex: Protecting social status in the context of gender hierarchy. The Academy of Management Review, 32(2), 641-658.  [Link]

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). The sexual harassment of uppity women. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(2), 425-437. [Link]

O’Reilly, J., Robinson, S., Berdahl, J., & Banki, S. (2015). Is negative attention better than no attention? the comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work. Organization Science, 26(3), 774-793.  [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC Himalaya Program .

This conversation will give both authors the space to discuss their recently published novels, short stories, and non-fiction, and exchange their perspectives on what it means to represent Nepal and Tibet in the English-language literary scene in Canada and abroad.
Speaker Biographies:

Tsering Wangmo Dhompa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manjushree_Thapa) is the author of three collections of poetry: My rice tastes like the lake, In the Absent Everyday and Rules of the House (all from Apogee Press, Berkeley). My rice tastes like the lake was a finalist for the Northern California Independent Bookseller’s Book of the Year Award for 2012. Dhompa’s first non-fiction book, Coming Home to Tibet was published by Shambhala Publications in 2016. She teaches creative writing and is a PhD candidate in Literature at the University of California in Santa Cruz.

Manjushree Thapa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsering_Wangmo_Dhompa) is the author of three novels, a short story collection and three nonfiction books about her homeland, Nepal. She is also a literary translator, and her translation of Darjeeling author Indra Bahadur Rai’s novel There’s a Carnival Today was released in South Asia in October 2017. The Canadian edition of her latest novel, All of Us in Our Own Lives, will be out in 2018. She lives in Toronto.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Dhompa, T. W. (2005). In the absent everyday. Berkeley, Calif: Apogee Press. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2005). Forget kathmandu: An elegy for democracy. New York, New York;New Delhi;: Penguin, Viking. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2004). friends. Manoa, 16(2), 169-183. [Link]

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