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LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD502 .I56 2017
John Baker, ed., The Inns of Chancery 1340-1640: With an Edition of the Surviving Statutes and Orders (London: Selden Society, 2017).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2):
John Sopinka, Mark A. Gelowitz & W. David Rankin, Sopinka and Gelowitz on the Conduct of an Appeal, 4th ed. (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada Inc., 2018).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KEB549 .F74 2018
G. Peter Fraser, John W. Horn & Susan A. Griffin, The Conduct of Civil Litigation in British Columbia, Student Edition (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada Inc., 2018).

The Law Library is offering the following training sessions for current Allard School of Law students and faculty.

Lexis Advance Quicklaw

  • Monday, September 17, 2018 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
  • Wednesday, September 26, 2018 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

WestlawNext Canada

  • Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
  • Monday, September 24, 2018 at 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

To register, please see Law – Commercial Databases Training Sessions

Event planners organize, execute, and promote events like trade shows, conferences, corporate meetings, and more. Event planning is a business with a low barrier to entry, so competition within the industry is high (Couillard, 2018). Factors that have a strong impact on the success of event planning businesses are personal relationships with customers, the ability to manage costs and contracts, and whether the event planner has the ability to manage the seasonal fluctuations of the industry (Couillard, 2018). This post will give you an up-to-date look at trends, challenges, and research resources, for those interested in becoming event planners or event planners who would like to gain a competitive edge.

Canada

As of 2017, there were 1,313 businesses in Canada categorized as Convention and Trade Show Organizers, the larger umbrella term which encompasses organizers, managers, and promoters of all type of events and meetings, with the notable exceptions of wedding planning services and live events such as concerts. For more information about wedding planning, please see our industry overview here or our industry guide to wedding planning here.

Table of business sizes in Canadian provinces and territories in the event planning industry. Please click the links below if you cannot see this image.

Statistics Canada. Table 33-10-0037-01 Canadian Business Counts, with employees, December 2017.

Statistics Canada. Table 33-10-0038-01 Canadian Business Counts, without employees, December 2017.

In 2016, this industry made a total of $620.3 thousand, with 80.8% of businesses reporting a profit. There was a net profit for the industry of $109.1 thousand (Statistics Canada, 2016).

British Columbia

As is visible in the table above, British Columbia has the third highest number of event planning businesses in Canada, with a total of 180 businesses. Of those 180 businesses, 41.1% have employees.

This number has increased by 1.1% since 2016, when there were 178 businesses. In 2016, 39.9% of those businesses had employees. 51.4% of businesses with employees were considered micro businesses, with between one and four employees (Statistics Canada, 2016). 42.8% were small businesses, with between five and ninety-nine employees (Statistics Canada, 2016). The largest event planning businesses in British Columbia fell into the medium business category, with between one hundred and four hundred ninety-nine employees; these accounted for just 5.7% of event planning businesses with employees in British Columbia, or 2.2% of the total number of event planning businesses (Statistics Canada, 2016).

Cost Breakdown of Event Planning Businesses in Canada

The chart below show a breakdown of how trade show and event planning in Canada spend their revenue in comparison to other industries in their sector (Couillard, 2018). The broad sector for this industry is administrative and support services, which includes things such as office administrative services, business support services, and travel arrangement and reservation services (Statistics Canada, 2017).

Chart depicting how industry revenue is distributed between things such as wages, profits, renting utilities etc. Please see the IBIS report if you cannot see this picture

Industry Trends

This industry has low revenue volatility, despite the high competition levels (Couillard, 2018). Profit margins are expected to rise slightly in the industry over the next five years, in both Canada and the US (Couillard, 2018; Convention & Trade Show Organizers Industry (NAICS 56192), 2018).

Canadian Event Planning Industry Revenue Projection

revenue projections for Canadian event planning industry

American Event Planning Industry Revenue Projection

revenue projections for US event planning industry

There is a strong trend towards the increased use of technology in this industry, with business operators needing to learn to use and develop mobile platforms, social media, and webinars to enhance client experience (Couillard, 2018).

As globalization continues, the event planning industry in Canada will likely reap some of the benefits, as Canada has become a more appealing locale to have multinational events due to the availability of large spaces and business expansion into Canada from foreign companies (Couillard, 2018).

Notable Industry Information

  • Social media such as Facebook and LinkedIn are improving the ability of potential clients to network without ever meeting face to face, which has traditionally been a major reason to attend trade shows and conferences; those in the industry will have to ensure that their current clients continue to understand the value of face – to – face interactions (Couillard, 2018).
  • Outside factors such as per capita disposable income and corporate profit a strong drivers for this industry, so any downwards trends in those areas are likely to affect the revenue of event planning businesses (Couillard, 2018).
  • Corporate events are one of the major sectors of the event planning industry. Since corporate profit is affected by global oil and commodity prices the stability of commodity prices may pose an indirect challenge to the industry, because companies with slimmer profits are less likely to hire event planners to host and plan events (Couillard, 2018).
  • There is an increased focus on offering engaging and entertaining events, offering fun experiences for participants such as virtual reality (etouches, 2017).
  • As part of the trend towards trying to increase participant engagement, events will likely become smaller and more intimate (etouches, 2017).
  • There is also a rise in niche industry events, which is leading to smaller events such as pop-ups (etouches, 2017).

The most important success factors for those in the event planning industry are identified by Couillard’s IBISWorld Industry Report (2018) as:

  • Maintenance of excellent customer relations
  • Management of seasonal production
  • Effective cost controls
  • Ability to manage external (outsourcing) contracts

Additional Resources

Below are some resources to help you get started on your business research.

Associations

Magazines and Trade Journals

Directories

If you would like to access more resources, the Event Planning Guide is designed to help prospective and existing event planning business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out The Beginner's Guide to Business Research; it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why they are important.

References

Convention & Trade Show Organizers Industry (NAICS 56192). (2018). United States Convention & Trade Show Organizers Industry Report, 1-196.

Couillard, L. (2018). Trade show & event planning in Canada (IBISWorld Industry Report 56192CA). IBISWorld Inc. Retrieved from http://clients1.ibisworld.com/reports/ca/industry/default.aspx?entid=1502

etouches. (2017). The best 2017 event trends you need to know. Canadian Special Events Magazine. Retrieved from http://canadianspecialevents.com/17192/the-best-2017-event-trends-you-need-to-know/

Statistics Canada. (2017). Table 33-10-0037-01 Canadian Business Counts, with employees. Retrieved from https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310003701

Statistics Canada. (2017. Table 33-10-0038-01 Canadian Business Counts, without employees. Retrieved from https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310003801

Statistics Canada. (2017). North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada 2017 Version 2.0. Retrieved from http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p3VD.pl?Function=getVD&TVD=380372&CVD=380374&CPV=561&CST=01012017&CLV=2&MLV=5

Statistics Canada. (2016). Financial performance – Canadian industry statistics. Convention and Trade Show Organizers – 56192. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/performance/rev/56192

Statistics Canada. (2016). Businesses – Canadian industry statistics. Convention and Trade Show Organizers – 56192. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/56192

Industry Trends

Event planners organize, execute, and promote events like trade shows, conferences, corporate meetings, and more. Event planning is a business with a low barrier to entry, so competition within the industry is high (Couillard, 2018). Factors that have a strong impact on the success of event planning businesses are personal relationships with customers, the ability to manage costs and contracts, and whether the event planner has the ability to manage the seasonal fluctuations of the industry (Couillard, 2018). This post will give you an up-to-date look at trends, challenges, and research resources, for those interested in becoming event planners or event planners who would like to gain a competitive edge.

Canada

As of 2017, there were 1,313 businesses in Canada categorized as Convention and Trade Show Organizers, the larger umbrella term which encompasses organizers, managers, and promoters of all type of events and meetings, with the notable exceptions of wedding planning services and live events such as concerts. For more information about wedding planning, please see our industry overview here or our industry guide to wedding planning here.

Table of business sizes in Canadian provinces and territories in the event planning industry. Please click the links below if you cannot see this image.

Statistics Canada. Table 33-10-0037-01 Canadian Business Counts, with employees, December 2017.

Statistics Canada. Table 33-10-0038-01 Canadian Business Counts, without employees, December 2017.

In 2016, this industry made a total of $620.3 thousand, with 80.8% of businesses reporting a profit. There was a net profit for the industry of $109.1 thousand (Statistics Canada, 2016).

British Columbia

As is visible in the table above, British Columbia has the third highest number of event planning businesses in Canada, with a total of 180 businesses. Of those 180 businesses, 41.1% have employees.

This number has increased by 1.1% since 2016, when there were 178 businesses. In 2016, 39.9% of those businesses had employees. 51.4% of businesses with employees were considered micro businesses, with between one and four employees (Statistics Canada, 2016). 42.8% were small businesses, with between five and ninety-nine employees (Statistics Canada, 2016). The largest event planning businesses in British Columbia fell into the medium business category, with between one hundred and four hundred ninety-nine employees; these accounted for just 5.7% of event planning businesses with employees in British Columbia, or 2.2% of the total number of event planning businesses (Statistics Canada, 2016).

Cost Breakdown of Event Planning Businesses in Canada

The chart below show a breakdown of how trade show and event planning in Canada spend their revenue in comparison to other industries in their sector (Couillard, 2018). The broad sector for this industry is administrative and support services, which includes things such as office administrative services, business support services, and travel arrangement and reservation services (Statistics Canada, 2017).

Chart depicting how industry revenue is distributed between things such as wages, profits, renting utilities etc. Please see the IBIS report if you cannot see this picture

Industry Trends

This industry has low revenue volatility, despite the high competition levels (Couillard, 2018). Profit margins are expected to rise slightly in the industry over the next five years, in both Canada and the US (Couillard, 2018; Convention & Trade Show Organizers Industry (NAICS 56192), 2018).

Canadian Event Planning Industry Revenue Projection

revenue projections for Canadian event planning industry

American Event Planning Industry Revenue Projection

revenue projections for US event planning industry

There is a strong trend towards the increased use of technology in this industry, with business operators needing to learn to use and develop mobile platforms, social media, and webinars to enhance client experience (Couillard, 2018).

As globalization continues, the event planning industry in Canada will likely reap some of the benefits, as Canada has become a more appealing locale to have multinational events due to the availability of large spaces and business expansion into Canada from foreign companies (Couillard, 2018).

Notable Industry Information

  • Social media such as Facebook and LinkedIn are improving the ability of potential clients to network without ever meeting face to face, which has traditionally been a major reason to attend trade shows and conferences; those in the industry will have to ensure that their current clients continue to understand the value of face – to – face interactions (Couillard, 2018).
  • Outside factors such as per capita disposable income and corporate profit a strong drivers for this industry, so any downwards trends in those areas are likely to affect the revenue of event planning businesses (Couillard, 2018).
  • Corporate events are one of the major sectors of the event planning industry. Since corporate profit is affected by global oil and commodity prices the stability of commodity prices may pose an indirect challenge to the industry, because companies with slimmer profits are less likely to hire event planners to host and plan events (Couillard, 2018).
  • There is an increased focus on offering engaging and entertaining events, offering fun experiences for participants such as virtual reality (etouches, 2017).
  • As part of the trend towards trying to increase participant engagement, events will likely become smaller and more intimate (etouches, 2017).
  • There is also a rise in niche industry events, which is leading to smaller events such as pop-ups (etouches, 2017).

The most important success factors for those in the event planning industry are identified by Couillard’s IBISWorld Industry Report (2018) as:

  • Maintenance of excellent customer relations
  • Management of seasonal production
  • Effective cost controls
  • Ability to manage external (outsourcing) contracts

Additional Resources

Below are some resources to help you get started on your business research.

Associations

Magazines and Trade Journals

Directories

If you would like to access more resources, the Event Planning Guide is designed to help prospective and existing event planning business owners gather information for their secondary market research. The guide is broken down into four main sections that cover how to start your research, industry information, competitive information and customer information. Depending on your needs you can spend as much or as little time as necessary in each section.

If you find that you need more guidance before starting your secondary research, check out The Beginner's Guide to Business Research; it will help you focus on what types of information you will need to gather and why they are important.

References

Convention & Trade Show Organizers Industry (NAICS 56192). (2018). United States Convention & Trade Show Organizers Industry Report, 1-196.

Couillard, L. (2018). Trade show & event planning in Canada (IBISWorld Industry Report 56192CA). IBISWorld Inc. Retrieved from http://clients1.ibisworld.com/reports/ca/industry/default.aspx?entid=1502

etouches. (2017). The best 2017 event trends you need to know. Canadian Special Events Magazine. Retrieved from http://canadianspecialevents.com/17192/the-best-2017-event-trends-you-need-to-know/

Statistics Canada. (2017). Table 33-10-0037-01 Canadian Business Counts, with employees. Retrieved from https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310003701

Statistics Canada. (2017. Table 33-10-0038-01 Canadian Business Counts, without employees. Retrieved from https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310003801

Statistics Canada. (2017). North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada 2017 Version 2.0. Retrieved from http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p3VD.pl?Function=getVD&TVD=380372&CVD=380374&CPV=561&CST=01012017&CLV=2&MLV=5

Statistics Canada. (2016). Financial performance – Canadian industry statistics. Convention and Trade Show Organizers – 56192. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/performance/rev/56192

Statistics Canada. (2016). Businesses – Canadian industry statistics. Convention and Trade Show Organizers – 56192. Retrieved from https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/56192

Industry Trends

Reference Librarian

Woodward Library, UBC Library | Vancouver Campus

Full-Time, Term Ending April 18, 2020

Anticipated Start Date: November 1, 2018

UBC LIBRARY

The University of British Columbia Library is one of the largest academic libraries in Canada and consistently ranks among the top university research libraries in North America. UBC Library has 14 branches and divisions, two campuses (Vancouver and Kelowna), one off-site hospital library, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre – a multi-purpose teaching and learning facility.

The Library’s collection of over 7M items includes 1.4M ebooks, 229,020 electronic journals, 850,000 maps, audio, DVD/video and graphic materials, and 1,703 bibliographic and fulltext databases.

More than 300 knowledgeable employees – librarians, management and professional staff, support staff and student staff – provide users with the excellent resources and services that they need to further their research, teaching and learning.  The UBC Library Strategic Plan 2015-2017 can be viewed at http://about.library.ubc.ca/strategic-plan/  To learn more about working with UBC Library and to explore our aspirational values visit UBC Library – Why work with us. 

WOODWARD LIBRARY

Woodward Library collaborates in research, teaching and learning with seven faculties: Applied Science, Dentistry, Forestry, Land & Food Systems, Medicine, Pharmaceutical Sciences and Science. We build relevant collections and provide expertise to empower our community to succeed.

POSITION SUMMARY

The Woodward Science Librarian provides liaison to designated subject areas and departments. Actively engages in integrated information literacy, and collaborates on scholarly communication and data services initiatives and other new library initiatives as they arise. Develops re-usable learning objects, designs, develops and maintains a library of digital materials to support information literacy instruction in print and online environments. Conducts assessment of resources, and provides input on collections management.

Participates as a member of the Woodward Library team to provide liaison, reference, instructional programs and information services to faculty, students and community users. Assumes responsibility for designated subject areas and liaison with assigned departments.  Provides web-based and classroom instruction and assistance in the use of information resources. As a member of the Woodward Library team, plans and implements services that respond to the needs of the sciences communities.  Participates in the development and assessment of library collections for designated subject areas. Participates in the development of library policy, procedures, and services.  Assumes responsibility for coordination and management of staff, services or projects as required. Evening and weekend work may be required. The nature and scope of responsibilities for this and other library positions are expected to change as the Library organization evolves.

QUALIFICATIONS: 

Required:

  • Graduate degree from an accredited programme in Library Science
  • Knowledge of electronic information technologies and their applications to reference, as well as knowledge of best practices in online learning pedagogies
  • Demonstrated ability to initiate, plan and carry out projects, both independently and as a member of a team
  • Evidence of a proactive, user-centred vision of services
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Strong interpersonal and communication skills and the ability to work effectively as a member of a team
  • Ability to adjust and accommodate changing demands within Libraries and academic institutions
  • Dedicated to cultivating an inclusive environment that recognizes barriers faced by people and encourages and incorporates contributions from diverse groups and individuals.
  • Contributes to the Library’s sense of community and achievement of common goals through cooperation across units/groups and encouragement of equitable and balanced involvement in decision making.
  • Promotes and fosters a supportive environment built on appreciation, recognition, learning and professional growth.
  • Works to build a team environment built on positive working relationships, provides guidance and resources to teams while trusting them to excel.
  • Creates a supportive and open environment where everyone is able to listen, contribute and engage with colleagues and ideas and provide and receive timely, constructive feedback.
  • Creates an environment that embraces curiosity, ideas, creativity and innovation and provides opportunities and flexibility to explore new initiatives.

Preferred:

  • Academic background in health sciences or engineering as well as relevant work experience
  • Familiarity with current trends in instruction, knowledge synthesis methodologies and expert searching in the health sciences, data curation, open access, and bibliographic management tools

WORKING RELATIONSHIPS:

Reports to the Head, Woodward Library or her designate Head in the branch and consults with colleagues and Library staff as required. Works with all other UBC Library Divisions as required, assessing and trouble-shooting information technologies, scheduling and marketing information literacy sessions, etc. May be required to supervise student librarians, student assistants and library assistants for assigned projects or for group-related functions.

DUTIES:

Reference Services

  • Provides reference and research services to University of British Columbia students, staff and faculty members; and members of the public.
  • As the librarian responsible for particular subjects, advises and assists in difficult or extensive searches in these areas.  Employs the full range of Internet, electronic and print resources.
  • Participates in collection development in liaison areas.
  • Works with others to develop and maintain the Woodward Library presence on the UBC Library webpage and throughout the UBC campus, as appropriate.
  • Provides Information/Reference training for support staff and UBC iSchool student librarians.

TEACHING AND ORIENTATION

  • Organizes and teaches classes in the use of the Library’s resources, including the Library’s catalogue, print resources and e-resources.
  • Undertakes specialized instructional programs; including planning, designing and organizing and including various formats for presentations.
  • Participates in library-use instruction programs.
  • Prepares handouts, research guides and informational brochures in appropriate formats.
  • Provides instruction/presentations to faculty and students (in the library, online and in the faculty departments).

Faculty Liaison

  • Initiates and maintains contact with faculty in assigned departments. 
  • Informs faculty of services and instruction offered.
  • Works with faculty on the development of information and research modules and courses for students.
  • Selects print and electronic materials to support assigned liaison areas.
  • Liaises with faculty on issues of collection development.
  • Responds to faculty requests for accreditation, new course proposals, etc., in consultation with the Head of Woodward Library.
  • Attends faculty meetings and participates in faculty committees.

Supervision and Administration

  • May be required to supervise staff in the absence of the supervisor(s).
  • May be assigned supervisory responsibility for building maintenance, collections management and storage.
  • May be assigned coordination of reference or instruction services within Woodward Library: reference, information desk scheduling, teaching and instruction, web presence, subject guides and/or information guides, etc.

Library Liaison

  • Represents Woodward Library on library committees and working groups.
  • Liaises with librarians in other areas of the library system.
  • Maintains an awareness of new literature and research developments in areas of specialization and emerging trends in sciences libraries.
  • Keeps abreast of public services developments in the rest of the Library. 

TERMS OF APPOINTMENT AND SALARY:

This position will be filled as a full-time, term position ending April 18, 2020.

We are seeking applications from Librarians with up to 2 years of experience.  However, all internal candidates will be considered regardless of years of experience and are encouraged to apply. Salary will be commensurate with experience and academic/professional qualifications.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Applications will include: a detailed and current curriculum vitae; and a letter of application that includes a statement of citizenship/immigration status and indicates the candidate’s education, training and work experience in the areas listed above.  

To view the complete job description and to submit an application, please visit the UBC Careers page at http://www.hr.ubc.ca/careers-postings/faculty.php by midnight on September 21, 2018.

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UBC Library

Info:

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