Image by geralt on Pixabay

 

Writing your thesis for UBC graduation? Confused about thesis formatting?

 

Next Thesis Formatting: Tips, tricks, and resources workshops are as follows:

 

Dates: March 11th & March 25th, 2019

Time: 10am to 12pm (same workshop held on both dates)

Location: Room 217 – Walter C. Koerner Library

 

Register for March 11th  OR March 25th, 2019

 

Curious about a Lay Summary for your thesis or dissertation? Or for a journal article, etc.?

 

 

Next Lay Summaries: Writing workshop is as follows:

 

Date: Wednesday, March 13th, 2019

Time: 10am to 12pm

Location: Sherrington Room – Woodward Library

  

Register for March 13th, 2019

 

 

Wondering how to navigate and manage the publishing process for your research?

 

Next Scholarly Publishing & Author Rights (off-campus) workshop is as follows:

 

Date: Tuesday, March 26th, 2019

Time: 2-4pm

Location: BC Children’s and Women’s Hospitals, Study and Learning Commons Computer Lab, Shaughnessy Building Room F4

 

Register for March 26th, 2019

 

 

Learn more about:

 

cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

Scholarly Communications @ UBC

 

UBC Research Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microforms are reduced-size copies of documents used for access and preservation. There are a few different formats of microforms, the most popular being microfilm (film reels) and microfiche (flat film sheets). This post focuses on how we digitize microfilm.

Microfilm reel

 

At the Digitization Centre, we have digitized newspaper microfilms using our flexScan equipment. Although microfilm is a relatively stable format for preservation purposes, digitization increases access to those materials. Thanks to microfilm digitization, the BC Historical Newspapers collection is fully accessible (and searchable) online, without the need for specialized equipment like a microfilm reader.

flexScan equipment and workstation

 

To digitize a roll of microfilm, it must first be installed on the flexScan machine. The film has to be woven through precisely, as shown here:

Then, the digitizer adjusts several settings on a computer connected to the flexScan. These include the width of the film (16 or 35 mm) and polarity (negative or positive). Most of the microfilms we have digitized are 35 mm negatives.

One tricky setting to get right is the “reduction ratio”. The reduction ration is the ratio of the original newspaper size to the size of the newspaper on the film. So, if the original newspaper was 430 mm high, and the image on the film is 30 mm high, the reduction ratio would be 430 mm / 30 mm ≈ 14.5. This means the original newspaper was shrunk by a factor of 14.5 on the microfilm.

The reduction ratio is important because it helps us approximate the “true DPI” of the image. DPI stands for “dots per inch”.  To calculate out the “true DPI” of the microfilm (how many dots per inch on the film itself), we multiply the approximate DPI of the newspaper (300 DPI) by the reduction ratio. Therefore, in this example, the “true DPI” is 300 DPI x 14.5 = 4350 DPI. This number tells the digitizer how to set the height of the scanner’s sensor.

After configuring these settings and adjusting the sensor height, it’s time to focus! Pressing a button on the computer interface begins slow, incremental movements of the film reel.

In between each advancement of the reel, the digitizer adjusts the camera lens, monitoring the image on the screen until it looks crisp.

Focusing the image

 

After focusing, there are a couple more settings to be adjusted related to lighting and exposure. Then, it’s time to scan!

Once scanning has started, the digitizer can monitor the images produced as they scroll by, pausing to adjust settings as needed:

Monitoring the scanning process

 

After scanning is complete, the digitizer opens a program called the “Auditor”. This program automatically detects the boundaries of each page; however, it requires some manual adjustment on the part of the digitizer. The screen looks like this:

Adjusting the boundaries of each page

 

In the image above, the blue boxes represent confirmed pages, and the yellow and red boxes show issues that need to be manually adjusted. Once everything has been adjusted, the portions inside the boxes can be output into TIFF files.

Interested in our digitization processes and equipment? Check out these previous blog posts on our other scanning equipment, as well as many more behind-the-scenes posts under the How We Digitize tag:

Check out this new resource to help you identify ‘predatory’ or deceptive publishers

 

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KB130 .C38 2018
John Cartwright, Formation and Variation of Contracts, 2d ed. (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2018).

Every three years UBC Library invites a selection of students, faculty, staff, and other members of the UBC community to complete a survey about their needs, expectations, and experiences.  The confidential results help UBC Library improve existing services and plan for the future.

This year, we’re opening up the survey to the entire UBC community! We want to hear about your experiences, regardless of how often you use the library. The survey takes an estimated 10-15 minutes to complete, and we will be giving away one iPad and a few gift cards as part of a draw for those who complete the survey. 

The survey will be open until Friday, March 15, 2019.

Take the survey!


The week of March 4th is Open Education Week, an annual celebration of the global Open Education Movement. This year we invite the UBC community to join us and our colleagues from other higher ed institutions from the Lower Mainland at Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Richmond campus for a one day “Open in Action” event on March 6th from 8:30-3:15.

More information about the schedule and registration are available on BCcampus’s website.

We hope to see you there.

Taj Sohi, our new Branch Operations Supervisor, joined us on February 19th, 2019. Taj will provide leadership in the Education Library’s Borrower and Access Services, Collection Maintenance, and Public Service areas.

Going forward, we welcome you to direct any enquiries and requests regarding print reserves and LOCR to Taj at (604) 822-0996 or education.reserve@ubc.ca.

Our new “Bullies, Bystanders & Bravehearts” Collection Spotlight is up.  Pink Shirt Anti-Bullying Day is February 27, 2019.

See our themed booklist for title suggestions.

UBC Library has acquired access to Statista database for a month starting from February 14, 2019. Statista is a simple to use statistics portal that integrates statistics from thousands of sources, on topics related to business, media, public policy, health and others. Statistics can be exported in PPT, XLS, PDF, and PNG formats. Access includes: -Digital […]

LAW LIBRARY level 3: HD2910 .B4713 2018
Caroline Bérubé, Doing Business in China (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K7128.S7 B53 2018
Katia Bianchini, Protecting Stateless Persons: The Implementation of the Convention Relating to the Status of the Stateless Persons Across EU States (Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE484.E7 M33 2019
Bruce MacDougall, Estoppel, 2d ed. (Toronto: LexisNexis, 2019).

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