Our new “Bullies, Bystanders & Bravehearts” Collection Spotlight is up.  Pink Shirt Anti-Bullying Day is February 27, 2019.

See our themed booklist for title suggestions.

UBC Library has acquired access to Statista database for a month starting from February 14, 2019. Statista is a simple to use statistics portal that integrates statistics from thousands of sources, on topics related to business, media, public policy, health and others. Statistics can be exported in PPT, XLS, PDF, and PNG formats. Access includes: -Digital […]

LAW LIBRARY level 3: HD2910 .B4713 2018
Caroline Bérubé, Doing Business in China (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K7128.S7 B53 2018
Katia Bianchini, Protecting Stateless Persons: The Implementation of the Convention Relating to the Status of the Stateless Persons Across EU States (Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE484.E7 M33 2019
Bruce MacDougall, Estoppel, 2d ed. (Toronto: LexisNexis, 2019).

This February 24 marks the 77th anniversary of Order-in-Council P.C. 1486, issued by Prime Minister Mackenzie King in 1942 to officially begin Japanese Canadian internment. All Japanese Canadians within 100 miles of the British Columbia coast – designated as a “protected area” – were forced to relocate east to the BC interior and other provinces, sometimes with only 24 hours to do so. In early March 1942, the British Columbia Security Commission was established to carry out the forced removal of Japanese Canadians. Vancouver’s Hastings Park was established as a temporary detainment center – detainees were housed in the Livestock Building – through which Japanese Canadians were routed before being moved to internment camps.

Tashme internment camp was located 14 miles southeast of Hope, BC. The 1200-acre site was originally named Fourteen Mile Ranch; the name “Tashme” was created from the names of three officers of the BC Security Commission. By May 1942, people were beginning to arrive at Tashme to begin housing construction:

Tashme Camp under construction, 1942

Construction at Tashme camp

 

In September 1942, families from Hastings Park began to arrive at Tashme, and the camp officially opened.

Japanese Canadians arriving at Tashme Camp

 

The forced removal was completed by the end of October 1942, and Hastings Park was closed. Construction at Tashme continued, including housing, bath houses, and a hospital. Farm buildings from the ranch were also renovated and repurposed. By January 1943, the camp had reached its peak population of over 2,600 residents. It was the largest BC internment camp.

Tashme Camp in winter

The hospital in winter [Tashme Camp], 1946

 

Over the next few years, Tashme functioned as a self-sufficient community. Photos in the Japanese Canadian Photograph Collection provide a glimpse of everyday life at Tashme:

View of Tashme camp

Group photograph of men at Tashme camp

Tashme Secondary School teachers, October 13 1943

Family picnics at Tashme Camp

Japanese boy with pet at Tashme Camp

 

The UBC Archives Photograph Collection also contains several photos of Tashme from the Margaret Sage fonds. Margaret Sage served as a social worker at Tashme from September 1945 to August 1946 and created a scrapbook of 97 photographs from that time.

 

Group photograph including Margaret Sage, [1946]

 

In 1945, the Canadian government gave Japanese Canadians the choice to either move east of the Rocky Mountains within Canada, or move to Japan – where many Japanese Canadians had never lived. Many Tashme residents chose “repatriation” to Japan. During this time, Japanese Canadians from other camps who opted for repatriation were also moved to Tashme. Margaret Sage’s scrapbook documents life in Tashme from 1945-1946, including photos of the repatriation process:

Loading the busses [Tashme camp], May 31 1946

Repatriation – Good bye – See you in Japan [Tashme Camp] , May 31 1946

[Japanese Canadians from Tashme Camp boarding train at Hope?], January 1 1946

 

If you’re interested in learning more about Tashme and Japanese internment, the Tashme Historical Project is an excellent resource. In addition, you can check out our previous blog posts featuring photos from the Japanese Canadian Photograph collection here. 

References

 

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