MMIWG Selected Titles

  1. Stolen Sisters: the story of two missing girls, their families, and how Canada has failed Indigenous Women by Emmannuelle Walter

In 2014, the nation was rocked by the brutal violence against young Aboriginal women Loretta Saunders, Tina Fontaine and Rinelle Harper. But tragically, they were not the only Aboriginal women to suffer that year. In fact, an official report revealed that since 1980, 1,200 Canadian Aboriginal women have been murdered or have gone missing. This alarming official figure reveals a national tragedy and the systemic failure of law enforcement and of all levels of government to address the issue.

Journalist Emmanuelle Walter spent two years investigating this crisis and has crafted a moving representative account of the disappearance of two young women, Maisy Odjick and Shannon Alexander, teenagers from western Quebec, who have been missing since September 2008. Via personal testimonies, interviews, press clippings and official documents, Walter pieces together the disappearance and loss of these two young lives, revealing these young women to us through the voices of family members and witnesses.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Highway of Tears a film by Matt Smiley

Highway of Tears‘ is about the missing or murdered women along a 724 kilometer stretch of highway in northern British Columbia. None of the 18 cold-cases since the 1960’s had been solved, until project E-Pana (a special division of the RCMP) managed to link DNA to Portland drifter, Bobby Jack Fowler with the 1974 murder of 16 year-old hitchhiker, Colleen MacMillen. In Canada, over 600 Aboriginal women have been reported missing or been murdered since the 1960s. Viewers will discover what the effects of generational poverty, residential schools, systemic violence, and high unemployment rates have done to First Nations reserves and how they tie in with the missing and murdered women in the Highway of Tearscases. Aboriginal women are considered abject victims of violence. Now find out what First Nations leaders are doing to try and swing the pendulum in the other direction.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Injustice in Indian Country: Jurisdiction, American Law, and Sexual Violence Against Native Women by Amy L. Casselman

Living at the intersection of multiple identities in the United States can be dangerous. This is especially true for Native women who live on the more than 56 million acres that comprise America’s Indian country – the legal term for American Indian reservations and other land held in trust for Native people. Today, due to a complicated system of criminal jurisdiction, non-Native Americans can commit crimes against American Indians in much of Indian country with virtual impunity. This has created what some call a modern day ‘hunting ground’ in which Native women are specifically targeted by non-Native men for sexual violence. In this urgent and timely book, author Amy L. Casselman exposes the shameful truth of how the American government has systematically divested Native nations of the basic right to protect the people in their own communities. A problem over 200 years in the making, Casselman highlights race and gender in federal law to challenge the argument that violence against Native women in Indian country is simply collateral damage from a complex but necessary legal structure. Instead, she demonstrates that what’s happening in Indiancountry is part of a violent colonial legacy – one that has always relied on legal and sexual violence to disempower Native communities as a whole. Injustice in Indian Country tells the story of American colonization through the eyes of Native women as they fight for justice. In doing so, it makes critical contributions to the fields of American law and policy, social justice and activism, women’s studies, ethnic studies, American Indian studies, and sociology.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Will I see? by Davis A. Robertson; illustrated by GMB Chomichuk

May, a young teenage girl, traverses the city streets, finding keepsakes in different places along her journey. When May and her kookum make these keepsakes into a necklace, it opens a world of danger and fantasy. While May fights against a terrible reality, she learns that there is strength in the spirit of those that have passed. But will that strength be able to save her? A story of tragedy and beauty, Will I See illuminates the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women. Based on the story by Iskwé and Erin Leslie.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Sans Nimama by Melanie Florence; illustrated by Francois Thisdale

A young mother, one of the many missing indigenous women, watches over her small daughter as she grows up without her nimama. Together, but separated, they experience important milestones: the first day of school, first dance, first date, a wedding, and new life. A free-verse story of love, loss, and acceptance told in alternating voices, Missing Nimama shows the human side of a national tragedy. An afterword by the author provides a simple, age-appropriate context for young readers.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

The National Inquiry’s Final Report reveals that persistent and deliberate human and Indigenous rights violations and abuses are the root cause behind Canada’s staggering rates of violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA people. The two volume report calls for transformative legal and social changes to resolve the crisis that has devastated Indigenous communities across the country.
The Final Report is comprised of the truths of more than 2,380 family members, survivors of violence, experts and Knowledge Keepers shared over two years of cross-country public hearings and evidence gathering. It delivers 231 individual Calls for Justice directed at governments, institutions, social service providers, industries and all Canadians.
As documented in the Final Report, testimony from family members and survivors of violence spoke about a surrounding context marked by multigenerational and intergenerational trauma and marginalization in the form of poverty, insecure housing or homelessness and barriers to education, employment, health care and cultural support. Experts and Knowledge Keepers spoke to specific colonial and patriarchal policies that displaced women from their traditional roles in communities and governance and diminished their status in society, leaving them vulnerable to violence.

Find the report online

 

Upcoming: we are currently developing a MMIWG research guide

 

Xwi7xwa would like to thank Andrea Groban-Oakunsheyld for allowing us to use their image in this spotlight series.

Xwi7xwa would like to thank Elena Pederson, Publications & Web Services Assistant, from UBC Education Library for her work on designing our digital signage.

Buses, SkyTrain, SeaBus, and the West Coast Express are the main transit options in the Greater Vancouver area today. However, Open Collections has many images of the railroads and streetcars that used to line our streets. From 1897 until 1958, the British Columbia Electric Railway (BCER) operated streetcars and interurbans, which were the major transportation options for people at that time.

Granville St., Vancouver, B.C., Post office, bank commerce & depot, [between 1908 and 1911?].

Brief History of Streetcars and Interurbans in BC

The first streetcar services in BC began in Victoria, operated by the National Electric Tramway and Lighting Company Ltd., in February 1890. Four months later, the first regular streetcar service was started in Vancouver by Vancouver Electric Railway and Light Company Ltd. By October 1891, the service area was expanded to New Westminster by the Westminster and Vancouver Tramway Company. The company also launched Canada’s longest interurban line between Vancouver and New Westminster. Eventually, the three companies merged as the British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited (BCER) on April 3, 1897, and started to manage all of the transportation services.

Map and guide to Vancouver street car and interurban lines, 1923.

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. Tips for tourists: interurban trips over B.C. Electric Railway system, in vicinity of Vancouver, British Columbia, [1913?].

The following are photographs depicting streetcars in BC from the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

Park Drive, Grand View, [between 1903 and 1908?].

[View of a trolley car on Davie Street, Vancouver], [between 1900 and 1910?].

[Sketch of interior of Main Street streetcar, Vancouver, B.C.], [not after 1914].

 

You can also find interurban lines in the BC Historical Books Collection:

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. British Columbia Electric Railway Co. Ltd. : N.E.L.A. Convention, Seattle, June 10-14, 1912, [1912].

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. B.C. Electric Handbook and Directory, 1929.

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. Tips for tourists: interurban trips over B.C. Electric Railway system, in vicinity of Vancouver, British Columbia, [1913?].

Observation Streetcars

Around 1909, BCER purchased the designs of open-air sightseeing cars from the Montreal Tramways Company and constructed the cars in New Westminster. Thadeous (Teddy) Sylvester Lyons was a popular tour conductor, known for his wit and jokes while operating this service until it stopped running in 1950.

[B.C. Electric Railway Co. tour conducted by Ted Lyons, Vancouver, B.C.], [between 1923 and 1949?].

UBC Motor Buses

Motor buses were the main transit option for students and employees heading to UBC. In Carrying the People ([1929]) by British Columbia Electric Railway Company, UBC was considered the busiest route:

The U.B.C. Rush

Consider the problem of the University. Between 8 o’clock and 9.15 in the morning, transportation is required for more than fifteen hundred students and no sooner is this accomplished than the traffic falls off to nothing. In the afternoon the same surge occurs in the opposite direction and then zero in traffic again. […] There is no busier spot in Vancouver than this transfer point as the University rush is at its height each morning. (pp.7-8)

UBC 93.1/18. University bus, 1926.

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. Carrying the People, [1929].

The End of Streetcars/Interurbans Services

Around the time of the Second World War, the BCER streetcar and interurban services were approaching their end due to the high cost of maintaining the train tracks. The BCER decided to do “Rails-to-Rubbers” conversion throughout the entire transit system, changing from streetcars using tracks to buses with rubber tires.

The final run of Vancouver’s streetcar was in 1955. The last interurban car ran between Marpole and Steveston on February 28, 1958, and the rail passenger service by BCER ended.

Ever since the BC government took over the BCER in 1961, we have used “rubber” buses and automated trains as our primary transportation tools in BC. At UBC Vancouver campus, there are 15 bus routes to Metro Vancouver and two routes serving on-campus areas today.

UBC 1.1/15762. Students boarding bus in front of Home Economics Building, 1971.

 

If you want to explore more materials about BC transportation history, please visit our Open Collections.

References

Ya Min Wu has worked at UBC Library for the last five years. But his experience working with Chinese rare books goes back even earlier.

“Before I came to Canada [in 2001], I worked in a public library in China, Liaoning Provincial Library. I was there for about 15 years,” he says. “I primarily worked on the Chinese rare books, so I have lots of time spent on rare books authentication, cataloguing and some preservation.”

Moving from China to Canada with his family, he switched tracks to work in business and manufacturing in Vancouver for the next decade before returning to library work at a small company in Burnaby that provided library services to the Richmond, Burnaby and Vancouver Public Libraries. Later, when an opportunity came up to work at UBC Library, he joined the Technical Services team in 2014 to work with Chinese language materials.

“UBC has a great Chinese rare book collection. It’s a huge collection, outside China,” he says, noting that the entire collection includes about 4,000 titles in 60,000 volumes, making UBC a top-tier research library for Chinese Studies in North America.

One of his first major projects at the library was to work on Discovering Modern China, a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) project that involved close collaboration between UBC’s Asian Library and the University of Washington East Asia Library to catalogue large volumes of valuable but hidden scholarly material: “At Asian Library there are lots of uncatalogued materials that have not been touched before. We worked very hard, together with some student assistants and Asian Library’s Chinese Studies Librarian to originally catalogue more than 1,000 items in one year.”

In 2018, the library got funding support through donors to work on the Puban Collection, UBC’s largest Chinese rare books collection, consisting of 45,000 volumes spanning subject fields like history, literature, philology and philosophy. Ya Min’s work is now centered on the Puban Collection, both cataloguing the collection and planning for its future storage, preservation, conservation and digitization.

“The project is focused on how to organize and make the Puban Collection support teaching and research. For the past 60 years, the collection has helped to make UBC Asian Studies one of the best in the world,” he says. “So how can it benefit new students in the future? This is the project.”

In honour of the 60th anniversary of the Library’s acquisition of the Puban Collection in 1959, Ya Min Wu will be hosting bi-weekly tours highlighting items from the collection at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections. Learn more about the tours.

Click on the book cover to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

Inquiry-based early learning environments : creating, supporting, and collaborating / Susan Stacey.

Call Number:LB1139.23 .S727 2019 

Teach like yourself : how authentic teaching transforms our students and ourselves / Gravity Goldberg.

Call Number:LB1025.3 .G647 2019 

Lab class : professional learning through collaborative inquiry and student observation / Lisa Cranston.

Call Number:LB1731 .C675 2019 

Worth a thousand words : using graphic novels to teach visual and verbal literacy / Meryl J. Jaffe and Talia Hurwich.

Call Number:LB1044.9.C59 J35 2019 

 

Notice to visitors: An unexpected closure of the reading room is necessary as of June 13th at 11:00 a.m. We hope to re-open as conditions permit and will post an update as soon as possible. For immediate assistance please call 604-822-2521 or email rare.books@ubc.ca

 

Deputy University Librarian

UBC Library | Vancouver Campus

Full-time, ongoing Librarian position, five year renewable administrative term as Deputy University Librarian

Anticipated Start Date: September 1, 2019

 

Opportunity 

The University of British Columbia seeks a senior leader to serve as Deputy University Librarian, a key member of the leadership team who will be instrumental in the implementation of the UBC Library’s Strategic Framework. 

UBC Library

Established in 1908, UBC has consistently ranked among the top fifty universities in the world. It is a publicly supported, comprehensive university comprising 18 faculties and several schools across two campuses. UBC’s sees its purpose as preparing students to become exceptional global citizens, promoting the values of a civil and sustainable society, and conducting outstanding research to serve the people of British Columbia, Canada, and the world.

The UBC Library is among the three largest academic research library systems in Canada and has 16 branches and divisions at 11 library locations. There are 250 full-time equivalent employees – librarians, management and professional staff, and support staff – and a temporary hourly staff complement of over 200 students work in the UBC Library system. The UBC Library participates in the broader research library community as a member of both the Canadian Association of Research Libraries and the Association of Research Libraries.

Position Overview

Reporting to the University Librarian, the Deputy University Librarian is a key member of the Library’s Executive team and a leader of change. Working collaboratively with the University Librarian and other colleagues in the Library and the larger University community, the Deputy University Librarian provides leadership in the implementation of the Library’s strategic framework, including reconfiguration and implementation of services based on outcomes of the strategic framework. The Deputy University Librarian supports the University Librarian in the administration of the Library including development and assessment of services and spaces, budget management and assessment of librarianship/teaching, research, and service activities of the Library.

The Deputy University Librarian will assume overall responsibility for a portfolio including Finance & Facilities, Assessment and University Archives. Leadership of public service and other areas will be required as well as general flexibility in taking on new responsibilities in a changing environment. The Deputy University Librarian collaborates with department heads; provides oversight of operations and budgets; and provides leadership for projects and other initiatives supporting the strategic direction of the Library.

QUALIFICATIONS

Required

  • A graduate degree from an accredited school of Library, Archival and Information Science.
  • A successful record of leadership, planning, developing and managing library programs and services.
  • Proven administrative, public relations, and managerial skills, gained through at least five years of experience in library management positions.
  • Experience with organizational change and change management best practices. Ability to develop and implement strategic change enablement plans
  • Creative yet practical in finding new solutions, developing processes, reconfiguring services.
  • Proven planning, budgeting, and project management skills. 
  • Experience with large scale renovations of library spaces.
  • Success with donor relations, experience in fundraising. 
  • Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to function effectively as a member of a senior management team working within a collegial environment and experience in building and managing relationships at all levels of the organization.
  • Excellent oral and written communication and presentation skills, and proven research abilities. 
  • Demonstrated familiarity with developments in higher education and the issues facing research libraries, especially in North America, and an understanding of academic and scholarly processes.
  • A proven commitment to service excellence and a vision of research library services in the 21st century and the skills to advocate for and communicate that vision.
  • Ability to exercise a high level of diplomacy, tact and discretion when working with information of a confidential and/or sensitive nature and in dealing with various levels of senior administration and external agencies.
  • Dedicated to cultivating an inclusive environment that recognizes barriers faced by people and encourages and incorporates contributions from diverse groups and individuals.
  • Contributes to the Library’s sense of community and achievement of common goals through cooperation across units/groups and encouragement of equitable and balanced involvement in decision making.
  • Promotes and fosters a supportive environment built on appreciation, recognition, learning and professional growth.
  • Works to build a team environment built on positive working relationships, provides guidance and resources to teams while trusting them to excel.
  • Creates a supportive and open environment where everyone is able to listen, contribute and engage with colleagues and ideas and provide and receive timely, constructive feedback.
  • Creates an environment that embraces curiosity, ideas, creativity and innovation and provides opportunities and flexibility to explore new initiatives.
  • An additional graduate degree with an emphasis on management is preferred.

WORKING RELATIONSHIPS:

Works under the general direction of the University Librarian and in collaboration with other members of the Library Executive Team, division/branch heads and managers, and other staff including at UBC Okanagan. 

DUTIES:

Library Leadership

  • Working closely with the University Librarian and other Library stakeholders, the Deputy University Librarian collaborates with the Library Executive Team and Heads on the implementation of the strategic plan.
  • Provision of strategic leadership and stewardship to the realization of the vision of the Library, and portfolio goals.
  • In consultation with the University Librarian, oversees management of Library budget and makes recommendations to the University Librarian on budget reallocations, opportunities for efficiencies and cost reduction opportunities.   Supports the University Librarian in the securing of grants, foundation support, industry partnerships and philanthropy.
  • Works with Associate University Librarians to assess, review and identify funding sources for new services, new programs and changes in the delivery of existing services to the Library’s communities of users.
  • In consultation with the University Librarian and in collaboration with the Library Executive Team, the Deputy University Librarian will develop strategic recommendations and system-wide policies related to the operation and development of the Library and its services.
  • In consultation with the University Librarian and the Library Executive Team, the Deputy University Librarian will be involved in the assessment of Library program and services as they related to the evolving needs of Students and Faculty.
  • Provides the leadership necessary to develop programs within the portfolio. Keeps portfolio informed of the Library’s policies, plans, and priorities, and fosters understanding of and support for these.  Keeps the University Librarian and colleagues in Library Administration informed of developments in the portfolio.
  • Works with Library Facilities to ensure that the University provides appropriate space for reporting branches/units and, in consultation with Heads/Assistant Directors, ensures that the spaces are appropriate for an evolving service model.
  • Maintains a comprehensive understanding of developments affecting academic librarianship
  • Represents the University Librarian, at his/her request and in his/her absence in the capacity of Acting University Librarian
  • Represents the University Librarian in meetings with representatives of the Faculty Association. 
  • Participates actively in the Library’s fundraising and donor stewardship activities.
  • Represents the University Librarian on Senate committees and other university committees as required.

Portfolio Leadership

  • With input from Heads/Directors/Assistant Directors, prepares budget requests and allocates/monitors resources to ensure portfolio priorities are met.  May work to secure grants, foundation support, and industry partnerships. Ensures that expenditures are managed and controlled. 
  • Ensures that the needs of library users and opportunities for new programs, systems and services are assessed regularly through consultation with Heads/Directors/Assistant Directors, and through them with students, staff, faculty, and other stakeholders.  Ensures that curriculum changes and program developments affecting the portfolio are reviewed.
  • Leads and participates in projects, working groups and committees related to areas of responsibility.
  • In consultation with Heads/Assistant Directors, determines the skills needed for reporting branches/units and plans for staff development and training.  Works to enable a highly supportive work environment.
  • Maintains good working relationships with Deans, Associate Deans, senior UBC administrators, community groups, and others to support the work of the Library and portfolio.  Participates in departmental, faculty, and other meetings as necessary.
  • Strategic leadership in the effective use of the physical facility and all related operational and administrative matters.

TERMS OF APPOINTMENT AND SALARY

This position will be filled as a full-time, ongoing Librarian position with a five year renewable administrative term as Deputy University Librarian. If eligible and qualified, the successful applicant may be appointed with a confirmed appointment. Otherwise, there will be an initial three-year probationary appointment.  Normally, such an appointment is reviewed by the end of the second year of the appointment, and a recommendation is made at that time to grant or not to grant a confirmed appointment.

Salary will be commensurate with experience and academic/professional qualifications.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

To view the complete job description and to submit an application, please visit the UBC Careers page at http://www.hr.ubc.ca/careers-postings/faculty.php by July 15th, 2019.

The application package should include a statement illustrating how a candidate’s experience relates to the requirements of this position.

As part of our renewal of the IBISWorld database, UBC will have access to a new set of industry reports: the US NAICS Specialized Collection. An additional module has been obtained for the next year (until June 10, 2020). This is the Ontario Provincial Industry Reports. The US Specialized Industry Database is a collection of […]

 

 

Above image is courtesy of the International Open Access Week site

 

This year’s 2019 International Open Access Week theme is “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge” as recently announced by the 2019 Open Access Week Advisory Committee

 

The International Open Access Week – happening on October 21-27, 2019 – provides an opportunity for all “to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives”, as per SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition).

 

Building on last year’s theme, “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge,” this year’s theme will focus on answering the following questions:

 

  • Whose interests are being prioritized in the actions we take and in the platforms that we support?

 

  • Whose voices are excluded? Are underrepresented groups included as full partners from the beginning?

 

  • Are we supporting not only open access but also equitable participation in research communication?

 

 

Learn more about open access at UBC and beyond via the following ways:

 

Check out the UBC Library’s Open Access page in the coming months

 

Visit the open.ubc.ca site for more Open Access resources

 

View and download 70 Open Access Week items in cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, UBC Library has 15 branches in 12 locations that provide a variety of programs and services. The Digitization Centre is located in Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (IKBLC) on UBC’s Vancouver campus. A previous post explored how IKBLC has changed since the first Main Library was built, so we will delve into the history of UBC Library buildings from UBC Archives Photograph Collection.

Asian Library

The Asian Library provides services relevant to Asian language materials and is currently located in the Asian Centre. Prior to the Asian Library being officially designated a UBC Library branch in 1975, all the Asian language materials were stored in the Main Library.

UBC 1.1/9121. Asian studies desk in Main Library. 1971.

Banham, Jim. UBC 41.1/981-2. Move of Asian Studies Library to Asian Centre, 1981.

Biomedical Branch Library

The Biomedical Branch Library is located in the Gordon and Leslie Diamond Health Care Centre, which includes UBC Faculty of Medicine facilities. It was opened at Vancouver General Hospital in 1952 as the first official branch of the Main Library, and moved to the present location in 1957.

UBC 81.1/5. Faculty of Medicine building (Vancouver General Hospital) entrance, 1958.

David Lam Management Research Library

The David Lam Management Research Library provides library programs and services for the areas of business administration and commerce and is located in UBC Sauder School of Business at Vancouver campus. The library opened in 1985 with a donation from Dr. David See-Chai Lam, British Columbia’s former Lieutenant-Governor. It officially became a branch of UBC Library in 1993.

UBC 8.1/108. David Lam Research Library plaque, 1986.

UBC 44.1/3103. David Lam pours concrete for construction of David Lam Management Research Centre, 1991.

UBC 44.1/2828b. David Lam Management Research Centre, 1996.

Walter C. Koerner Library

We can trace the history of the Walter C. Koerner Library back to 1960, when the Main Library was the only building UBC Library managed. In 1960, the College Library was established inside the Main Library to provide library services for first- and second-year students. It changed its name to Sedgewick Library in 1964, in honour of Dr. Garnett Sedgewick, a former professor and head of the Department of English. As its collection grew, UBC Library opened a new building for Sedgewick in the current location of Koerner Library in 1973.

UBC 1.1/2327. Entrance to Sedgewick Library, [between 1960 and 1969].

Banham, Jim. UBC 41.1/2306. Sedgewick Library, 1973.

UBC 41.1/2247-2. Sedgewick Library stairwell, 1975.

Construction of Koerner Library began in 1995 by adding 7,000 square metres to 10,200 square metres of the renovated space from Sedgewick Library. The current library name is in honour of Walter Charles Koerner, a Canadian businessman who generously supported the construction of the library in addition to other philanthropic contributions to the University overall.

UBC 44.1/3082. Construction of Koerner Library, 1995.

UBC 44.1/3152. View of area for W. C. Koerner Library opening ceremonies, 1997.

 

Law Library

The Law Library is located in Peter A. Allard School of Law at Vancouver campus. It was formed in 1945, and initially housed in a World War II army hut. As a result of contributions from donors, the library moved to a new law building in 1951, and redesigned its space in 1975, concurrently with the renovation of the George F. Curtis Faculty of Law building.

UBC 3.1/613. Huts behind library.

UBC 1.1/5748-2. Students in Law Library, 1952.

 

Woodward Library

Woodward Library is accessed from the inside the Instructional Resources Centre (IRC), and its physical collection covers all medicine, sciences, and engineering areas, except for Math and Computer Science. The initial division started from the Medical Reading Room in the Main Library in 1950. The Woodward Library was opened in 1964 with a generaous gift of fundings from Mr. and Mrs. P.A. Woodward’s Foundation. After expanding its space in 1970, the Library absorbed the collections of MacMillan Library, which included the area of Land and Food Systems and Forestry in 2006, and Science and Engineering collections from the Main Library in 2013.

UBC 1.1/11465-1. MacMillan Library showing the bookshelves, 1967.

UBC 3.1/1234-2. Woodward Biomedical architectural sketches, 1963.

UBC 3.1/1240. Sign announcing the building of Woodward Library, [between 1960 and 1969].

UBC 3.1/1451-1. View of Woodward Library, 1964.

Holborne, Peter. UBC 1.1/12478. Woodward Biomedical Library, 1971.

Xwi7xwa Library

Xwi7xwa Library is the only Indigenous branch of an academic library in Canada, and officially became a branch of UBC Library in 2005. It is located at the eastern end of the Longhouse, built in 1993. The building’s design is modeled after structures built by Interior Salish nations, called Kekuli in the chinook language, a pit house in English, and S7ístken in Ucwalmícwts (Lil’wat nation).

UBC 106.1/22. Construction of Xwi7xwa Library, 1993.

 

We hope you will visit each branch and experience the history and evolution of UBC Library. Visit UBC Archives Photograph Collection to find more library photographs.

References

 

Rare Books and Special Collections and University Archives, located on the lower level of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, are currently closed. We apologize for any inconvenience. If you have questions please call 604-822-2521.

 

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet