The 17th World Sanskrit Conference logo

The 17th World Sanskrit Conference logo

 

 

 

Convened under the auspices of the International Association of Sanskrit Studies, the triennial World Sanskrit Conference is the premier international forum for professional researchers and educators of the Sanskrit language and its literatures, and of the history, religion, and cultures of pre-modern South Asia.

 

Attracting 600+ delegates from across the globe, the 17th WSC was held in Vancouver, Canada from July 9-13, 2018 and was the first time that this prestigious event was held in Canada.

 

Within cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository, this online collection houses the Proceedings of the 17th WSC including selected full-length papers from the 500 presentations approved for inclusion in the conference programme by the WSC2018 Academic Advisory Board. The papers within certain Sections were subject to formal peer review. Note: Papers will continue to be released on a rolling basis.

 

cIRcle is thrilled to have made these 17th WSC proceedings openly accessible via the Library’s Open Collections digital collection portal and looks forward to preserving them over the long-term for scholarly researchers and beyond for many years to come.

 

Browse the WSC2018 collection

 

Visit the WSC2018 website

 

Learn more about cIRcle

 

 

 

 

INDIC

PK2098 N3 G42 2017
Ghāṭa kā patthara / Gulaśana Nandā

PK2098.19 V5146 Z75 2018
Kahīṃ kucha nahīṃ / Śaśibhūshaṇa Dvivedī

PK2098.32 R475 A85 2018
अशोक राजपथ / अवधेश प्रीत

PK2099.34 N52 B33 2018
Badasūrata ādamī : kahānī-saṅgraha / Raṇīrāma Gaṛhavālī

PK2099.39 I45 U47 2018
Umra jitanā lambā pyāra / Sapanā Siṃha = Umra jitna lamba pyar / by Sapna Singh


CHINESE

DS777.488 F794 A3 2018
傅秉常日記 : 民國四十七-五十年 / 傅秉常著 ; 傅錡華, 張力校註

DS777.488 C5 G862 2017 v.1-16
國史館現藏總統副總統檔案目錄 : 蔣中正 /《國史館現藏總統副總統檔案目錄蔣中正》編輯委員會编

PL2306 W79 2018
诗画融通论 / 吴企明著

PL2448 S4 2017
宋代金石图谱研究 / 史正浩著

PL2623 T39 2017
他乡的天空 ; 摩尔宮殿的秘密 / 北岛等著


JAPANESE

B5244 M674 K86 2018
本居宣長 / 熊野純彦

DS822.2 Y349 2018
教科書には書かれていない江戶時代 / 山本博文

HQ21 S6245163 2018
統計学はときにセクシーな学問である / デビッド・シュピーゲルハルター著 ; 石塚直樹訳

JQ1631 R57 2018
律令国家の理想と現実 / 古瀬奈津子編

NK4784 A1 S27 2018
猿楽と面 : 大和・近江および白山の周辺から / Miho Museum 編 ; 監修伊東史朗

Book covers featuring portrayals of children enjoying being independent and active outdoors in a variety of ways is a great way to model an active lifestyle as well as norming differences in mobility. When selecting books for a display, try to intentionally include titles with bright, cheerful, engaging covers like these portraying all kinds of kids zipping and zooming their way through life.

Featured titles:

Emmanuel’s dream: the true story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah / by Laurie Ann Thompson; illustrated by Sean Qualls.

Summary: Born in Ghana, West Africa, with one deformed leg, he was dismissed by most people — but not by his mother, who taught him to reach for his dreams. As a boy, Emmanuel hopped to school more than two miles each way, learned to play soccer, left home at age thirteen to provide for his family, and, eventually, became a cyclist. He rode an astonishing four hundred miles across Ghana in 2001, spreading his powerful message: disability is not inability. Today, Emmanuel continues to work on behalf of the disabled.

 

Pedal it!: how bicycles are changing the world / Michelle Mulder.

Summary: Pedal It! celebrates the humble bicycle–from the very first boneshakers to the sleek racing bikes of today, from handlebars to spokes to gear sprockets–and shows you why and how bikes can make the world a better place. Not only can bikes be used to power computers and generators, they can also reduce pollution, promote wellness and get a package across a crowded city–fast! Informative but not didactic, Pedal It! encourages young readers to be part of the joy of cycling.

Don’t call me special: a first look at disability / Pat Thomas; illustrated by Lesley Harker.

Summary: This picture book explores questions and concerns about disability in a simple and reassuring way. Younger children can find out what a disability is, and learn how people deal with their disabilities to live happy and full lives. Written by a psychotherapist and counselor, this book helps to foster acceptance and tolerance of people who are in some way “different.”

On a slippery slope / Melody Fitzpatrick.

Summary: If a super-cute boy (one you really want to impress) assumes that you’re a championship skier and snowboarder, is it really that big of a deal if you don’t set him straight? When a teensy fib starts snowballing out of control, Hannah Smart realizes she needs cash to keep from being found out. She takes a part-time job at the local TV station where her dad works as the weatherman. After nearly killing a woman (it was an accident!) and then saving her life on air, Hannah unexpectedly finds herself in front of the camera again. Loving the spotlight, Hannah is swept up in the excitement of TV land, but with the school ski trip coming up, she soon realizes that some secrets are almost impossible to keep hidden. But wanting to come clean and doing it are two very different things.

The red bicycle: the extraordinary story of one ordinary bicycle / written by Jude Isabella; illustrated by Simone Shin.

Summary: When Leo outgrows his bicycle, it finds a new home with Alisetta, who uses it to access to her family’s sorghum field and the market.

A crash course for Molly / Eva Eriksson; translated by Elisabeth Kallick Dyssegaard.

Summary: Watch out! Here comes Molly! Molly is big enough and smart enough to ride a bike now – and she loves it! Trouble is, Molly can’t seem to stop running into things. She keeps her eye on the objects in her path – like poles and people – but for some reason she still hits them. Luckily, she bumps into a driving instructor one day, and he gives Molly some useful advice. Using warmly colored and expressive illustrations, Eva Eriksson once again gives readers an adorable little girl to cheer for as she takes a crash course in bike riding.

Check out these articles for more information :

Ostrosky, M. M., Mouzourou, C., Dorsey, et al (2015). Pick a Book, Any Book: Using Children’s Books to Support Positive Attitudes Toward Peers With Disabilities. Young Exceptional Children18(1), 30–43. https://doi.org/10.1177/1096250613512666

Emily A. Roper & Alexandra M. Clifton (2013) The Representation of Physically Active Girls in Children’s Picture Books, Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 84:2, 147-156, DOI: 10.1080/02701367.2013.784844

The Canadian video game industry involves the development, marketing, and monetization of video games in Canada. This industry overview will discuss the latest statistics and trends for the video game industry in Canada. For more information on the video game industry please see our Video Game Industry Guide.

Photo credit: Photo by Alexas_Fotos

Key Takeaways

  • Thriving industry: Canada’s video game industry contributed $3.7 billion to the economy in 2017 (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Export-driven industry: Exports accounted for 75% of industry revenue in 2017 (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Nation of gamers: 61% of the national population currently identifies as video gamers (ESAC, 2018).
  • Shifting demographics: 39 is the average age of Canadian video gamers, with 50% being male, and 50% being female (ESAC, 2018).
  • Consumer preferences: 46% of Canadians prefer to play video games most often on their mobile devices (ESAC, 2018).

Industry Performance Snapshot

  • Total revenue among video game companies in Canada was $3.2 billion in 2017, while total expenditure was $2.6 billion (ESAC, 2017).
  • In 2017, exports accounted for 75% of all revenue generated by video game companies in Canada. The US and Europe were the top sources of export revenue at 46% and 42% respectively (Nordicity, 2017).
  • During 2015-2017, total GDP generated by the Canadian video game industry increased by 24% to just over $3.7 billion (Nordicity, 2017).

Industry Output

  • About 2,100 video game projects were completed in 2017, with web (31%) and mobile platforms (29%) accounting for the largest proportions (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Family-oriented games were the most popular genre in 2017, accounting for 26% of all video game projects completed that year (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Budgets for console projects decreased by 26% to $12.5 million in 2017. Despite this, console games still accounted for 89% of all production spending (Nordicity, 2017).

Cost Breakdown

Source: Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

Consumer Spending

Between July 2017 and June 2018, Canadians spent a total of $8.1 billion on digital products. Online gaming subscriptions, game downloads, and in-game purchases accounted for 16.7% of overall spending. Consumers between the ages of 25-34 were the largest group of spenders. This group accounted for about 35% of total spending or $471 million.

Source: Statistics Canada. Table 3: Total Spending on Digital Products, from July 2017 to June 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/180829/t003b-eng.htm
 

Source: Statistics Canada. Table 3: Total Spending on Digital Products, from July 2017 to June 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/180829/t003b-eng.htm

Business Locations

As the following chart illustrates, the majority of Canada’s video game companies are located in three provinces: Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia. This has remained consistent since 2013.

Source: Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

Employment Statistics

In 2017, the Canadian video game industry directly employed 21,800 employees. Quebec was Canada’s top employer with 10,000 employees or 45.9%% of the total number of employees in Canada’s video game industry in 2017.

Source: Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

Trends and Changes

Changing demographics

  • The average age of Canadian video gamers is on the rise. The average Canadian video gamer was 39 years of age in 2018 (ESAC, 2018), compared to 36 in 2017 (ESAC, 2017).
  • The number of female gamers is on the rise. In 2018, 50% of Canadian video gamers were female (ESAC, 2018), compared with 49% in 2017 (ESAC, 2017).

Parents as gamers

  • Canadian parents are not only purchases of video games, but also active consumers of them. 71% of parents played video games with their children (ESAC, 2018) in 2018, compared with 68% of parents in 2016 (ESAC, 2016).

Popularity of Mobile gaming

  • 46% of Canadians played video games most often on their mobile devices in 2018 (ESAC, 2018), compared to 41% in 2016 (ESAC, 2016).
  • Although more Canadians are playing video games on their mobile devices, the market for computers and consoles still remains strong (see below).

Source: ESAC. (2018). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/ESAC18_BookletEN.pdf

Emergence of Virtual Reality (VR) gaming

  • The Canadian game industry is accelerating production of VR games, with companies reporting over 250 new VR projects in 2016 alone (Nordicity, 2017).
  • As of 2018, 8% of Canadians already own a VR system (ESAC, 2018).

Social gaming as a global trend

  • Since 2017, social/casual gaming revenue has overtaken traditional gaming revenue to become the largest component of the video games market (PwC, Entertainment & Media Outlook, n.d.)
  • In Canada, social or casual games are stills the fastest growing area of the video games market. Since 2015, they have made up over 50% of Canada’s total video games revenue (PwC, Entertainment & Media Outlook, n.d.).
  • Online, free-to-play, battle royale games such as Fortnite are at the forefront of the social gaming trends. More video game publishers will likely try and emulate Fortnite’s business model to remain competitive (PwC, Entertainment & Media Outlook, n.d.).

Sources

ESAC. (2018). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry 2018. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/ESAC18_BookletEN.pdf

ESAC. (2017). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry 2017. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/ESAC2017_Booklet_13_Digital.pdf

ESAC. (2016). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry 2016. Retrieved from:
http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016_booklet_Web.compressed2.pdf

Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

PwC. (n.d.). Entertainment & Media Outlook 2019-2023. Retrieved from: https://www.pwc.com/ca/en/industries/entertainment-media/outlook-2019-2023.html

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 3: Total Spending on Digital Products, from July 2017 to June 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/180829/t003b-eng.htm

Industry Trends

The Canadian video game industry involves the development, marketing, and monetization of video games in Canada. This industry overview will discuss the latest statistics and trends for the video game industry in Canada. For more information on the video game industry please see our Video Game Industry Guide.

Photo credit: Photo by Alexas_Fotos

Key Takeaways

  • Thriving industry: Canada’s video game industry contributed $3.7 billion to the economy in 2017 (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Export-driven industry: Exports accounted for 75% of industry revenue in 2017 (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Nation of gamers: 61% of the national population currently identifies as video gamers (ESAC, 2018).
  • Shifting demographics: 39 is the average age of Canadian video gamers, with 50% being male, and 50% being female (ESAC, 2018).
  • Consumer preferences: 46% of Canadians prefer to play video games most often on their mobile devices (ESAC, 2018).

Industry Performance Snapshot

  • Total revenue among video game companies in Canada was $3.2 billion in 2017, while total expenditure was $2.6 billion (ESAC, 2017).
  • In 2017, exports accounted for 75% of all revenue generated by video game companies in Canada. The US and Europe were the top sources of export revenue at 46% and 42% respectively (Nordicity, 2017).
  • During 2015-2017, total GDP generated by the Canadian video game industry increased by 24% to just over $3.7 billion (Nordicity, 2017).

Industry Output

  • About 2,100 video game projects were completed in 2017, with web (31%) and mobile platforms (29%) accounting for the largest proportions (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Family-oriented games were the most popular genre in 2017, accounting for 26% of all video game projects completed that year (Nordicity, 2017).
  • Budgets for console projects decreased by 26% to $12.5 million in 2017. Despite this, console games still accounted for 89% of all production spending (Nordicity, 2017).

Cost Breakdown

Source: Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

Consumer Spending

Between July 2017 and June 2018, Canadians spent a total of $8.1 billion on digital products. Online gaming subscriptions, game downloads, and in-game purchases accounted for 16.7% of overall spending. Consumers between the ages of 25-34 were the largest group of spenders. This group accounted for about 35% of total spending or $471 million.

Source: Statistics Canada. Table 3: Total Spending on Digital Products, from July 2017 to June 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/180829/t003b-eng.htm
 

Source: Statistics Canada. Table 3: Total Spending on Digital Products, from July 2017 to June 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/180829/t003b-eng.htm

Business Locations

As the following chart illustrates, the majority of Canada’s video game companies are located in three provinces: Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia. This has remained consistent since 2013.

Source: Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

Employment Statistics

In 2017, the Canadian video game industry directly employed 21,800 employees. Quebec was Canada’s top employer with 10,000 employees or 45.9%% of the total number of employees in Canada’s video game industry in 2017.

Source: Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

Trends and Changes

Changing demographics

  • The average age of Canadian video gamers is on the rise. The average Canadian video gamer was 39 years of age in 2018 (ESAC, 2018), compared to 36 in 2017 (ESAC, 2017).
  • The number of female gamers is on the rise. In 2018, 50% of Canadian video gamers were female (ESAC, 2018), compared with 49% in 2017 (ESAC, 2017).

Parents as gamers

  • Canadian parents are not only purchases of video games, but also active consumers of them. 71% of parents played video games with their children (ESAC, 2018) in 2018, compared with 68% of parents in 2016 (ESAC, 2016).

Popularity of Mobile gaming

  • 46% of Canadians played video games most often on their mobile devices in 2018 (ESAC, 2018), compared to 41% in 2016 (ESAC, 2016).
  • Although more Canadians are playing video games on their mobile devices, the market for computers and consoles still remains strong (see below).

Source: ESAC. (2018). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/ESAC18_BookletEN.pdf

Emergence of Virtual Reality (VR) gaming

  • The Canadian game industry is accelerating production of VR games, with companies reporting over 250 new VR projects in 2016 alone (Nordicity, 2017).
  • As of 2018, 8% of Canadians already own a VR system (ESAC, 2018).

Social gaming as a global trend

  • Since 2017, social/casual gaming revenue has overtaken traditional gaming revenue to become the largest component of the video games market (PwC, Entertainment & Media Outlook, n.d.)
  • In Canada, social or casual games are stills the fastest growing area of the video games market. Since 2015, they have made up over 50% of Canada’s total video games revenue (PwC, Entertainment & Media Outlook, n.d.).
  • Online, free-to-play, battle royale games such as Fortnite are at the forefront of the social gaming trends. More video game publishers will likely try and emulate Fortnite’s business model to remain competitive (PwC, Entertainment & Media Outlook, n.d.).

Sources

ESAC. (2018). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry 2018. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/ESAC18_BookletEN.pdf

ESAC. (2017). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry 2017. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/ESAC2017_Booklet_13_Digital.pdf

ESAC. (2016). Essential Facts about the Canadian Video Game Industry 2016. Retrieved from:
http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2016_booklet_Web.compressed2.pdf

Nordicity. (2017). Canada’s Video Game Industry in 2017 – Final Report. Retrieved from: http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ESAC-Video-Games-in-Canada-Profile-2017_FINAL.pdf

PwC. (n.d.). Entertainment & Media Outlook 2019-2023. Retrieved from: https://www.pwc.com/ca/en/industries/entertainment-media/outlook-2019-2023.html

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 3: Total Spending on Digital Products, from July 2017 to June 2018. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/180829/t003b-eng.htm

Industry Trends

Next Monday is BC Day! To celebrate, this post will introduce our BC Historical Documents collection and explore the early history of BC.

Rare Books and Special Collections in the UBC Library houses an abundance of original documents related to the development of British Columbia and its economic, social, political and cultural history. We have digitized more than 1,500 items from 9 archival and special collections dated from 1789 to 1970, including the following fonds and collections:


Columbia (Ship) fonds

The fonds consists of two bound copies of the logs of the Columbia Rediviva (commonly known as Columbia), a privately-owned ship operated around 1800. It was known as the first non-Indigenous vessel to enter the Columbia River.

[Copy of a part of Haswell’s Log of the Columbia covering his trips of the Washington to the vicinity of Fuca Strait between March 16th and April 23rd 1789.], 1789.

This handwritten transcribed copy is Robert Haswell (1768-1801)’s log of the Columbia. Haswell was an American maritime fur trader to the Pacific Northwest of North America and enrolled as the third mate on the Columbia.

 

[Photostatic copy of Captain Robert Gray’s log for the Columbia in 1791. It records voyages along the northwest coast of Washington State and British Columbia.]

This is the photostatic copy of Captain Robert Gray (1755-1806)’s log for the Columbia. Gray was an American explorer who named the Columbia River after his ship.

 

Henry Doyle fonds

Henry Doyle (1874-1961) was the manager of Doyle Fishing Company (Canadian Division) and the first manager of the British Columbia Packers’ Association. The fonds consists of 666 items pertaining to the Pacific fishery industry.

Doyle, Henry. Original cannery fish wharf, Mill Bay, [between 1905 and 1915].

[Doyle, H., Manager, Kincolith Packing Co. Ltd., to G. J. Desbarats, Deputy Minister Naval Service, regarding establishing a closed season for halibut fishing], 1915.

Proposed Fish and Shellfish Cannery Inspection Act, [between 1895 and 1915].


Hastings Saw Mill Company fonds

Hastings Saw Mill Company was launched in 1867 by the B.C. and Vancouver Island Spar Lumber and Saw Mill Company (Stamps Mill) on Burrard Inlet. The previous owner was Heatley & Company of London until 1928. The fonds includes around 90 items such as correspondence, memos, maps, photographs, plans, and articles of association.

British Columbia Mills, Timber and Trading [Company’s], Hastings Sawmills, Vancouver, B.C.

[Turnour, J.B. to A.N. Birch, regarding : Spare at Burrard Inlet], [1865].

[Map: traced from map of Vancouver Island, showing the position of the timber lands surveyed and sought to be acquired by the Hastings Saw Mill Company Limited. Oct. 1871. by E. Stephens], 1871.


John Keenlyside Legal Research Collection

The collection was collected by John S. Keenlyside, a Vancouver-born UBC alumni and the founder of the investment counselling firm John S, Keenlyside & Co. The fonds have more than 300 items consisting of legal documents in the 19th century and documents related to the British Columbia Provincial Police force and various Japanese-Canadian and civil rights groups.

British Columbia Small Debts Act, 1859

Rules and Regulation for the Working of Gold Mines. Issued in conformity with the Gold Fields Act, 1859. Whereas, it is provided by the Gold Fields Act, 1859, that the Governor, for the time being, of British Columbia, may, by writing under his hand and the Public Seal of the Colony, make Rules and Regulations in the nature of by-laws, for all matters relating to Mining. …, 1859-09-07.


B.C. Provincial Police Port Essington Office fonds

The fonds consists of incoming letters to Constable Alexander Forsythe regarding fishing licenses and other matters as well as his report on the spawning grounds at Babine Lake and other locations.

Wallace Brothers Packing Company Limited. [Wallace Fisheries to A. Forsyth, regarding : 1911 licences], 1911-05-12.

Gay, Herbert L. [Handwritten list of unknown person’s effects], 1911-06-14.


R.L. Reid fonds

Robie Lewis Reid (1866-1945), a lawyer and historian, donated his Canadian collection to UBC, where he served as a member of the Board of Governors and the solicitor. Open Collections published around 15 items including correspondences, legislative proceedings, essays and contracts, legal works, and advertisements.


McLeary, J. D. [Commission prepared by McLeary, J. D., British Columbia Provincial Secretary, for A. Henderson, appointed under the Public Inquiries Act to conduct inquiries into the coal mining industry], [1921-03-02].

Smith, John F. Province of British Columbia : Indian Agencies, 1923-05-19.


Charles Semlin fonds

Charles Augustus Semlin (1836-1927) was the Premier of British Columbia between 1898 and 1900. The fonds includes his outgoing letters as the Premier, financial records, correspondence and other material relating to the Dominion Ranch, Semlin and Stuart and the Interior Stock Raisers’ Association, and we have digitized more than 50 items.

Correspondence between Lieutenant Governor McInnes and Honourable C. Semlin, Premier, in respect to the Dismissal of the Semlin Government, 1900-02.

Semlin, C.A. [Dominion Ranch : Financial records, receipts and purchase orders], 1881-1917.


G. Vernon Wellburn British Columbia History Collection

The collection was donated by G. Vernon Wellburn in 2011. He was a former lecturer in forest harvesting in the Faculty of Forestry at UBC. His collection consists of four items: a letter, telegram, a document, and an invitation.

British Columbia Legislative Assembly. [Invitation to the Mr. R. E. Barkley family to attend the opening of the New Parliament Buildings in Victoria, British Columbia, February 10, 1898], 1898.


Education Library Historical Textbooks

Education Library houses historical textbooks used in Canada, and we have digitized 20 of them between 1895 and 1930.

Clement, W. H. P. History of Canada, [1895].

Spilhaus, Margaret Whiting. South African nursery rhymes, [1924].

If you enjoyed this post, please visit BC Historical Documents Collection and explore the history of BC. Happy British Columbia Day!

References

 

Education Library hours for July & August 2019

http://hours.library.ubc.ca/#view-education

Archivist

UBC Library, Vancouver Campus

Full-time, One-Year Term

Anticipated Start Date: September 1, 2019

 UBC Library

The University of British Columbia Library is one of the largest academic libraries in Canada providing access to a collection of over 7M items. UBC Library has 14 branches and divisions on two campuses (Vancouver and Kelowna), including one off-site hospital library and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre – a multi-purpose teaching and learning facility.

More than 300 knowledgeable employees – librarians, management and professional staff, support staff and student staff – provide users with the excellent resources and services that they need to further their research, teaching and learning.  The UBC Library Strategic Plan can be viewed here. To learn more about working with UBC Library and to explore our aspirational values visit UBC Library – Why work with us.

Summary of Responsibility:

The University Archives serves as the central repository for recorded data in all formats created by, for, and about the University of British Columbia. The Archives’ mandate is to identify, select, preserve and make available for use the University’s permanently valuable records.  Working with the Acting University Archivist, the Term Archivist is responsible for the organization and description of materials in the Archives’ holdings, disseminates information about the value and uses of the archival records in the administration of the University and to historical research, and participates in other records-related activities as appropriate.  The Term Archivist supervises staff and student workers as required; participates in library and campus committees, professional organizations, and the University community; and provides general reference services.

Required Qualifications:

A Graduate Degree in Archival Studies (MAS), or equivalent from an accredited school of Library, Archival and Information Science.  Experience working with archival material in all formats including born digital and digitized documents.  Excellent ability to speak, read and write English.  Experience with computer technology and software, particularly library and archival management systems.  The ability to work in a collaborative team environment and engage with professional and library assistant staff and the public is required.  Works to build a team environment built on positive working relationships, provides guidance and resources to teams while trusting them to excel.

Preferred Qualifications:

A second degree in History is desirable. Previous experience working in an archives or library special collections environment would be an asset.  A strong interest in and demonstrated broad knowledge of B.C. and Canadian history and current affairs would be an asset.

Working Relationships:

Reports to the Acting University Archivist.  Works closely with other professionals and support staff in the Archives and the Library.

Duties:

In conjunction with the University Archivist and Archives’ staff, the Term Archivist is responsible for the development and delivery of archival services. More specifically, the responsibilities of the Archivist include: 

  • Identification, acquisition, appraisal, arrangement and description, preservation of, and access to the University’s permanently valuable records in all formats including electronic records.
  • Negotiation for the acquisition of private papers of faculty members and administrators, research collections, and the records of other organizations closely affiliated with the University.
  • Assisting in the formulation and implementation of programs for the creation of digital archives and associated metadata.
  • Supervision of library assistants, Work Learn and other student assistants, and project contractors carrying out specific work on archival collections.
  • Liaison and co-operation with other Archives or Library staff on projects and issues of mutual interest.
  • Overseeing the creation and maintenance of finding aids conforming to evolving national and international standards for all material held in the University Archives.
  • Providing general reference service for the Archives.
  • Promoting the value of archival of archival holdings and services by means of publicity, publications and exhibitions.
  • Performs other duties as necessary, including participating in Library committees, professional initiatives, and University initiatives.

Standards of Performance:

Provides competent professional service to users in a courteous manner. Is aware of developments at the University and in the Library. Maintains a good relationship with administrators, faculty, staff and students.  Keeps current with developments in the fields of archival science and records management and maintains contact with other professionals in the field through archival and records management associations and meetings.

Terms of Appointment and Salary:

This position is a full-time, term appointment for one year.

We are seeking applications from Archivists with up to 3 years of experience.  However, all internal candidates will be considered regardless of years of experience and are encouraged to apply. Salary will be commensurate with experience and academic/professional qualifications.

Applications will include: a detailed and current curriculum vitae; and a letter of application that includes a statement of citizenship/immigration status and indicates the candidate’s education, training and work experience in the areas listed above.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

To view the complete job description and to submit an application, please visit the UBC Careers page by midnight on August 29, 2019.

 

 

 

Xwi7xwa Library Spotlight Series presents: Resources on Sacred Sites

    

Sacred sites are locations that have been set aside from the places we encounter in our everyday lives and generally fall within two general categories: built structures or natural places. They have been set aside because they are deemed to have a spiritual or religious purpose and sacred meaning within a cultural context. These places may be associated with sacred stories, ceremonies, rituals and practices.”

(from Sacred Sites International Foundation)

 

 

Xwi7xwa Library has curated a short list of titles that relate to Indigenous sacred sites. For more information on sacred sites see Indigenous Corporate Training’s article and Sacred Sites International Foundation.

 

 

 Indigenous Earth: Praxis and Transformation edited by Ellen Simmons

Indigenous Earth: Praxis and Transformation, is a collection of essays that bring together voices from a diverse range of academics and practitioners in environmental and social concerns. Topics vary in range from practice in conservation biology to sustainable natural resource management as well as research and development of theory ranging from Indigenousenvironmental ethics to critical issues in cultural heritage and intellectual property. Contributing essays include voices from Peru, Bolivia, Philippines, Norway, United States, and Canada. To preserve the integrity of the variety of disciplines of the contributors, the editor decided to maintain the variety of styles featured in the separate essays.

Find me at UBC Library!

Is the Sacred for Sale? Tourism and Indigenous Peoples by Alison M. Johnston

Is the Sacred for Sale? looks at our present crossroads in consumer society. It analyses the big questions of tourism, clarifying how tourism can support biodiversity conservation. It also offers a cross-cultural window to the divide between corporate thinking and sacred knowledge, to help us understand why collisions over resources and land use are escalating. Finally, we have a full spectrum of information for healthy dialogue and new relationships.

Find me at UBC Library!

 

Recovering the Sacred: the Power of Naming and Claiming by Winona LaDuke

When she invites us to “recover the sacred,” Winona LaDuke is requesting far more than the rescue of ancient bones and beaded headbands from museums. For LaDuke, only the power to define what is sacred-and gain access to it-will enable Indigenous communities to remember who they are and fashion their future.Based on a wealth of research and hundreds of interviews with Indigenous scholars and activists, LaDuke’s book examines the connections between sacred sites, sacred objects, and the sacred bodies of her people, focusing on the conditions under which traditional beliefs can best be practiced. Describing the numerous gaps between mainstream and Indigenous thinking, she probes the paradoxes that abound for peoples of the Americas and points a way forward for Indigenous people and their allies.

Find me at UBC Library!

 

Sacred Objects and Sacred Places: Preserving Tribal Traditions by Andrew Gulliford

Combines Indigenous oral histories, photographs, drawings and case studies to present current issues of cultural preservation vital to Indigenous people such as the repatriation of human remains, the curation and exhibitions of sacred masks and medicine bundles, and protecting sacred places on private, state, and public land.

Find me at UBC Library!

 

Unsettling the Commons: Social Movements Within, Against, and Beyond Settler Colonialism by Craig Fortier

Drawing on interviews with 51 anti-authoritarian organizers to investigate what it means to struggle for “the commons” within a settler colonial context, Unsettling the Commons interrogates a very important debate that took place within Occupy camps and is taking place in a multitude of movements in North America around what it means to claim “the commons” on stolen land. Travelling back in history to show the ways in which radical left movements have often either erased or come into clear conflict with Indigenous practices of sovereignty and self-determination–all in the name of the “struggle for the commons,” the book argues that there are multiple commons or conceptualizations of how land, relationships, and resources are shared, produced, consumed, and distributed in any given society. As opposed to the liberal politics of recognition, a political practice of unsettling and a recognition of the incommensurability of political goals that claim access to space/territory on stolen land is put forward as a more desirable way forward.

Find me at UBC Library!

 

Questions, concerns, or comments? Send us your feedback here!

 

Xwi7xwa would like to thank Elena Pederson, Publications & Web Services Assistant, from UBC Education Library for her work on designing our digital signage.

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K94 .B67 2019
Deborah L. Borman, A Short & Happy Guide to Legal Writing (St. Paul: West Academic Publishing, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K260 .C364 2004
Canadian Council on International Law. Annual Conference, Legitimacy and Accountability in International Law: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Canadian Council on International Law, Ottawa, October 14-16, 2004, Volume 33 (Ottawa: Canadian Council on International Law, 2005).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE416.A78 A3 2019
Harry W. Arthurs, Connecting the Dots: The Life of an Academic Lawyer (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press & Toronto: The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History, 2019).
Online access: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=9862389

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K3165 .A87 2016
Tom Ginsburg & Aziz Z. Huq, eds., Assessing Constitutional Performance (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016).
Online access: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=8480259

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE3365 .K45 2019
Norm Keith, Workplace Health and Safety Crimes, 4th ed. (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE3619 .D64 2019
Meinhard Doelle & Chris Tollefson, Environmental Law: Cases and Materials, 3rd ed. (Toronto: Thomson Reuters Canada, 2019.

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE5325 .G68 2019
Amanda Wakaruk & Sam-chin Li, eds., Government Information in Canada: Access and Stewardship (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF250 .W9 2019
Richard C. Wydick & Amy E. Sloan, Plain English for Lawyers, 6th ed. (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2019)

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KJE2188 .S478 2019
Lodewijk van Setten, The Law of Financial Advice, Investment Management, and Trading (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KJE6246 .W55 2019
Ulrike Will, Climate Border Adjustments and WTO Law: Extending the EU Emissions Trading System to Imported Goods and Services (Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KNQ448.P65 S47 2016
Samuli Seppänen, Ideological Conflict and the Rule of Law in Contemporary China: Useful Paradoxes (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016).

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