Whether you are in the thinking stages of starting a business or are looking for opportunities to expand your business network, there are plenty of interesting events taking place during the month of August. 

We also recommend visiting smallbusinessbc.ca and reviewing their full event calendar and seminar line up. Please note details are accurate at time of publication, all summaries have been reproduced from host descriptions.

Photo Credit: Photo by rawpixel


Supplying Professional Services to the Government of Canada
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring and current professional service providers
Date: August 1
Time: 10:30am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Learn how to register your business in the Centralized Professional Services System (CPSS) as well as how to find and bid on professional service opportunities.


Business Loan Information Session
Host: Women’s Enterprise Centre
Target audience: Aspiring women entrepreneurs
Date: August 6
Time: 12pm – 1pm
Location: Phone-in
Cost: Free
Register
Summary: A facilitator will provide guidance on how to apply for a loan from the Women’s Enterprise Centre.


Focused Business Planning
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 6-28
Time: See registration page for the start times of each seminar
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $419
Register
Summary: A package of nine seminars designed to help you evaluate the viability of your business idea, potential buyers of your product or service and more! Each seminar can also be booked individually.


Starting Your Business: What’s the Plan?
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 6
Time: 9am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $59
Register
Summary: Identify key gaps in your business plan as well as how to create a cohesive, compelling argument for your business.

 


Burnaby Entrepreneurs Toastmasters
Host: Burnaby Entrepreneurs Toastmasters
Target audience: Entrepreneurs
Date: Wednesday (Recurring)
Time: 6:45pm
Location: CMPNY Burnaby
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Improve your public speaking skills and leadership qualities in this friendly, constructive environment.


Business Mapping: Developing a Smart Business Model
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs
Date: August 7
Time: 1pm – 3pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $59      
Register
Summary: Learn how to evaluate your business idea, understand the key areas of a successful business model, and discover financing options for your new venture. 


Need to Know: Mindset Mastery for Business Growth
Host: Hervana Coworking Collective
Target audience: Women entrepreneurs and business owners
Date: August 9
Time: 9:30 am – 12:30pm
Location: Hervana Coworking Collective
Cost: $79-$99
Register
Summary: A workshop designed for women entrepreneurs to help them unleash their entrepreneurial mindsets and grow their businesses successfully.


Business Viability 1: The Break Even Analysis
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs; Small business owners
Date: August 13
Time: 9am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69
Register
Summary: Learn how to identify the costs of starting and operating a business in its first year. Discover how to calculate starting capital and annual sales to break even.


Business Viability 2: The Cash Flow Forecast
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs; Small business owners
Date: August 13
Time: 1pm – 4pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69      
Register
Summary: Learn how to forecast monthly cash flow, how to calculate cash flow, and the causes of cash flow problems.


Mastering Your Business for Maximum Profit & Success in Surrey
Host: Canadian Business Success Events
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 13
Time: 12pm – 2pm
Location: Sheraton Guildford Hotel
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Overcome your own fears of starting a business in this 2-hour event designed to help you maximize growth, sales, and profit.


How to Set Up a Business for Newcomers
Host: Burnaby Public Library
Co-host: MOSAIC
Target audience: Newcomers
Date: August 16
Time: 6pm – 8pm
Location: Burnaby Public Library
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Intended for newcomers who want to learn the process of starting a small business, including how to write a business plan, register a business, and find financing.


Mastering Social Media to Grow Your Business
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs; Small business owners
Date: August 19
Time: 1pm – 4:30pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $39
Register
Summary: Learn how to expand your following by incorporating social media into your marketing strategy.


Market Research 1: Finding Data That Works for You
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 20
Time: 9:30am – 3:30pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69      
Register
Summary: Discover how to use secondary data — including what it is and where to find it — to analyze your target market, competitors, and industry trends in this seminar that explores the importance of secondary market research.


Business Planning (Penticton, BC)
Host: Community Futures Okanagan Similkameen
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and business owners
Date: August 21
Time: 9am – 4pm
Location: Community Futures Okanagan Similkameen
Cost: $75
Register
Summary: Learn how to develop an action plan to help make your business model a reality!


Starting a Business Information Session
Host: Women’s Enterprise Centre
Target audience: Aspiring women entrepreneurs
Date: August 22
Time: 12pm – 1pm
Location: Phone-in
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Receive guidance on several topics including business structures, registering a business, licenses and permits, and sources of funding for a business.


Creating Your First Business Website
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Small business owners
Date: August 26
Time: 1pm – 3pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $59
Register
Summary: This interactive step-by-step tour of WordPress will provide you with a foundation to build and customize a website for your business.


Market Research 2: Surveys and Focus Groups for Knowing Your Customer
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 27
Time: 9:30am – 3:30pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69      
Register
Summary: Learn about the difference between quantitative and qualitative data, discover methods for collecting data, and understand the key tools for gathering information in this seminar that explores the importance of primary market research.


Operations for Small Business
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring small business owners
Date: August 28
Time: 9am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $39
Register
Summary: Discover how to plan, set up, and manage small business operations, as well as how to set goals and targets within your team.

Events

Whether you are in the thinking stages of starting a business or are looking for opportunities to expand your business network, there are plenty of interesting events taking place during the month of August. 

We also recommend visiting smallbusinessbc.ca and reviewing their full event calendar and seminar line up. Please note details are accurate at time of publication, all summaries have been reproduced from host descriptions.

Photo Credit: Photo by rawpixel


Supplying Professional Services to the Government of Canada
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring and current professional service providers
Date: August 1
Time: 10:30am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Learn how to register your business in the Centralized Professional Services System (CPSS) as well as how to find and bid on professional service opportunities.


Business Loan Information Session
Host: Women’s Enterprise Centre
Target audience: Aspiring women entrepreneurs
Date: August 6
Time: 12pm – 1pm
Location: Phone-in
Cost: Free
Register
Summary: A facilitator will provide guidance on how to apply for a loan from the Women’s Enterprise Centre.


Focused Business Planning
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 6-28
Time: See registration page for the start times of each seminar
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $419
Register
Summary: A package of nine seminars designed to help you evaluate the viability of your business idea, potential buyers of your product or service and more! Each seminar can also be booked individually.


Starting Your Business: What’s the Plan?
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 6
Time: 9am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $59
Register
Summary: Identify key gaps in your business plan as well as how to create a cohesive, compelling argument for your business.

 


Burnaby Entrepreneurs Toastmasters
Host: Burnaby Entrepreneurs Toastmasters
Target audience: Entrepreneurs
Date: Wednesday (Recurring)
Time: 6:45pm
Location: CMPNY Burnaby
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Improve your public speaking skills and leadership qualities in this friendly, constructive environment.


Business Mapping: Developing a Smart Business Model
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs
Date: August 7
Time: 1pm – 3pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $59      
Register
Summary: Learn how to evaluate your business idea, understand the key areas of a successful business model, and discover financing options for your new venture. 


Need to Know: Mindset Mastery for Business Growth
Host: Hervana Coworking Collective
Target audience: Women entrepreneurs and business owners
Date: August 9
Time: 9:30 am – 12:30pm
Location: Hervana Coworking Collective
Cost: $79-$99
Register
Summary: A workshop designed for women entrepreneurs to help them unleash their entrepreneurial mindsets and grow their businesses successfully.


Business Viability 1: The Break Even Analysis
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs; Small business owners
Date: August 13
Time: 9am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69
Register
Summary: Learn how to identify the costs of starting and operating a business in its first year. Discover how to calculate starting capital and annual sales to break even.


Business Viability 2: The Cash Flow Forecast
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs; Small business owners
Date: August 13
Time: 1pm – 4pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69      
Register
Summary: Learn how to forecast monthly cash flow, how to calculate cash flow, and the causes of cash flow problems.


Mastering Your Business for Maximum Profit & Success in Surrey
Host: Canadian Business Success Events
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 13
Time: 12pm – 2pm
Location: Sheraton Guildford Hotel
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Overcome your own fears of starting a business in this 2-hour event designed to help you maximize growth, sales, and profit.


How to Set Up a Business for Newcomers
Host: Burnaby Public Library
Co-host: MOSAIC
Target audience: Newcomers
Date: August 16
Time: 6pm – 8pm
Location: Burnaby Public Library
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Intended for newcomers who want to learn the process of starting a small business, including how to write a business plan, register a business, and find financing.


Mastering Social Media to Grow Your Business
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Entrepreneurs; Small business owners
Date: August 19
Time: 1pm – 4:30pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $39
Register
Summary: Learn how to expand your following by incorporating social media into your marketing strategy.


Market Research 1: Finding Data That Works for You
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 20
Time: 9:30am – 3:30pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69      
Register
Summary: Discover how to use secondary data — including what it is and where to find it — to analyze your target market, competitors, and industry trends in this seminar that explores the importance of secondary market research.


Business Planning (Penticton, BC)
Host: Community Futures Okanagan Similkameen
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and business owners
Date: August 21
Time: 9am – 4pm
Location: Community Futures Okanagan Similkameen
Cost: $75
Register
Summary: Learn how to develop an action plan to help make your business model a reality!


Starting a Business Information Session
Host: Women’s Enterprise Centre
Target audience: Aspiring women entrepreneurs
Date: August 22
Time: 12pm – 1pm
Location: Phone-in
Cost: FREE
Register
Summary: Receive guidance on several topics including business structures, registering a business, licenses and permits, and sources of funding for a business.


Creating Your First Business Website
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Small business owners
Date: August 26
Time: 1pm – 3pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $59
Register
Summary: This interactive step-by-step tour of WordPress will provide you with a foundation to build and customize a website for your business.


Market Research 2: Surveys and Focus Groups for Knowing Your Customer
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners
Date: August 27
Time: 9:30am – 3:30pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $69      
Register
Summary: Learn about the difference between quantitative and qualitative data, discover methods for collecting data, and understand the key tools for gathering information in this seminar that explores the importance of primary market research.


Operations for Small Business
Host: Small Business BC
Target audience: Aspiring small business owners
Date: August 28
Time: 9am – 12pm
Location: Small Business BC – Vancouver (Available to other locations via Webinar)
Cost: $39
Register
Summary: Discover how to plan, set up, and manage small business operations, as well as how to set goals and targets within your team.

Events

Photo credit Robert Abel.

Librarians seem to be making a name for themselves on Jeopardy! these days and here at UBC Library, we’re proud to count one of our own among them. Dr. Jennifer Abel, who is currently earning her MLIS and working as a student librarian in the Education Library, recently appeared on Jeopardy! on July 17. We caught up with Jennifer to learn about her Jeopardy! experience and what she values most about UBC Library.

What does the process of applying for Jeopardy! look like?

The first thing you have to do is do an online test. They host them a couple of times a year. It’s a 15-minute timed online test of 50 questions. They don’t tell you how you do. You only find out if you did okay on the test if you get called for an in-person audition.  I did the online test twice, once in the fall of 2016 and once in the spring of 2017. I was called in for an in-person audition in February 2018.

At the in-person audition, you take another written test and then they hold some mock games where you practice with the signalling device and answering in the form of a question. They record a short interview as well to get a feel for your personability. Once that’s complete, you’re in the contest pool for 18 months. You may or may not get called and I was lucky enough to get called.

What was it like once you got to set?

All the filming is down in Culver City, California at the Sony Pictures Entertainment studios. They tape five shows in one day, so basically, a week of shows. Having watched the show basically my entire life, I was sort of used to seeing the sets and the big board. But it’s different when you’re actually there. You’re on the stage going “Wow, this is bigger than I thought!”

Photo credit: Jeopardy! Productions Inc.

What was meeting Alex Trebek like?

He seemed very much like his professional show persona. I think he’s the most gentlemanly game show host I’ve ever seen, which I think is part of being Canadian. In between the shows, he takes questions from the audience — he’s very quietly funny. Apparently, he’s also a handyman — not that he does that on the set, but he showed us a picture of himself up to his waist in his wife’s bathroom floor because he was renovating the bathroom. It made me think, you can take the boy out of Sudbury but you can’t take the Sudbury out of the boy!

Librarians and librarians-in-training seem to be doing very well on Jeopardy! recently. Why do you think that is?

I think librarians in particular are very curious — they’re interested in lots of different things. They generally have a good memory, because we have to remember where all the stuff is! One of the things we learn in library school is asking the right questions when we’re conducting reference interviews with faculty and researchers. I think that skill really comes in handy in Jeopardy!.

As a former PhD student in Linguistics and current MLIS student, what do you value the most about UBC Library?

I think the people are great and their expertise is so helpful. The librarians I worked with during grad school are the reason that I wanted to go to library school. I admire their willingness to try new things and their work to make the university a better place. I think of the work I got to do with the Research Commons and just how much of a difference that’s made in the lives of so many UBC grad students.  That support wouldn’t exist if it hadn’t been for folks in the library.

Jennifer Abel worked as a Graduate Student Peer for Thesis and Dissertation Support at UBC Library’s Research Commons from July 2012 to April 2015 and September 2017 to August 2018, where she taught workshops and offered one-on-one consults.

She completed her PhD in Linguistics at UBC and is now working towards earning her MLIS.

 

 

   

 

 

News Release from Research Data Alliance (RDA): 

 

The Research Data Alliance (RDA) and the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) are pleased to announce an agreement to work together to strengthen and expand capacities for research data management within the international data repository community.

COAR and RDA have a shared mission to improve access and use of research outputs, leading to better research and new discoveries. As part of this agreement, the organizations intend to coordinate more closely on strategic initiatives of shared interest, regularly exchange information about activities, and conduct joint webinars and events to support common aims.

 

Read the full press release

 

About Research Data Management (RDM) at UBC

 

Explore RDM items in Open Collections

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible via cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, we have historic photographs depicting street scenery in Vancouver in the early 1900s. This post will explore some of our favourite photographs, showing the major streets in Vancouver. We hope you can identify where the pictures were taken and how the streets have changed since then!

Granville street

Granville St., Vancouver, B.C. [between 1904 and 1907?]

Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C. [between 1920 and 1930?].

Granville St., Vancouver. [between 1924 and 1949?]

 

Hastings Street

Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C., [not after 1910]

Barrowclough, George Alfred. Hasting St., Vancouver, B.C., [between 1910 and 1920?]

Hastings Street Looking East, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1940 and 1960?]

 

Georgia Street

Georgia Street, Vancouver, [between 1914 and 1939].

United Fishers and Allied Workers May Day parade on Georgia Street, Vancouver, 1947.

Georgia St. W., Vancouver, B.C., [between 1924 and 1949?].

Robson Street

Barrowclough, George Alfred. Manhattan Apartments, Robson St., Vancouver, B.C., 1907.

Davie Street

[View of a trolley car on Davie Street, Vancouver], [between 1900 and 1910?].

Burrard Street

Aero Surveys Photo. Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1940 and 1950?]

Cambie Street

B.C. Photo Card Co. Cambie St, Vancouver, 1915.

 

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, we also have photographs and postcards of streets from other cities (e.g., New Westminster, Fernie, and Chilliwack). The following is useful subject headings to search:

 

We hope you enjoyed this post. To view more historic photographs, please visit our Open Collections.

 

[July 29th update: We removed one photo which was not from Downtown Vancouver.]

Program Assistant, Chapman Learning Commons

Background

Kelsi joined the Chapman Learning Commons team in June 2019. Kelsi graduated in 2012 from UBC with a B.A., majoring in English and minoring in psychology. In 2016 she obtained her library technician diploma from Langara College. Prior to joining the team Kelsi worked as a circulation clerk at Burnaby Public Library. Having worked in both public and academic libraries, she is pleased to be back in an academic setting as part of the Learning Commons team.

Current Roles and Responsibilities

In her current role, Kelsi is responsible for processing, cataloguing, and maintaining all equipment loaned out by the Chapman Learning Commons desk. Kelsi helps to uphold office organization by inventorying all equipment and supplies on an ongoing maintenance, as well as ordering supplies when needed. She also assists with the hiring, onboarding, and training of student staff.

Contact

Phone: 604 827 5949
Email: kelsi.proulx@ubc.ca

UBC Library has partnered with local non-profit 2 Paycheques Away to bring an exceptional and striking photography exhibit to two library locations.

This industry overview will discuss the latest statistics and trends for the management consulting industry in Canada. For more information on the consulting industry please see our Consulting Industry Guide.

Photo Credit: Photo by Free-Photos

Key Takeaways

  • Steady growth: The number of consulting firms grew every year during 2013-2018. This is expected to continue through 2018-2023.
  • New entrants: High industry profitability will incentive new entrants into the market during 2018-2023. Many of these new entrants will serve niche industries.
  • Steady competition: Competition is expected to remain steady during 2018-2023, with the main sources of competition coming from the IT consulting industry and in-house service.
  • Stable demand: Strong domestic economic conditions are expected to result in stable demand for industry services during 2018-2023.

Industry Performance Snapshot

The Management, Scientific and Technical Services Consulting sector [5416] achieved operating revenues and operating expenses of $21.3 billion and $15.3 billion respectively in 2016. (Statistics Canada, Consulting Services, Summary Statistics, n.d.).

Source: Statistics Canada. Consulting Services, Breakdown of Sales. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310016201

Products and Services

The chart above shows that management consulting services accounted for the largest portion of consulting sales in 2017. The following is a breakdown of the management consulting services provided that year (Statistics Canada, Consulting Services, Breakdown of Sales, n.d.):

  • Strategic management consulting services (20.8%)
  • Financial management consulting services (10.6%)
  • Marketing management consulting services (5.5%)
  • Human resources management consulting services (12.0%)
  • Operations and supply chain management consulting services (4.2%)
  • Other management consulting services (18.5%)

Key Markets

In 2017, most sales were made to domestic businesses (67.8%), followed by sales to governments, not-for-profit organizations and public institutions (13.3%) and sales to international clients (13.3%).

Source: Statistics Canada. Consulting Services, Sales by Type of Client. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016801

Cost Breakdown

The Top 5 industry expenses in 2017 were (Statistics Canada, Consulting Services, Industry Expenditures, n.d):

  • Salaries, wages, commissions, and benefits (43.2%)
  • Subcontracts (9.2%)
  • Professional and business fees (7.4%)
  • Cost of goods sold (6.4%)
  • All other costs and expenses (9.9%)

Business Locations

Source: Statistics Canada. Establishments by Employment Type and Province/Territory. Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/5416

Trends & Changes

Market Growth

  • During 2018-2023, government expenditure is forecast to grow at an annualized rate of 1.7%. This will create more opportunities for management consultants who specializing in advising public agencies (Ismailanji, 2018)
  • Financial services will be a key driver of industry demand during 2018-2023. Management consultants will benefit as a result of Canadian banks and firms seeking their services (Ismailanji, 2018).

Steady Competition

  • During 2018-2023, more specialized consulting firms will enter the market and provide services to niche industries (Ismailanji, 2018).
  • High industry profitability will lead to more competition, with the total number of enterprises reaching 87,390 by 2023 (Ismailanji, 2018).

Shifting Business Environment

  • During 2018-2023, foreign investment is expected to slow as a result of the US Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (Ismailanji, 2018).
  • Corporate profit and the number of businesses in management consulting are forecasted to increase at annualized rates of 4.8% and 0.7% respectively, creating strong demand for industry services (Ismailanji, 2018).

Growth of the Gig Economy

  • The gig economy (characterized by temporary or contracted employment on an on demand basis) is growing rapidly in Canada (BMO, 2018).
  • Large corporations are hiring more consultants and highly skilled specialists to supplement their permanent staff (BMO, 2018).
  • In September 2017, there were 2.8 million Canadians classified as temporary workers (BMO, 2018). This figure includes management consultants.
  • Millennials are more attracted to the gig economy than other age groups because they are looking for ways to supplement their income (BMO, 2018).

Other Trends

  • Management consultants are developing niche proficiencies and more dynamic skill sets. Being a generalist is less common (CMC, 2016).
  • Big data continues to create new opportunities in information usage, governance, data security, and privacy and information systems (CMC, 2016).
  • Clients are demanding value-based solutions and proof of cost savings. They also expect to be mentored and coached by their consultants (CMC, 2016).

Snapshot of British Columbia

  • Largest age group of consultants were 45-64 (50%), followed by 25-44 (39%), 65+ (9%), and 15-24 (2%) (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • 74.7% of all management consultants worked in the Mainland/Southwest regions of BC (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • Annual median salary of consultants was $75,082 in 2017 (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • Provincial hourly wage rate (WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile, 2018):
    • High: $51.43
    • Median: $36
    • Low: $20
  • 530 management consulting jobs opened in 2018 (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • 4233 people are currently employed in this sector (WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile, 2018).
  • 2126 new job openings are forecasted for 2018-2028, with annual forecasted replacement rates of 2.7% (WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile, 2018).

Sources

BMO Wealth Management. (2018). The Gig Economy. Retrieved from: https://www.bmo.com/assets/pdfs/wealth/bmo_gig_economy_report_en.pdf

CMC Canada. (2016). Management Consulting in Canada: 2016 Industry Report – Executive Summary. Retrieved from:

https://higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/CMCCANADA/6ae61369-ed65-4d46-87b4-976096e78fa2/UploadedImages/Executive%20Summary%20-%202016%20Industry%20Study.pdf

Ismailanji, M. (2018). IBISWorld Industry Report 54161CA: Management Consulting in Canada. Retrieved from IBISWorld Industry Reports database.

Statistics Canada. (n.d). Consulting Services, Breakdown of Sales. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310016201

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Consulting Services, Industry Expenditures. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016701

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Consulting Services, Sales by Type of Client. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016801

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Consulting Services, Summary Statistics. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016601

WorkBC. (2018). WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile: Management, Scientific and Technical Consulting Services (NAICS 5416). Retrieved from: https://www.workbc.ca/getmedia/13b75e6f-8609-4e28-a965-eac561743fc3/profile-5416-management,-scientific-and-technical-consulting-services.pdf.aspx

WorkBC. (n.d.). Professional Occupations in Business Management Consulting (NOC 1122). Retrieved from: https://www.workbc.ca/jobs-careers/explore-careers/browse-career-profile/112

Industry Trends

This industry overview will discuss the latest statistics and trends for the management consulting industry in Canada. For more information on the consulting industry please see our Consulting Industry Guide.

Photo Credit: Photo by Free-Photos

Key Takeaways

  • Steady growth: The number of consulting firms grew every year during 2013-2018. This is expected to continue through 2018-2023.
  • New entrants: High industry profitability will incentive new entrants into the market during 2018-2023. Many of these new entrants will serve niche industries.
  • Steady competition: Competition is expected to remain steady during 2018-2023, with the main sources of competition coming from the IT consulting industry and in-house service.
  • Stable demand: Strong domestic economic conditions are expected to result in stable demand for industry services during 2018-2023.

Industry Performance Snapshot

The Management, Scientific and Technical Services Consulting sector [5416] achieved operating revenues and operating expenses of $21.3 billion and $15.3 billion respectively in 2016. (Statistics Canada, Consulting Services, Summary Statistics, n.d.).

Source: Statistics Canada. Consulting Services, Breakdown of Sales. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310016201

Products and Services

The chart above shows that management consulting services accounted for the largest portion of consulting sales in 2017. The following is a breakdown of the management consulting services provided that year (Statistics Canada, Consulting Services, Breakdown of Sales, n.d.):

  • Strategic management consulting services (20.8%)
  • Financial management consulting services (10.6%)
  • Marketing management consulting services (5.5%)
  • Human resources management consulting services (12.0%)
  • Operations and supply chain management consulting services (4.2%)
  • Other management consulting services (18.5%)

Key Markets

In 2017, most sales were made to domestic businesses (67.8%), followed by sales to governments, not-for-profit organizations and public institutions (13.3%) and sales to international clients (13.3%).

Source: Statistics Canada. Consulting Services, Sales by Type of Client. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016801

Cost Breakdown

The Top 5 industry expenses in 2017 were (Statistics Canada, Consulting Services, Industry Expenditures, n.d):

  • Salaries, wages, commissions, and benefits (43.2%)
  • Subcontracts (9.2%)
  • Professional and business fees (7.4%)
  • Cost of goods sold (6.4%)
  • All other costs and expenses (9.9%)

Business Locations

Source: Statistics Canada. Establishments by Employment Type and Province/Territory. Retrieved from: https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/app/cis/businesses-entreprises/5416

Trends & Changes

Market Growth

  • During 2018-2023, government expenditure is forecast to grow at an annualized rate of 1.7%. This will create more opportunities for management consultants who specializing in advising public agencies (Ismailanji, 2018)
  • Financial services will be a key driver of industry demand during 2018-2023. Management consultants will benefit as a result of Canadian banks and firms seeking their services (Ismailanji, 2018).

Steady Competition

  • During 2018-2023, more specialized consulting firms will enter the market and provide services to niche industries (Ismailanji, 2018).
  • High industry profitability will lead to more competition, with the total number of enterprises reaching 87,390 by 2023 (Ismailanji, 2018).

Shifting Business Environment

  • During 2018-2023, foreign investment is expected to slow as a result of the US Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (Ismailanji, 2018).
  • Corporate profit and the number of businesses in management consulting are forecasted to increase at annualized rates of 4.8% and 0.7% respectively, creating strong demand for industry services (Ismailanji, 2018).

Growth of the Gig Economy

  • The gig economy (characterized by temporary or contracted employment on an on demand basis) is growing rapidly in Canada (BMO, 2018).
  • Large corporations are hiring more consultants and highly skilled specialists to supplement their permanent staff (BMO, 2018).
  • In September 2017, there were 2.8 million Canadians classified as temporary workers (BMO, 2018). This figure includes management consultants.
  • Millennials are more attracted to the gig economy than other age groups because they are looking for ways to supplement their income (BMO, 2018).

Other Trends

  • Management consultants are developing niche proficiencies and more dynamic skill sets. Being a generalist is less common (CMC, 2016).
  • Big data continues to create new opportunities in information usage, governance, data security, and privacy and information systems (CMC, 2016).
  • Clients are demanding value-based solutions and proof of cost savings. They also expect to be mentored and coached by their consultants (CMC, 2016).

Snapshot of British Columbia

  • Largest age group of consultants were 45-64 (50%), followed by 25-44 (39%), 65+ (9%), and 15-24 (2%) (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • 74.7% of all management consultants worked in the Mainland/Southwest regions of BC (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • Annual median salary of consultants was $75,082 in 2017 (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • Provincial hourly wage rate (WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile, 2018):
    • High: $51.43
    • Median: $36
    • Low: $20
  • 530 management consulting jobs opened in 2018 (WorkBC, n.d.).
  • 4233 people are currently employed in this sector (WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile, 2018).
  • 2126 new job openings are forecasted for 2018-2028, with annual forecasted replacement rates of 2.7% (WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile, 2018).

Sources

BMO Wealth Management. (2018). The Gig Economy. Retrieved from: https://www.bmo.com/assets/pdfs/wealth/bmo_gig_economy_report_en.pdf

CMC Canada. (2016). Management Consulting in Canada: 2016 Industry Report – Executive Summary. Retrieved from:

https://higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/CMCCANADA/6ae61369-ed65-4d46-87b4-976096e78fa2/UploadedImages/Executive%20Summary%20-%202016%20Industry%20Study.pdf

Ismailanji, M. (2018). IBISWorld Industry Report 54161CA: Management Consulting in Canada. Retrieved from IBISWorld Industry Reports database.

Statistics Canada. (n.d). Consulting Services, Breakdown of Sales. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3310016201

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Consulting Services, Industry Expenditures. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016701

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Consulting Services, Sales by Type of Client. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016801

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Consulting Services, Summary Statistics. Retrieved from: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2110016601

WorkBC. (2018). WorkBC Industry Outlook Profile: Management, Scientific and Technical Consulting Services (NAICS 5416). Retrieved from: https://www.workbc.ca/getmedia/13b75e6f-8609-4e28-a965-eac561743fc3/profile-5416-management,-scientific-and-technical-consulting-services.pdf.aspx

WorkBC. (n.d.). Professional Occupations in Business Management Consulting (NOC 1122). Retrieved from: https://www.workbc.ca/jobs-careers/explore-careers/browse-career-profile/112

Industry Trends

Historical newspapers are good resources for researching the political, social and cultural trends in local areas during specific historical periods. One of the interesting components are advertisements, which contain information about local businesses, and popular industries around the time. Like today, the papers had designed their advertisements to catch readers’ eyes and attract new customers. From more than 60,000 digitized newspaper issues in Open Collections, this post will introduce our favourite advertisements.

BC Historical Newspapers collection

BC Historical Newspapers collection contains 167 historical newspapers with more than 40,000 issues dated from 1859 to 1995. All of the titles were published in British Columbia.

June 14, 1894: “Horse Sense in a Few Words”

The Advance (Midway Dispatch) was a weekly newspaper published in Midway, BC (Fairview, BC for the first four months) between 1894 and 1904 (The Advance: 1898-1902; The Midway Dispatch: 1902-1904).

This advertisement by Riley & Donald, an agent company in Kelowna, BC for the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company in Chicago, IL, depicts a letter from a horse that complains about how heavy the mower is to pull and suggests that farmers buy McCormick’s lighter product.

The Advance, 1894-06-14.

 

June 10, 1916: “The telephone makes everyone your neighbor.”

The Cumberland Islander (1910-1931) was a weekly newspaper published in Cumberland, BC. We have digitized all 1,094 issues.

British Columbia Telephone Company (BC Tel) advertised its telephone service, which was relatively new at the time, 40 years following Alexander Graham Bell’s invention of the telephone near Brantford, ON in 1876.

Today we have the Internet that makes us feel like “neighbors”, 100 years after the publication of this advertisement!

The Islander, 1916-06-10.

 

September 14, 1911: “Let Mooney Do It”

Chilliwack Free Press was published from September 1911 to October 1912 in Chilliwack, BC.

Mooney Biscuit & Candy Company, based in Stratford, ON, advertises its biscuits. Using the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada running beside its factory, it exported its biscuits and chocolates to other areas of Canada. The advertisement emphasizes its freshness as a ready-made biscuit and appeal to those who do not have spare time for baking biscuits in their kitchen.

Chilliwack Free Press, 1911-09-14.

 

September 27, 1930: “Fall Steamship and Train Services”

The Alice Arm and Anyox Herald was published weekly in Alice Arm, BC between June 1921 and March 1935. We have 707 digitized issues.

The Canadian National Railways and Canadian National Steamship Company advertises both trains and steamship services by effectively using the vertically long rectangle area. Since the bird was flying at the top and ship is sailing at the bottom, the ad area itself looks like a scene in the ocean.

Herald, 1930-09-27.

 

Tairiku Nippo (The Continental News) collection

Tairiku Nippo (The Continental News) was published from 1907 until the day before Pearl Harbor in 1941 for Japanese Canadian communities in BC.

September 24, 1930: Hudson’s Bay Company

The following is the ad of Hudson’s Bay Company written in Japanese and announces its sales items for the upcoming Saturday.

Tairiku Nippo, 1930-09-30.

 

The Ubyssey

The Ubyssey is UBC’s student newspaper that started in October 1918. Until today, it has published the largest student paper in Western Canada, once a week during the school year. Open Collections have digitized more than 5,000 issues with a significant contribution from the Graduating Class 2002/03 as well as additional funding received from the President’s Office, The Ubyssey Publications Society and the UBC Library.

January 30, 1919: “Keep the happy memories of College days for all time.”

Bridgman’s Studio Limited (1915-1948) was a photo shooting studio located in Granville street owned by Archibald Thomas Reed Bridgman. This advertisement from January has a warm message to its audience and advertises its photo shooting services to UBC students.

The Ubyssey, 1919-01-30.

 

If you want to explore more newspaper advertisements, please visit our Open Collections and search our newspaper collections.

 

References

 

See also

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