The new Open UBC site has launched today on Aug 26, Monday morning.

Goals for the site relaunch

There were three goals for the site relaunch. We wanted to:

  • Broaden the site focus by including Open Access and Open Research as major themes of the site, since they are important component of the open scholarship movement.
  • Include and point to resources that are available on other UBC websites.
  • Improve the user experience of the site so that the resources are easily accessible by faculty members, students and staff who are interested in open scholarship.

Process

May 2018 – Usability Testing

poster of open ubc website UX session

Poster of Open UBC Website Review (by Rie Namba, CC by SA 3.0)

On May 22, 2018, we hosted a small usability test event for the Open UBC site. During the usability testing, we asked participants to bring their own device (for ex: laptop, tablet, mobile) and go through the user testing survey provided. Two faculty members, one undergraduate student, one graduate student and one staff participated the usability testing event.

Overall, we found out from the usability testing that:

  • Some users were confused with some of the terminology of the websites (For example: Open Practice).
  • Some users had hard time finding resources due to the structure of the landing pages.

Many users accessed the “Project” (now it is called “Examples”) page to see what their colleagues were creating. Learning from the feedback we received during the usability testing, we aimed to create a new website that is more simple and improves user experience.

Oct 2018 – Card Sorting Activity

card sorting activity

photograph from the Card Sorting Activity (by Rie Namba -CC by SA 3.0)

On Oct 2018, with a small group from the Library and CTLT (Erin Fields, Cindy Underhill, Will Engle, Lucas Wright and Rie Namba), we designed the new architecture for the new Open UBC site, and did a “card sorting activity” to map out existing pages in the Open UBC site to the new architecture. As a result, we had gaps with resources in Research, Data, and Access sections.

March 2019- Sprint

On March 2019, we organized a sprint and invited a group of expertise (Erin Fields, Stephanie Savage, Rie Namba, Will Engle, Leonora Crema, Matthew Vis-Dumbar, Sarah Parker, Alex Kuskowski, Eirian Vining) to create a “Get Started” page for “Research” “Data” and “Access”. The summary of the sprint can be found in the wiki page below:

Open UBC Website Sprint March 2019

March 2019 ~ Aug 26 – Iteration

During this period of time, we worked on an iteration of the new Open UBC site. We asked feedbacks for the new Open UBC site from the Open UBC Working Group , which is a working group that supports emerging and ongoing open projects at UBC and beyond. We then edited the new Open UBC site according to the feedback.

Give us Feedback and Contribute to the Open UBC site

If you are excited about contributing to the Open UBC site, there are various ways that you can contribute to the site:

 

 

 

News Release from CANARIE: 

 

CANARIE, a vital component of Canada’s digital research infrastructure ecosystem supporting research, education and innovation, today announced $2M in funding to support the Canadian Association of Research Libraries’ (CARL) Portage Network. CARL Portage is a national, library-based research data management (RDM) network that fosters initiatives to build capacity and to coordinate activities in research data management.

The ability to manage and reuse research data helps accelerate discovery, allows for reproducibility of scientific results, and maximizes return on investment of research funding. Research data management best practices help ensure the accessibility and protection of data during the research lifecycle and beyond, and help meet growing requirements of research ethics and reproducibility, along with evolving funder policies. This funding broadens the functionality of current Portage services and tools and adds capacity to national RDM resources.

 

Read the full press release

 

Quick facts about CANAIRE:

 

  • 31,000 – Length in KM of CANARIE’s coast-to-coast ultra-high-speed research and education network
  • Nearly 170 – higher education institutions currently participating in the Canadian Access Federation (CAF)
  • 46 – percent by which traffic on the CANARIE network has been growing over the past ten years

 

About Research Data Management (RDM) at UBC

 

Explore RDM tems in Open Collections

 

Want to make your UBC research openly accessible? Visit cIRcle

 

 

UBC Library

The University of British Columbia Library is one of the largest academic libraries in Canada providing access to a collection of over 7M items. UBC Library has 14 branches and divisions on two campuses (Vancouver and Kelowna), including one off-site hospital library and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre – a multi-purpose teaching and learning facility.

More than 300 knowledgeable employees – librarians, management and professional staff, support staff and student staff – provide users with the excellent resources and services that they need to further their research, teaching and learning.  The UBC Library Strategic Plan 2015-2017 can be viewed at http://about.library.ubc.ca/strategic-plan/  To learn more about working with UBC Library and to explore our aspirational values visit UBC Library – Why work with us.

SUMMARY OF RESPONSIBILITY:

The Koerner Library and UBC Library Research Commons provide services and collections to support the research needs of students, faculty and staff, with a focus on the humanities and social sciences in the Koerner Library collections and services, and prioritization for graduate students in the interdisciplinary Research Commons.

The Liaison Librarian provides instruction, information and reference services for faculty, students, staff and community users, and assumes responsibility for designated subject areas and liaison with relevant departments. The librarian develops and maintains collections and learning resources, including online course and subject guides, and other appropriate tools within the designated subject areas. The librarian participates in the planning and implementation of Library services that support the needs of faculty and students. The librarian works cooperatively with other librarians and staff in the unit, in the Research Commons, at the UBC Library, and faculty and staff in the humanities and social sciences, to develop and maintain high quality Library services and collections in all formats. The librarian participates in the development of Library policy, procedures and services. The librarian assumes responsibility for coordination and management of staff, students, services and projects, as required.

Specific subjects and areas of responsibility will include Economics; Journalism; Philosophy; and Political Science. Other subjects may be assigned as required.

WORKING RELATIONSHIPS:

Reports to the Head of Koerner Library. Consults and works collaboratively with colleagues both within the unit and across the UBC Library in the provision of services, as required. A high degree of planning, collaboration and coordination with colleagues and staff in the Library, including with librarians in the Research Commons, and with campus and external partners is required.  Works with faculty, students and staff, as well as members of the public. Also works with colleagues at other libraries on shared initiatives. May supervise the work of library staff and students in the provision of services.

DUTIES:

Reference, Instruction and Liaison

  • Initiates and maintains strong working relationships and collaboration with faculty in assigned departments and subject areas. Collaborates with faculty to provide service and course-integrated instruction to students in assigned liaison areas. Engages with faculty to identify collection needs.
  • Develops and maintains a range of web-based resources to deliver information to users, including the creation of web pages, instructional materials, subject and research guides, tutorials, and other learning objects, within assigned areas of responsibility.
  • Provides research assistance, consultation, and support to users in assigned liaison areas, and across disciplines in the humanities and social sciences in general.
  • Creates and teaches workshops in relevant areas of responsibility and collaborates with researchers and scholars to provide the same.
  • Participates in a community of practice with UBC researchers and librarians to support digital scholarship research needs and projects.
  • Participates in program and service development and delivery in the UBC Library Research Commons.   Designs, develops, and delivers workshops targeted to graduate students and faculty on relevant topics and tools, including the data and digital humanities. May supervise graduate student employees in the UBC Library Research Commons in the development and delivery of workshops and consults.
  • Engages in a range of liaison and outreach activities with departments in areas of assigned responsibility, and across the UBC campus with other interested academic departments and individuals.
  • Participates in UBC Library committees and working groups, and other University, Library and campus committees, planning groups, and task forces as appropriate.  Participates in relevant conferences and meetings, and makes presentations where appropriate.  Assists with special projects or other temporary assignments as required.

Collection Development

  • Selects materials, both print and electronic, and cooperates with other librarians in the selection of material for the collections.
  • Assists in special projects and the development of collection policies. Proactively accesses the use of the collections, adjusting purchasing activities to align with user needs and interests.

Supervision and Management

  • In consultation with the Head, plans and implements services for users, or other activities as assigned, which may include supervisory responsibilities. 
  • Initiates and participates in needs assessment, design, implementation, and evaluation for the provision of services for the Library.
  • Undertakes, or assists with, special projects, committee work, or other temporary assignments as required.

Current Awareness

  • Keeps up with research developments and literature in the areas of specialization through scanning of journal literature, monitoring of electronic sources, and engagement with scholars. 
  • Maintains expertise in information resources and technologies. 
  • Keeps current with changing professional expectations, services requirements, and developments in academic libraries.

STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE:

Current and comprehensive knowledge of specialized subject areas. Responsiveness to needs of faculty, students, and other users. Provision of competent and professional research and reference service. Effective instruction and teaching. Effective use of information sources and technologies. Effective development and assessment of collections to support user needs. Innovative, efficient and creative approach to improvement of services. Strong working relations with staff and users. Effective supervision of services and staff. Familiarity with the Library’s policies, procedures, and operations.

QUALIFICATIONS:

Required:

  • A graduate degree from an accredited school of Library, Archival and Information Science
  • A strong educational background in the humanities or social sciences
  • Demonstrated ability and enthusiasm for developing, delivering and updating instructional sessions and workshops
  • Strong information technology and digital literacy skills
  • A solid understanding of the research process and the ways in which new tools and technologies are affecting the production, dissemination, and reception of research in the humanities and social sciences
  • Demonstrated ability and interest in exploring and evaluating emerging technologies
  • Demonstrated ability to initiate, plan and carry out projects, both independently and as a member of a team
  • Familiarity with current trends in library services, instruction, and bibliographic management tools within libraries and academic institutions
  • A proactive, user-centred vision of services
  • Strong interpersonal skills, ability to develop and maintain cooperative and productive working relationships and engage in workplace culture.
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Flexibility, and willingness to assume a variety of assignments
  • Excellent analytical and organizational skills
  • Experience developing partnerships and evidence of successful collaboration around the provision of programs and services
  • Ability to recognize, respect and work effectively with individuals and groups with diverse perspectives and backgrounds; takes initiative in learning about language and issues relating to equity and diversity.
  • Models and demonstrates good communication through active listening and appreciative inquiry and open to providing and receiving timely, constructive feedback.
  • Listens to, encourages and expresses creative and innovative ideas. Open to experiment and improvise with new ways of approaching processes, tasks or problems.

Preferred:

  • An academic background or related experience in Economics; Journalism; Philosophy; or Political Science
  • Knowledge of data issues in the research and knowledge creation lifecycle
  • Ability to identify, retrieve and use data resources as well as communicate knowledge to researchers with varying levels of technical expertise
  • Familiarity with Canadian census and demographic data
  • Knowledge of and experience with data analysis techniques and tools, including quantitative and qualitative software packages for data and statistical analysis
  • Knowledge of and experience with data visualization techniques and tools
  • Work experience in an academic library or educational setting relevant to the position

TERMS OF APPOINTMENT AND SALARY

This position is a full-time, term appointment for one year.

We are seeking applications from Librarians with up to 3 years of experience.  However, all internal candidates will be considered regardless of years of experience and are encouraged to apply. Salary will be commensurate with experience and academic/professional qualifications.

Applications will include: a detailed and current curriculum vitae; and a letter of application that includes a statement of citizenship/immigration status and indicates the candidate’s education, training and work experience in the areas listed above.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

To view the complete job description and to submit an application, please visit the UBC Careers page at http://www.hr.ubc.ca/careers-postings/faculty.php by midnight on October 10, 2019.

In our digital project workflow, we first evaluate copyright concerns for the submitted project proposal. Even if the collection contains historically important items to be digitized and preserved, we cannot approve the project if there are copyright restrictions or issues. This post will briefly summarize what you need to know about copyright and digitization. For more detailed information about copyright, please visit Copyright at UBC (Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office).

What is Copyright? Why do we have to care about it in digitization projects?

According to Copyright at UBC, “Copyright is the sole and exclusive right of a copyright owner to produce, reproduce, perform, publish, adapt, translate and telecommunicate a work, and to control the circumstances in which others may do any of these things. Copyright owners grant permission to others through what are legally referred to as licenses.” In the digitization context, we need to ensure the item is in the public domain or we obtain permission in order (1) to make digital copies of the items and (2) to disseminate them[i]. Making digital copies can be considered as “reproducing” the original items, and disseminating as “publishing”.

Our Digital Collection Development Policy of the UBC Library defines the collection review criteria and questions for rights issues as follows:

  1. Does the Library hold copyright for the material to be digitized?
  2. Does the Library have written documentation from the rights owner allowing it to hold a digital copy of the material?
  3. Does the Library require any other permission prior to embarking on the project?

 

As we state in our Project Planning Toolkit, the answers to any of the following questions should be “yes” when digitizing an item and publishing it in Open Collections:

  • Is the material in the public domain?
  • Does UBC hold the copyright to the material?
  • Will the copyright holder give permission to digitize the material?

 

The following collections are examples of how we have dealt with copyright:

Public Domain: Western Manuscripts and Early Printed Books

The original items in the Western Manuscripts and Early Printed Books were published between 1245 and 1680. All of the items are out of copyright, and UBC owns the materials in their entirety. Therefore, it could be digitized without worrying about copyright infringement.

[Catholicon], 1460.

Americae sive novi orbis, nova description, 1572.

 

Permission from Copyright holder: BC Sessional Papers[ii]

The items in the BC Sessional Papers collection are protected under parliamentary privilege, which applies to the materials printed by the Legislative Library of British Columbia (LLBC). Parliamentary privilege extended to printed parliamentary publications does not expire. In other words, intellectual property rights are held in perpetuity by Parliament.

In order to make the digital copies of the Sessional Papers and upload to Open Collections, we consulted with the Legislative Assembly Law Clerk and other copyright experts. Both parties signed a non-exclusive digitization and distribution agreement (Legislative Assembly of British Columbia and the University of British Columbia Library Digital Initiatives). By this agreement, the UBC Library has right to preserve and disseminate the Sessional Paper, and add the digitized materials to the UBC Library collections.

LIST OF PERSONS ENTITLED TO VOTE IN THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF ESQUIMALT, [1876].

British Columbia. Legislative Assembly, [1929]. REPORT OF LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD, 1927-28.

 

If interested in completing a project with us, please consider copyright issues prior to submitting a proposal.

 


[i] Gertz, J. (2007) 6.6 Preservation and selection for digitization. Northeast Document Center. Available at https://www.nedcc.org/free-resources/preservation-leaflets/6.-reformatting/6.6-preservation-and-selection-for-digitization Cited in Balogun, T. (2018). The nexus between digitization, preservation and access in the context of selection of materials for archives. Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal), 1893. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/1893

 

[ii] Carr-Harris, M., Curry, G., Graebner, C., Paterson, S., & Rollins, C. (2011). British Columbia Government Publications Digitization Project: Proof of Concept. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b009/ade13b914c3ead37564ead628382b05b78fd.pdf

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