The Asian Library hosted a lively Diwali celebration at the Liu Institute with the support of UBC Equity & Inclusion, Alumni UBC, and the Centre for Indian and South Asian Research on Friday, October 25. In addition to learning about the tradition of Diwali through a student-led presentation, audience members were treated to a variety of musical and dance performances, from traditional to modern, and Henna painting. The event concluded with South Asian refreshments.

 

 

 

UBC Library’s Scholarly Communications & Copyright office is now offering a new service to help UBC Vancouver instructors clear copyrighted course and teaching materials quickly and easily.

The syllabus service allows for instructors to upload course readings/syllabi directly into the Library Online Course Reserves system (LOCR) which is integrated with the Canvas Learning Management Platform and ensures that materials conform with Canadian copyright law and existing UBC license agreements and policies.

The service was introduced to help UBC Vancouver faculty meet Canadian copyright law and Fair Dealing Requirements. Any distribution of published works to students that infringes on copyright can expose both faculty and the University to legal jeopardy. The library’s goal is to make copyright compliance as streamlined and easy for UBC faculty as possible.

“We continue to take every possible step to support faculty in their teaching efforts, and ensure they remain knowledgeable and compliant with Canadian copyright law,” says Allan Bell, Associate University Librarian, Digital Programs and Services.

The service, which launched in August 2019, is already seeing significant use. “I believe this service will be very useful for everyone teaching courses at UBC,” says Christina Hendricks, Academic Director at the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, “It is an incredibly convenient way to ensure students get easy access to course materials available through the Library.”

A similar service, Mediated Course Reserves at UBCO, has been available to Faculty at UBCO since April 2018. The service connects faculty directly with librarians on the Okanagan campus, enabling them to submit class reading lists through a simple online form. “This service is really about helping faculty get this part of their teaching streamlined, says Kim Buschert, Faculty of Management Librarian at UBCO, “We see a lot of benefit there.”  Faculty at UBCO will soon be able to upload course readings/syllabi directly into the Library Online Course Reserves system (LOCR) integrated with Canvas.

Learn more about the Syllabus Service and processing timelines at UBC Vancouver.

Questions? Contact permissions.office@ubc.ca.

Learn more about Mediated Couse Reserves at UBCO.

SOUTH ASIAN

BL2017.45 W58 2018
Sri Guru Granth Sahib vich simran duara naroe samaj da sankalp : sidhant ate vihar / by Dr. Narinder Singh Virk

PK2098.25 A65 G55 2018
Short stroies. Selections. Gilli chatri / Jayantī Raṅganāthana

PK2099.32 R57 R34 2018
Raahbaaz / by Pritpal Kaur

PK2200 R2145 B36 2018
بنارس والى گلى‏ : ‏ناول ‏ / ‏فيّاض رفعت = Banaras wali galli : novel / by Faiyaz Riffat

PK2659 K25553 S53 2018
Shehar vich saahn hon da matlab : novel / by Des Raj Kali

PK2659 S2328 L63 2018
Loh nagar de parinde : short stories / by Avtar Singh Sadiq.

PK2659 S36282 W35 2018
Waqt beeteya nahi : novel / by Yadwinder Singh Sandhu

PN481 G65 2018
Muhabatnama / by Jung Bahadur Goyal


JAPANESE

BQ8749 S557 Y84 2018
唯信鈔文意 : 親鸞思想を読み解く / 親鸞仏教センター 訳・解說

DS881.3 S745 2019
明治維新と近代日本の新しい見方 / M.ウィリアム・スティール著 ; 大野ロベルト訳

HN723.5 N435 2018
日常のなかの「フツー」を問いなおす : 現代社会の差別・抑圧 / 植上一希, 伊藤亜希子編

ND1059 M824 A4 2018
画集, 富士への道 / 村上裕二

P94.65 C6 H34 2019
中華オタク用語辞典 / はちこ著

PL675 K66 2018
「日本国語大辞典」をよむ / 今野真二著

PL830 B8 Z77 2018
水の匂いがするようだ : 井伏鱒二のほうへ / 野崎歓

PN2924.5 N6 N5755 2018
能舞台, 歴史を巡る / 写真森田拾史郎 ; 文児玉信, 池田哲夫


KOREAN

BL2240 C54 C44 2018
조 재훈 문학 선집. 3, 동학 가요 연구

DS902.2 Y5 2018
완역 정본 택리지 / 이 중환 지음 ; 안 대회, 이 승용 외 옮김

DS932.23 K37 2018
평양 밖 북조선 : 999장 의 사진 에 담은 북쪽 의 북한 / 글, 사진 강 동완.

GT1755 K6 Y577 2019
조선 1637-1897 왕비 의 옷 을 짓다 / 이 봉이 지음

ND1063.4 Y865 2018
조선 시대 회화 : 오늘 만나는 우리 옛 그림 / 윤 철규 지음

PL980.2 N385 2018
나 의 인도 / 박 완서 [and ten others]

PL980.6 S565 2019
2019 신춘 문예 당선 소설집 / [저자 함 지원 외]

PL991.9 S3 Z7855 2018
이 상 시 의 비극적 에로티시즘 / 박 소영 지음


CHINESE

BV3427 B6 A3 2018
一个西方传教士的长征亲历记 / (瑞士)薄复礼著 ; 严强, 席伟译 ; 田洁校

DS796 M24 H43 2019
澳門地理 / 何大章, 繆鴻基合著

ND1043.4 P465 2018
虛拟的殿堂 : 南宋画院之省舍职制与后世想象 / (美)彭慧萍著

ND1049 H8 X53 2018
画纸上的道境 : 黄公望和他的富春山居图 / 谢波著

PL2951.5 Y8 L824 2019
綠色. 第三卷 / 歐陽昱

PN56. P74 H836 2018
晚清民国时期中国文学的欢场书写研究 / 黄静著

 

Image courtesy of Pixabay

 

INTERNATIONAL

Open Access

We Support the UNESCO Recommendation on OER

The role of preprints in research dissemination

A young researcher’s guide to open access publishing

 

Open Access Week 2019

Plan S compliance for Open Access Journals – what we know so far and where we think we’re heading

NOTE: See also Recordings: LINK and Slides: PDF on SlideShare

“Flipping” to (more) open when you’re already open

Preprints and the long and winding road to Open Access

Open and Engaged: Open Access Week at the British Library

Taking the Long View of Open Access

 

Open Data

The State of Open Data Report 2019

 

Open Education

For the Edtech Innovation Today’s Learners Need, Look Not to Companies, But to Campuses

Reaping the benefits of Open Data in public health

 

NATIONAL

SPARC Landscape Analysis

Canadian Science Publishing – Open A Conversation Q&A series for Open Access Week with Dr. Alana Westwood

JHU Press celebrates International Open Access Week by publishing 100 OA books

Call for Submissions: Innovations in Open

 

LOCAL

Open Access Week at UBC

Ongoing Adoption – Estimating, Calculating, and Tracking

BCcampus heads to #OpenEd19

AMS Open Champions Celebration

2019 OER Faculty Panel Roundup

Open, Equitable, Affordable, and Transparent: Progress on the Road to True Open Access: A Talk by Ginny Steel

Can we Decolonize Open? An Open Access Week Event presented by Langara, Kwantlen, BCIT, SFU, and UBC

 

 

DHSI – the Digital Humanities Summer Institute – is a training program held every summer at the University of Victoria. Delivered over a week, each course is an intensive series of classes interspersed with colloquiums, unconferences, and other community-based events, and provides an ideal environment for influencing teaching, research, dissemination, creation, and preservation in different disciplines. Course offerings have historically included such topics as text analysis, data visualization, digital pedagogy, programming, topic modelling, and more.

We are pleased to confirm that UBC Library is continuing as a sponsoring partner of DHSI thanks to the support of University Librarian Susan Parker. As part of this sponsorship, the Library provides free registration – normally $950 with the early bird rate, or $1,250 at full cost – for five library employees to attend a course at DSHI 2020, held on June 1-5 or 8-12.

If you would like to be considered for one of these sponsored spots, please submit the following to digital.initiatives@ubc.ca by Tuesday, November 12th:

  • A short statement of interest (300 words max)
  • Your preferred course(s)
  • Source(s) of funding you would use to cover the other costs of attending DHSI (travel, accommodation, incidentals)
  • If you have attended DHSI in the past on UBC Library-sponsored spot: the years you attended and the courses you completed

Any UBC Library staff member with an interest in Digital Humanities is invited to apply. We hope to notify successful applicants by November 19th.

NOTE: Participants from sponsoring institutions can also attend DHSI at a reduced rate of $650, using a discount code. If you are planning to attend DHSI next year and are interested in registering at this discounted rate, please contact Larissa Ringham (larissa.ringham@ubc.ca) for the code *before you register*, as the discount cannot be applied retroactively. Scholarships are also available by applying to DHSI directly.

We look forward to seeing your applications! Please let us know if you have any questions.

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K487.L36 L588 2014
Julen Etxabe & Gary Watt, eds., Living in a Law Transformed: Encounters with the Works of James Boyd White ([Ann Arbor]: Maize Books, 2014).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE444 .F58 2019
Barry Wright et al., Looking at Law: Canada’s Legal System, 7th ed. (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada Inc., 2019).

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KKE850 .M33 2019
Bruce MacDougall, Introduction to Contracts, 4th ed. (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada Inc., 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE9348 .M36 2019
Brian Manarin, Canadian Indigenous Peoples and Criminal Jury Trials: Remediating Inequities (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF390.5.C6 R87 2019
Michael L. Rustad, Global Internet Law in a Nutshell, 4th ed. (St. Paul: West Academic Publishing, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF505.Z9 K7 2019
John E.B. Myers, Family Law in a Nutshell, 7th ed. (St. Paul: West Academic Publishing, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF975 .L68 2019
Michael P. Malloy, Banking and Financial Institutions Law in a Nutshell, 9th ed. (St. Paul: West Academic Publishing, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KZ7312 .K56 2019
Young Sok Kim, The Law of the International Criminal Court, 2nd ed. (Getzville: William S. Hein & Co., Inc., 2019).

The British Columbia provincial government releases a report on the small business landscape every year. In this year’s report you will find out how small businesses impact the BC economy and how today’s small business landscape compares to previous years and the rest of Canada.

“Small business” refers to both small businesses that have 0-50 employees and micro-businesses with less than 5 employees.

Before accessing the full report here, below are some key highlights:

Key 2018 Statistics
  • Almost 1.1 million British Columbians have worked in a small business
  • BC small businesses paid 32% of all wages in BC
  • 6,089 small businesses exported goods outside Canada
Small Businesses are Significant to BC’s Economy

Small businesses provide many of the goods and services that support larger resources companies in Canada. BC is ranked second out of all Canadian provinces in the number of small businesses per capita at 101.9 per 1,000 people, right behind Alberta. The North Coast and Nechako region saw the strongest growth in BC with its small businesses making up 31.9% of all businesses there. This growth is likely in response to the $40 billion investment by LNG Canada and activities related to it.

More Diversity in BC`s Small Business Landscape

Self-employed people in BC are generally older (61% are 45+ years) and male (62%). However, the number of female entrepreneurs are growing in BC, on pace with the rest of Canada.

Small Businesses Key to Job Creation and Economic Growth

Out of all other Canadian provinces, BC leads in GDP from small businesses (34% of BC GDP). BC has also seen the highest small business growth among other provinces at 7.7% over the last 5 years. Small businesses also employ 1.1 million workers in BC, provide 53% of all private sector employment, and pay out 32% of all wages in BC.

Small Businesses Making a Mark in the Global Economy

BC small businesses have trading partners across the globe, making up 85% of all international exporters making BC the biggest international exporter to destinations outside of North America (51%). In 2018, BC small businesses exported $15.8 billion and 32% of total provincial exports. 

British Columbia Offers Favourable Climates for Small Business Growth

At 2%, BC has one of the lowest small business tax rates in Canada right after Manitoba (0%) and is on par with Alberta and Saskatchewan. BC also leads in highest growth in value of issued building permits at 22.9% (Canadian average is 4.7%), indicating strong building activity. BC also reports the lowest small business bankruptcy rates in Canada at 0.1 per 1,000 businesses while the Canadian average is 0.7 per 1,000 businesses.

The original report was developed by the Government of British Columbia and can be accessed here. For more information and resources available, please click here.

Interested in how these compare to previous years? Refer to our past summaries of the Small Business Profile:
Small Business Profile 2014
Small Business Profile 2013
Small Business Profile 2012

Sources:

BC Small Business Profile 2019
(2019 October 24)

Photo by Mike Petrucci on Unsplash

The British Columbia provincial government releases a report on the small business landscape every year. In this year’s report you will find out how small businesses impact the BC economy and how today’s small business landscape compares to previous years and the rest of Canada.

“Small business” refers to both small businesses that have 0-50 employees and micro-businesses with less than 5 employees.

Before accessing the full report here, below are some key highlights:

Key 2018 Statistics
  • Almost 1.1 million British Columbians have worked in a small business
  • BC small businesses paid 32% of all wages in BC
  • 6,089 small businesses exported goods outside Canada
Small Businesses are Significant to BC’s Economy

Small businesses provide many of the goods and services that support larger resources companies in Canada. BC is ranked second out of all Canadian provinces in the number of small businesses per capita at 101.9 per 1,000 people, right behind Alberta. The North Coast and Nechako region saw the strongest growth in BC with its small businesses making up 31.9% of all businesses there. This growth is likely in response to the $40 billion investment by LNG Canada and activities related to it.

More Diversity in BC`s Small Business Landscape

Self-employed people in BC are generally older (61% are 45+ years) and male (62%). However, the number of female entrepreneurs are growing in BC, on pace with the rest of Canada.

Small Businesses Key to Job Creation and Economic Growth

Out of all other Canadian provinces, BC leads in GDP from small businesses (34% of BC GDP). BC has also seen the highest small business growth among other provinces at 7.7% over the last 5 years. Small businesses also employ 1.1 million workers in BC, provide 53% of all private sector employment, and pay out 32% of all wages in BC.

Small Businesses Making a Mark in the Global Economy

BC small businesses have trading partners across the globe, making up 85% of all international exporters making BC the biggest international exporter to destinations outside of North America (51%). In 2018, BC small businesses exported $15.8 billion and 32% of total provincial exports. 

British Columbia Offers Favourable Climates for Small Business Growth

At 2%, BC has one of the lowest small business tax rates in Canada right after Manitoba (0%) and is on par with Alberta and Saskatchewan. BC also leads in highest growth in value of issued building permits at 22.9% (Canadian average is 4.7%), indicating strong building activity. BC also reports the lowest small business bankruptcy rates in Canada at 0.1 per 1,000 businesses while the Canadian average is 0.7 per 1,000 businesses.

The original report was developed by the Government of British Columbia and can be accessed here. For more information and resources available, please click here.

Interested in how these compare to previous years? Refer to our past summaries of the Small Business Profile:
Small Business Profile 2014
Small Business Profile 2013
Small Business Profile 2012

Sources:

BC Small Business Profile 2019
(2019 October 24)

Photo by Mike Petrucci on Unsplash

Many thanks to guest blogger Alvionne Gardner-Harrison for contributing the below post! Alvionne is a graduate student at UBC’s iSchool (School of Library, Archival and Information Studies) and is currently working with UBC Library’s W.C. Gibson History of Science and Medicine Collection as a professional experience project.

An Ocean of Knowledge, a Sea of Books: The Ocean and its Inhabitants in the W.C. Gibson History of Science and Medicine Collection

For Science Literacy Week 2019, one of the exhibits shared by Rare Books and Special Collections focused on materials from the W.C. Gibson History of Science and Medicine collection. With exhibit items ranging from sea otters on book-bindings to hand-painted seaweed fronds, and from the earliest studies in microscopy to guides for hobbyist naturalists, “An Ocean of Knowledge, a Sea of Books” gives some historical background to the ocean science highlighted in this year’s Science Literacy Week theme.

The exhibit of European scientific literature and illustration from the 17th-19th century explores representations of oceanic life and the techniques and technologies that were used to gather, organize, and distribute information about oceanic organisms. For much of the history of science that the W.C. Gibson collection documents, manuscripts and printed books were the main format in which new scientific observations and ideas were disseminated. The physical qualities of organisms such as fish, molluscs, and sea mammals that were encountered on colonial scientific expeditions, could best be preserved through detailed illustrations that were then reproduced in copperplate and sometimes coloured by hand. These striking images, organized according to new taxonomic systems like that of Linnaeus, were distributed in books such as those in this exhibit. The books included in the exhibit’s cases, some of which are featured below, highlight both ocean science and scientific literacy prior to the 20th century.

Microscopy, Taxonomy, and Colonial Voyages

Significant advances in technology, both intellectual and material, were required for European scientists to systematically study oceanic organisms, as was the expansion of colonial voyages. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and Robert Hooke contributed to the nascent biological sciences through their development of microscopes and their demonstration of how they could be used to study microscopic organisms and the structures within larger organisms.

  • Hooke, Robert. Micrographia (1665). [QH271 .H79 1665]
  • Leeuwenhoek, Antoni van. Vervolg der brieven (1704). [QH41 .L4393]
  • Mantell, Gideon Algernon. Thoughts on animalcules: or, A glimpse of the invisible world revealed by the microscope (1846). [QL365 .M35 1846]

Snow, In forbidden seas. [F5817.S3 S6].

Taxonomic systems enabled naturalists to organise newly discovered (and previously known) life forms into meaningful categories and to better understand them. Encountering unfamiliar varieties of oceanic animals and plants required journeying abroad. This usually took place in the context of voyages on merchant ships; “discovery” was funded and enabled by the processes of capitalism and colonialism.

  • Pennant, Thomas. Arctic Zoology, II (1784). [QL105 .P4]
  • Linné, Carl von. Systema naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines (1767). [QH43 .S9 1767]

The Material Science Book

The physical descriptions of organisms that were encountered on both local and colonial scientific expeditions could be communicated most effectively through detailed illustrations. These images were then reproduced as prints which were made from copperplate engravings, and which could be easily shared throughout the scientific community. In the 19th century, these illustrations were also widely printed in less expensive—but often beautifully bound—books for the general public, who enthusiastically engaged in early popular science.

  • Gosse, Philip Henry. A history of the British sea-anemones and corals: with coloured figures of the species and principal varieties (1860). [QL377.C7 G67 1860]
  • Adams, Henry Gardiner. Beautiful shells: their nature, structure, and uses familiarly explained, with directions for collection, cleaning, and arranging them in the cabinet and descriptions of the most remarkable species (1871). [QL405 .A33 1871]
  • Recent polar voyages: a record of discovery and adventure from the search after Franklin to the British polar expedition, 1875-76 (1877). [G625 .R35]

Hamilton, The natural history of the amphibious carnivora. [QL737.P6 H2 1839]

Mechanized reproduction of images reduced costs, but some book buyers still chose to have illustrations hand-painted with striking colour on top of the printed images, such as the unusually large seaweed pictured in The botany of the Antarctic voyage of H. M. discovery ships Erebus and Terror.

  • Hooker, Joseph Dalton. The botany of the Antarctic voyage of H. M. discovery ships Erebus and Terror, in the years 1839-1843, under the command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross (1844). [QK5 .E6 1844]

Inconceivable Ichthyology

This case featured examples of illustrations depicting fishes identified and illustrated during global voyages of exploration and organized according to the binomial nomenclature of Linnaeus.

  • Richardson, John. Ichthyology of the voyage of H.M.S. Erebus & Terror, under the command of Captain Sir James Clark Ross (1844). [QL636 .R52]
  • Schomburgk, Robert Hermann. Natural history of the fishes of Guiana (1843). [QL632.A3 B8 1843]
  • Bennett, James William. A selection of rare and curious fishes found upon the coast of Ceylon: from drawings made in that island, and coloured from life, with letter-press descriptions (1851). [QL634.C3 B4 1851]
  • Fries, Bengt Fredrik. A History of Scandinavian Fishes, Vol. II (1893). [QL633.S22 F74 1893 v.2]

From “Sea Monsters” to Seals

In addition to an extensive selection of books on fishes, the Gibson collection includes scientific materials on aquatic plants, molluscs, seabirds, and sea mammals, among other groups of organisms recognized during the 19th century.

  • Sowerby, George Brettingham. Genera of recent and fossil shells (1820). [QL 404 S 68]

Dewhurst, The natural history of the order cetacea. [QL737.C4 D5 1834].

Of particular note are books containing illustrations of cetaceans, a group which includes whales, and of various types of seals. These sea mammals were not only of interest from a scientific perspective; increasing awareness of their physical properties and habits improved the effectiveness and efficiency of organized hunting. The object of this was to convert these animals’ bodies into fuel and luxury goods, an effort that was often too successful to be sustainable in the long term. Some sea mammal populations remain subject to conservation efforts today as a result of this hunting.

  • Dewhurst, Henry William. The natural history of the order cetacea, and the oceanic inhabitants of the Arctic regions (1834). [QL737.C4 D5 1834]
  • Hamilton, Robert. The natural history of the amphibious carnivora, including the walrus and seals, also of the herbivorous cetacea. [QL737.P6 H2 1839]
  • Snow, Henry James. In forbidden seas: Recollections of sea-otter hunting in the Kurils (1910). [F5817.S3 S6]

The latest Collection Spotlight display is up and the theme is Stories Without Words.  These wordless picture books (and books close to it) are on display in the main level breezeway of our branch and are great for new language learners, writing prompts, and imagination.  If you can’t make it in person, we also have a great Wordless Picture Books Booklist to browse.

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