Did you know that, in 1998, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) was founded by John Willinsky in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (UBC)? Its aim was and still is today to “improv[e] the scholarly and public quality of research”.

UBC “support[s] scholarly pursuits that contribute to knowledge and understanding within and across disciplines and seek[s] every opportunity to share them broadly” as outlined in the From UBC’s Place and Promise Strategic Plan and echoed in the Library’s Strategic Framework. Discover why PKP is a critical platform in open scholarly communications infrastructure via Digital Programs and Services at UBC Library.

 

Read the Library’s full PKP blog post

 

Explore Open Journals Systems (OJS)

 

Find out more about Open UBC

 

 

KOREAN

DS916.35 H37 2018
한국 의 정치 와 정치 이념 / 이 동수 외 지음

ML3502 K6 K5765164 2018
케이팝 의 작은 역사 : 신감각 의 미디어 / 김 성민

PL980.6 C483 v.10
2019 제 10회 젊은 작가상 수상 작품집

PL981.7 Y55 v.43
그들 의 첫 번째 와 두 번째 고양이 외 5편 : 2019년 제43회 이상 문학상 작품집 : 대상 수상작 윤 이형 의 / 윤 이형, 김 희선, 장 강명, 장 은진, 정 용준, 최 은영


CHINESE

DS750.72 X8966 2019
明清江南文士治生研究 / 徐永斌著

DS777.5195 W34 A5 2019
汪精衛政治論述新編 : 文章 · 演講 · 書信 · 電報 / 作者汪精衛

DS799.65 L56 2019
大航海時代 / 作者林偉盛

E183.8 C6 C475 2018
中美文化交流与比较研究 / 陈志章著

GN722 T28 L58 2019
史前人群與文化 / 作者劉益昌

NB1049 G36 2018
高云龙口述历史 / 高云龙口述 ; 陈正卿撰稿

PL2822 C3 W36 2019
汪精衛南社詩話 : 汪精衛以「曼昭」署名之文學評論 / 作者汪精衛

PL2851 S5 Z57 2019
紫罗兰的魅影 : 周瘦鹃与上海文学文化(1911-1949) / 陈建华著

PL2929.5 N49 S49 2019
伸出蘭花指 : 對一個男旦的陳述 / 章詒和

PN5367 I44 C44 2018
左圖右史与西學东漸 : 晚清画报研究 / 陈平原著


JAPANESE

BQ8743.2 B848 2018
仏教英書伝道のあけぼの / 編著中西直樹, 那須英勝, 嵩満也

DS891 N365 2018
噓に支配される日本 / 中野晃一 , 福島みずほ.

DS897 T675 M55 2018
三河吉田城 : 今川・松平が奪いあった「水城」 / 岩原剛編

GT2915 S555 2018
茶の湯の羽箒 : 知られざる鳥の文化誌 / 下坂玉起

HV8699 J3 K65 2018
袴田事件これでも死刑なのか / 小石勝朗

JC573/2 J3 N348 2018
保守と大東亜戦争 / 中島岳志

NK4168 K87 N35 2018
京焼 : 伝統と革新 / 中ノ堂一信

PL675 O823 Y38 2018
大槻文彦「言海」 : 辞書と日本の近代 / 安田敏朗

PL719.79 B86 2019
文化装置としての日本漢文学 / 滝川幸司, 中本大, 福島理子, 合山林太郎編

TT872.5 E396 2019
英訳付き折り紙帖 / 小林一夫監修

As part of the exhibition “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” presented by The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library, we are delighted to share profiles of Fluevogers at UBC.

 

Linda Tommasini is currently the Director of Resources and Operations at UBC’s Sauder School of Business where she has been working for almost 20 years.

 

When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they?

I got them in 1974! They were off white dress shoes with a strap around the ankle and pointed toes. I loved those shoes. They fit like a glove and felt so soft - like I was wearing a slipper! The quality is unbelievable.

What do Fluevogs mean to you?  

Three words that come to mind are identifiable, unique, and Vancouver! I can recognize a Fluevog shoe when I see one.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

Not really; however, I do have a friend who constantly buys Fluevog shoes and I must say I am very envious. A cool thing I just found out is that when she no longer wants her Fluevogs and wants to buy another pair, there is a used Fluevog site she can sell them on. I love the idea - I think it is terrific and very sustainable. Kudos to them!

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

I feel like I am in heaven. They are just so comfortable and they make you feel like you do not have anything on your feet.

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

I used to own several a long time ago but not anymore because my priorities as to where I spend my money has changed. Otherwise, I would be buying them!

What is your favourite Fluevog? Why?

The ones I initially bought (too many years ago) takes me back to that special event in my life. I worked very hard for those shoes and at the time, I was very young and it was a luxury for me to buy them. They were the BEST shoes I have ever owned!

 

As part of the exhibition “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” presented by The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library, we are delighted to share profiles of Fluevogers at UBC.

 

Linda Tommasini is currently the Director of Resources and Operations at UBC’s Sauder School of Business where she has been working for almost 20 years.

 

When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they?

I got them in 1974! They were off white dress shoes with a strap around the ankle and pointed toes. I loved those shoes. They fit like a glove and felt so soft - like I was wearing a slipper! The quality is unbelievable.

What do Fluevogs mean to you?  

Three words that come to mind are identifiable, unique, and Vancouver! I can recognize a Fluevog shoe when I see one.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

Not really; however, I do have a friend who constantly buys Fluevog shoes and I must say I am very envious. A cool thing I just found out is that when she no longer wants her Fluevogs and wants to buy another pair, there is a used Fluevog site she can sell them on. I love the idea - I think it is terrific and very sustainable. Kudos to them!

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

I feel like I am in heaven. They are just so comfortable and they make you feel like you do not have anything on your feet.

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

I used to own several a long time ago but not anymore because my priorities as to where I spend my money has changed. Otherwise, I would be buying them!

What is your favourite Fluevog? Why?

The ones I initially bought (too many years ago) takes me back to that special event in my life. I worked very hard for those shoes and at the time, I was very young and it was a luxury for me to buy them. They were the BEST shoes I have ever owned!

 

As part of the exhibition “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” presented by The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library, we are delighted to share profiles of Fluevogers at UBC.

Harry Young is the Development Coordinator in the Development & Alumni Engagement Department for the Faculty of Education. Previously, he was the executive coordinator at UBC Library. He has been involved in UBC Library’s United Way campaign and launched the annual Spelling Bee in 2010. Outside of work, he enjoys playing tennis and sometimes even serves as an on-court umpire for Tennis BC and Tennis Canada.

 

When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they?

1978 – If memory serves correctly they were clogs. Black suede on black leather. Handmade locally.

What do Fluevogs mean to you?

Almost my very first job was as a sales clerk then store manager at Fox & Fluevog Boots & Shoes as it was known back then. In those days the shoes were mostly imported from Europe. Peter Fox began designing shoes while I was around but John Fluevog didn’t start designing until after I had left. So I didn’t really know about “Fluevogs” until much later.

That said, I loved working there and was pretty close with John in those days.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

I was 18 when I started working there while still living at home. I bought a lot of pretty outrageous shoes. My parents thought I was bonkers. I remember the high heeled men’s disco shoes from Spain. I think they were called “Misters”. About a 3 inch heel, burgundy leather with a brass toe. Very Saturday Night Fever. Then there were the red patent leather short cowboy boots with silver trim. And of course the Dr. Martens. Black suede with metal studs. White leather with black leather weaving. I thought I was so cool!

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

Not boring. I actually do have a few pairs of genuine Fluevogs that I bought some years ago. Love them and they wear incredibly well.

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

Only 3 now, but back in the day I had upwards of 50 pairs! (We got a 50% discount!)

What is your favourite Fluevog? Why?

I have a pair of short boots made with multi-coloured suede inlays. The colours are quite muted, but they are still pretty groovy in my opinion.

Photo courtesy of Harry Young

Photo courtesy of Harry Young

As part of the exhibition “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” presented by The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library, we are delighted to share profiles of Fluevogers at UBC.

Harry Young is the Development Coordinator in the Development & Alumni Engagement Department for the Faculty of Education. Previously, he was the executive coordinator at UBC Library. He has been involved in UBC Library’s United Way campaign and launched the annual Spelling Bee in 2010. Outside of work, he enjoys playing tennis and sometimes even serves as an on-court umpire for Tennis BC and Tennis Canada.

 

When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they?

1978 – If memory serves correctly they were clogs. Black suede on black leather. Handmade locally.

What do Fluevogs mean to you?

Almost my very first job was as a sales clerk then store manager at Fox & Fluevog Boots & Shoes as it was known back then. In those days the shoes were mostly imported from Europe. Peter Fox began designing shoes while I was around but John Fluevog didn’t start designing until after I had left. So I didn’t really know about “Fluevogs” until much later.

That said, I loved working there and was pretty close with John in those days.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

I was 18 when I started working there while still living at home. I bought a lot of pretty outrageous shoes. My parents thought I was bonkers. I remember the high heeled men’s disco shoes from Spain. I think they were called “Misters”. About a 3 inch heel, burgundy leather with a brass toe. Very Saturday Night Fever. Then there were the red patent leather short cowboy boots with silver trim. And of course the Dr. Martens. Black suede with metal studs. White leather with black leather weaving. I thought I was so cool!

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

Not boring. I actually do have a few pairs of genuine Fluevogs that I bought some years ago. Love them and they wear incredibly well.

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

Only 3 now, but back in the day I had upwards of 50 pairs! (We got a 50% discount!)

What is your favourite Fluevog? Why?

I have a pair of short boots made with multi-coloured suede inlays. The colours are quite muted, but they are still pretty groovy in my opinion.

Photo courtesy of Harry Young

Photo courtesy of Harry Young

Attend an all-day workshop with renowned conservator Mr. Kazunori Oryū on December 10.

Public Knowledge Project

 

UBC Library is playing a pivotal role in improving the quality and reach of scholarly publishing, serving as one of six development partners in the Public Knowledge Project, a not-for-profit multi-university initiative that develops (free) open source software and services to make open access a viable option for journals.

Founded in 1998 and currently based out of Simon Fraser University, the Public Knowledge Project is perhaps best known for its Open Journal Systems (OJS) software, currently used to publish over 10,000 open access journals around the world. The free journal management and publishing system assists with every stage of the refereed publishing process, from submissions through to online publication and indexing. The project is supported by a group of librarians, scholars and developers in various capacities at a number of universities worldwide. 

“We feel the work PKP does is so important, that it is worth investing both our money and our time,” says Bronwen Sprout, Head, Digital Programs and Services at UBC Library who serves as PKP Preservation Network (PKP PN) Coordinator, providing guidance and leadership relating to PKP’s digital preservation service for OJS journals. The PKP Preservation Network is a critical complement to the OJS software that works with a network of partners to create a “dark archive” of journals distributed across the globe. In order to ensure that journals preserved in the network are available to the reading public long after their original website is gone, a network of eight partners stores identical copies of each issue, mitigating against loss from natural disaster or human activity.

A critical platform in open scholarly communications infrastructure.

In addition to OJS, PKP develops Open Monograph Press, a management system for peer-reviewed scholarly monographs, the Open Conference system, a free online publishing tool that allows researchers to host conference websites, manage submissions and post conference proceedings, and Open Harvester Systems, a free metadata system that allows researchers to create searchable online databases. PKP also supports research that explores broader areas of scholarly communications and training services to help new publishers build their skills and knowledge in the PKP software.

Allan Bell, Associate University Librarian, Digital programs and services at UBC Library, chairs the PKP Advisory Committee, which oversees the project’s finances and strategic directions. “What started out as a small research project at UBC has grown into one of the most important platforms in the international, open scholarly communications infrastructure.  As a non-profit, university based academic-led project, PKP needs to demonstrate that it operates efficiently, effectively and responsibly, and the Advisory Committee ensures that happens.”

The Public Knowledge Project was most recently awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award, part of the Open Publishing Awards at #Force2019.

Learn more about the Public Knowledge Project.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to advance research, learning and scholarship.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

As we head into final exams, the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre will stay open longer to accommodate students and their study schedules. The Learning Centre will be open 24 hours a day from Monday, December 2 (opening at 6 a.m.) to Friday, December 13 (closing at 1 a.m.).

UPDATE: This workshop has been postponed for a new date in 2020. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. Please check our blog later or contact Tomoko Kitayama Yen at tomoko.kitayama@ubc.ca for more information.

 

Date: Tuesday, December 10, 2019
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Rare Books and Special Collections Seminar Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 Eest Mall, Vancouver BC
Instructor: Mr. Kazunori Oryū

UBC Library is offering a basic Japanese paper conservation workshop by renowned conservator, Mr. Kazunori Oryū. Mr. Oryū has studied painting conservation at the studio of Oka Bokkōdō in Kyōto where he developed his skills and expertise working with Japanese cultural heritage items such as hanging scrolls, screens and books. He is a Conservation Consultant for private and public collections, and he provides preservation planning and preventive and conservation treatment service for paintings, heritage document and manuscript collections. He has lectured extensively in North America and Europe.

This workshop focuses on Japanese scroll mounting and bookbinding using Japanese restoration and conservation techniques. The workshop will incorporate lectures, demonstrations and practical work including handling of Japanese traditional materials. This is a valuable professional development opportunity for paper conservators as well as for artists, craftspeople, library and museum staff, and anyone interested in the Japanese book history.

Admissions is free, but registration is required. Please register here: Registration Link

For more information, please contact Tomoko Kitayama Yen, Japanese Studies Librarian, at tomoko.kitayama@ubc.ca.

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