The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library are pleased to present “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” which is on display in David Lam Library from November 20 to December 24, […]

The Chung Collection has thousands of photographs and related material on CPR steamships with a particular emphasis on the Empress class ships. Some of the related material includes pamphlets, menus, world cruise photograph albums, clippings, diaries, and correspondence from both passengers and employees of these vessels.

In this two-part series, we will explore some advertisements issued by CPR steamships. To view the first part, please click here.

Here is a letter card featuring images of the SS Duchess of Richmond’s interiors. A letter card consists of a folded card with a prepaid imprinted stamp. The letter is written on the inside, and the card is then folded and sealed.

S.S. Duchess of Richmond letter card, [1937?]

Unlike a postcard, a letter card can contain multiple photographs. The unfolded letter card of the SS Duchess of Richmond contains photos of the dining saloon, the observation lounge and drawing room, the smoking room, the shop and promenade deck entrance, and a two-berth room with bathroom adjoining.

S.S. Duchess of Richmond letter card, [1937?]

SS Duchess of Richmond was an ocean liner built in 1928 for Canadian Pacific. In 1947 she was renamed as SS Empress of Canada (source: Great Ships).

Canadian Pacific to Canada Duchess of Richmond, 1929

This is a booklet promoting the S.S. Melita, Minnedosa and Metagama steamships.

The three M’s : S.S. Minnedosa, Melita, Metagama, [1919?]

The three Ms were steamships carrying one-class cabin and third class. Many passengers who couldn’t afford the first class also didn’t like the second class because of the difference of service between the first and second classes, such as the dividing line on the decks and different food. By combining first and second classes, the three Ms provided one-class-cabin service at a more affordable price.

The three M’s : S.S. Minnedosa, Melita, Metagama, [1919?], p. 14-15

This pamphlet was issued to passengers on the Montroyal‘s 7 Sept. 1929 sailing from Southampton and Cherbourg to Quebec.

Steamship Montroyal, 1929

Along with railway, steamships, and hotels, the CPR also had telegraph operations and trucking operations as part of its travel system. This pamphlet provides Montroyal’s passengers detailed information about where to buy railway tickets, where to get money orders and travelers’ cheques, and where to stay, all through the CPR’s services.

Steamship Montroyal, 1929, p. 27

Here is an interesting comparison between the CPR steamships and buildings. The Royal York, Toronto, is a luxuy hotel built by the CPR. After its completion in 1929, it was the tallest building in Canada and the British Empire (source: Wikipedia). When the pamphlet was published in 1929, the RMS Empress of Britain was still under construction. She was launched in 1930 and became the largest, fastest, and most luxurious ship between England and Canada in her time (source: Wikipedia).

We hope you enjoyed the post. To find out more about the CPR steamships, please explore the Chung Collection!

Get to know a Fluevogger: Siân Echard​

As part of the exhibition “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” presented by The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library, we are delighted to share profiles of Fluevogers at UBC, and some snapshots into their shoe collections.​

Siân Echard is a Professor in the English Department at the University of British Columbia. She offers undergraduate and graduate courses in Middle English literature, the Arthurian tradition, medievalism, and book history. She has received a UBC Killam Research Prize (1998), a UBC Killam Teaching Prize (2001), and was named a Distinguished University Scholar in 2004.

 

When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they? 

It was a long time ago – black “serve and be served” lace-up pumps – they have stacked heels and metal hooks for the laces. The series is called the Teacup Series, I think. I still have them.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

My favourite story is about my two pairs (that’s where the story comes in) of Pearl Harts. I was going to a conference in China, and had been advised that conservative dress was best, so I was looking for a pair of plain black heels. I went to the Granville store, and there was a very nice pair of Pearl Harts in solid black. There was ALSO a pair in black with cream contrasting trim. I dithered, but the salesperson said to me, sternly, “I will remind you, you said you needed a pair of plain black shoes.” So, I bought the plain black ones, and took them home, and they were lovely, and they were just right for the upcoming conference, but I also couldn’t stop talking about the others. My husband finally said, “You should go back and buy them as well.” The next day, I was back in the Granville store, and went straight to the display model of the black and cream pair – and my face fell, because they were a size 9 (I’m a 6.5, and that’s what had been on display the previous day). The same sales guy saw me, disappeared into the back, and came out with the black and cream, in my size. He said, “I figured you’d be back, and I didn’t want there to be tears.”

What do Fluevogs mean to you?

For me they’re the perfect shoe – a way to make an ordinary outfit just a bit unusual, the kind of shoe that is memorable, in a good way. I often find myself in conversation with strangers when I wear a pair – people will stop me on the street to compliment the shoes, or ask where I got them. I like that they’re from Vancouver – the local angle is very appealing.

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

Happy!

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

I think I just bought pair number 20 – silver Mission Katie lace-up wedge boots. Both my (now adult) children have several pairs too – I got them hooked early!

Photos courtesy of Siân Echard

Photos courtesy of Siân Echard

Get to know a Fluevogger: Siân Echard​

As part of the exhibition “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” presented by The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library, we are delighted to share profiles of Fluevogers at UBC, and some snapshots into their shoe collections.​

Siân Echard is a Professor in the English Department at the University of British Columbia. She offers undergraduate and graduate courses in Middle English literature, the Arthurian tradition, medievalism, and book history. She has received a UBC Killam Research Prize (1998), a UBC Killam Teaching Prize (2001), and was named a Distinguished University Scholar in 2004.

 

When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they? 

It was a long time ago – black “serve and be served” lace-up pumps – they have stacked heels and metal hooks for the laces. The series is called the Teacup Series, I think. I still have them.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

My favourite story is about my two pairs (that’s where the story comes in) of Pearl Harts. I was going to a conference in China, and had been advised that conservative dress was best, so I was looking for a pair of plain black heels. I went to the Granville store, and there was a very nice pair of Pearl Harts in solid black. There was ALSO a pair in black with cream contrasting trim. I dithered, but the salesperson said to me, sternly, “I will remind you, you said you needed a pair of plain black shoes.” So, I bought the plain black ones, and took them home, and they were lovely, and they were just right for the upcoming conference, but I also couldn’t stop talking about the others. My husband finally said, “You should go back and buy them as well.” The next day, I was back in the Granville store, and went straight to the display model of the black and cream pair – and my face fell, because they were a size 9 (I’m a 6.5, and that’s what had been on display the previous day). The same sales guy saw me, disappeared into the back, and came out with the black and cream, in my size. He said, “I figured you’d be back, and I didn’t want there to be tears.”

What do Fluevogs mean to you?

For me they’re the perfect shoe – a way to make an ordinary outfit just a bit unusual, the kind of shoe that is memorable, in a good way. I often find myself in conversation with strangers when I wear a pair – people will stop me on the street to compliment the shoes, or ask where I got them. I like that they’re from Vancouver – the local angle is very appealing.

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

Happy!

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

I think I just bought pair number 20 – silver Mission Katie lace-up wedge boots. Both my (now adult) children have several pairs too – I got them hooked early!

Photos courtesy of Siân Echard

Photos courtesy of Siân Echard

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