When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they?

It was in ’96 or ‘97 and they were a pair of Oxblood/Burgundy 7th Heaven Derby Swirl boots. I loved those boots. I wore them everywhere for years until they just couldn’t be repaired anymore and I had to let them go.

What do Fluevogs mean to you?

They are like a breath of fresh air and a bit of sunshine. They are also a reminder that we don’t have to do things in a particular way just because that’s the way things have been done in the past. “Yes. Go ahead. Try it. Do more. What are you waiting for?” they say to me.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

It’s a bit like being in a not-so-secret club where you get comments/compliments on your footwear at random times from the nicest people. I’m also a bit amazed when I spot a pair in the wild in other countries and I feel compelled to say ‘Hi’, or at least give an involuntary guy nod to whoever is wearing them.

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

They are like a superhero cape, especially in Vancouver in the winter. Whenever I put a pair on, I’m ready for anything the city has to offer.

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

14. Which is both fantastic and a little worrying.

What is your favourite Fluevog? Why?

It changes, but I always love putting on a pair of Oxblood Derby Swirl boots. I can wear them with pretty much anything and in any situation: casual, formal, pub, wedding, job interview, on the motorbike or just waking around the city.

 

When did you get your first pair of Fluevogs? What were they?

It was in ’96 or ‘97 and they were a pair of Oxblood/Burgundy 7th Heaven Derby Swirl boots. I loved those boots. I wore them everywhere for years until they just couldn’t be repaired anymore and I had to let them go.

What do Fluevogs mean to you?

They are like a breath of fresh air and a bit of sunshine. They are also a reminder that we don’t have to do things in a particular way just because that’s the way things have been done in the past. “Yes. Go ahead. Try it. Do more. What are you waiting for?” they say to me.

Any interesting stories behind your Fluevogs?

It’s a bit like being in a not-so-secret club where you get comments/compliments on your footwear at random times from the nicest people. I’m also a bit amazed when I spot a pair in the wild in other countries and I feel compelled to say ‘Hi’, or at least give an involuntary guy nod to whoever is wearing them.

How do you feel when you wear your Fluevogs?

They are like a superhero cape, especially in Vancouver in the winter. Whenever I put a pair on, I’m ready for anything the city has to offer.

Can you tell us how many pairs you own?

14. Which is both fantastic and a little worrying.

What is your favourite Fluevog? Why?

It changes, but I always love putting on a pair of Oxblood Derby Swirl boots. I can wear them with pretty much anything and in any situation: casual, formal, pub, wedding, job interview, on the motorbike or just waking around the city.

In this two-part series, we compile images of winter activities and attractions from Open Collections. You can view Part I here.

Winter destinations

Banff National Park is a signature travel destination both in summer and winter. This menu from the Canadian Pacific Railway in the Chung Collection advertises winter sports in Banff on the cover.

Winter sports at Banff, Jun 29, 1928

Be sure to check out Lake Louise. This scenic lake is especially nice in the snow.

[Lake Louise], [between 1925 and 1935?]

Lake Louise, [between 1910 and 1919?]

Home of the Quebec Winter Carnival, Quebec City is known for its European feel. This pamphlet from the Chung Collection profiles the picturesque city in summer and winter.

Quebec: summer and winter, 1924

Quebec: summer and winter, 1897, p. 19

This Canadian Pacific Railway Company pamphlet promotes winter sports in Quebec City:

Chateau Frontenac: the wintersport capital of wintersport land, 1924

Located to the north-east of Quebec City, Montmorency Falls are also a must-see.

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884, p. 144

These two illustrations depict Niagara Falls in winter:

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 8

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 349

Montreal also had winter carnivals in the 1880s (Source: Wikipedia). These carnivals featured Ice Palaces, which were described in an illustrated book:

In the evening of the inauguration of the Ice Palace, everybody came to Dominion Square, where there was every sort of light but sunlight. The Ice Palace looked like glass; and I never saw anything so beautiful as when they burned blue, green, crimson and purple fires inside.

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p.253

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 246

Canada: a memorial volume. General reference book on Canada; describing the dominion at large, and its various provinces and territories; with statistics relating to its commerce and the development of its resources. Maps and illustrations, 1889, p. 222

We hope you have a warm and wonderful holiday season!

Fish Physiology series co-editors Drs. Colin Brauner and Anthony Farrell.

When Fish Physiology was founded in 1969 by UBC Zoology faculty members Drs. William S. Hoar and David J. Randall, there was no intention of continuing the series beyond six volumes. 50 years and 37 titled volumes later, the peer-reviewed monographic series is regarded as the leader in the field of fish physiology and a must-read for anyone interested in this domain, from senior undergraduate researchers through to mainstream university, government and industry employees.

The series is a frequently used resource at UBC Library and continues to be shepherded by UBC faculty members, Drs. Anthony Farrell and Colin Brauner, who were both graduate students of David Randall and have carried the successful series forward as co-editors, with Farrell joining in 1992 and Brauner in 2004.

A unique approach to integration and synthesis

Fish Physiology is unique in that its individual volumes have little in common except for publisher imposed length and general structure, with each volume representing the views of individual specialists on a particular subject. This thematic approach was taken very deliberately, explains Dr. Farrell, “We look at developments in the field and ask ‘What do we need to tell our colleagues?’. Over time, the series has morphed from being an encyclopedic resource about fish to a more applied and functional one, delving into interactions with the environment.” Among the subjects that have been discussed in Fish Physiology: Biology of Stress in Fish, Hypoxia (Oxygen deficiency), Organic Chemical Toxicology of Fishes and in the most recent volume, the effects of Carbon Dioxide.

Once a topic is established, the series editors bring on guest editors who are widely acknowledged as world leaders in their respective areas of expertise, enabling each volume to bring together intellectual contributions from the very best authors for the selected topic. “Beyond quality control, what Colin and I are most focused on is integration and synthesis” says Dr. Farrell, “What we try and do in a volume is say ‘Here is the big picture on this topic, here’s the supporting data from the thesis we are presenting and if you want to dig any deeper, here are the references… thereby allowing readers to move on to that next level of information gathering.’”

Fish Physiology series co-editors Drs. Colin Brauner and Anthony Farrell with Science Librarian Sally Taylor.

A leading resource in the field

“The series is available in print and online, and is a heavily-used and cited resource,” says Sally Taylor, Science Librarian at Woodward Library. “There are more than 200 chapter downloads per year from the UBC community alone.” Articles in Fish Physiology are often cited more than primary publications, making it the primary medium that authors in the field aspire to publish in. “The series has come to have such a legacy and prestige that we are finding that people are very excited to be asked to serve as guest editors or contributors,” says Dr. Brauner.

In 2020, Dr. Farrell plans to retire and a new series co-editor will join Dr. Brauner, UBC alumnus Dr. Erika Eliason, Assistant Professor of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who is highly respected in her field. Dr. Eliason is the first female editor for the series in its 50-year history.

Farrell and Brauner are optimistic about the future of the publication beyond their tenure. Says Brauner, “We know we have found the right person for the task.”

 Access Fish Physiology in UBC Library’s collections.

 

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to create and deliver responsive collections.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

Woodward Library entrance

 

The Woodward Library will undergo scheduled maintenance on Saturday January 4 and Sunday, January 5, 2020. 

The Library will reopen at 8 a.m. on Monday, January 6, 2020.

Please refer to the Library Hours and Locations to find additional study spaces across campus.

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K129 .C66 2019
Darryl Cooke, To Inovate Or Not to Inovate: A Blueprint for the Law Firm of the Future (Woking: Globe Law and Business, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K4240 .L39 2019
Christian Delage, Peter Goodrich & Marco Wan, eds., Law and New Media: West of Everything (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: K3247 .U5 2018
Jessie Hohmann & Marc Weller, eds., The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: A Commentary (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD921 .S27 2019
Colin Sara & Daniel Dovar, Boundaries and Easements, 7th ed. (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KD1578 .E558 2019
Nelson Enonchong, Duress, Undue Influence and Unconscionable Dealing, 3rd ed. (London: Thomson Reuters, trading as Sweet & Maxwell, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE1237 .B78 2019
Christopher J. Bruce, Kelly A. Rathje & Laura J. Weir, Assessment of Personal Injury Damages (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KE4430 .S57 2019
Nicholas Shrubsole, What Has No Place, Remains: The Challenges for Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada Today (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019).
Online access: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=10066127

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KF5605 .G58 2019
Robert L. Glicksman, Modern Public Land Law in a Nutshell, 5th ed. (St. Paul: West Academic Publishing, 2019).

LAW LIBRARY level 3: KJE5461 .N36 2018
Caroline Naômé, Appeals before the Court of Justice of the European Union (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018).

A selection of makerspace kits are available to be booked in advance so that students may plan to use them during their practicum visits. Students may reserve makerspace kits by following the instructions below. Please note that some of the kit components vary slightly. Be sure to review the components of the kit you are interested in booking.

 

When she’s not working as a Communications Coordinator for the Faculty of Science at UBC, you can find Silvia Moreno-Garcia writing, whether its writing book reviews for NPR or her column with The Washington Post or working on material of her own. The UBC alumnus’ fourth novel, Gods of Jade and Shadow, was published by Penguin Random House in August 2019 and was named one the best books of 2019 by NPR, The New York Public LibraryBookRiot and Tordotcom. In this dark, one-of-a-kind fairy tale inspired by Mexican folklore, the Mayan god of death sends a young woman on a harrowing, life-changing journey.

We spoke with Silvia about her new book, how she approaches her research and her love of interlibrary loans!

Tell us about Gods of Jade and Shadow and how it came about.

Gods of Jade and Shadow is a fantasy novel that takes place in Mexico in the 1920s. A young woman releases a Maya god of death from his prison and must help him retake his throne. It’s a quest story that took a long time to gestate and it’s my fourth novel.

Can you shed some light on your writing process? Do you do your research first, then write?

Generally, yes, because I’m doing a lot of historical research – at least that’s been the case with the last couple of books I’ve worked on. So I’ll have to page through books and papers for a few months before I can feel confident enough to start writing. But things always change. There’s a skeletal frame and I may fill some holes while I’m doing the work. Research might not end until the first draft is done and run in parallel if I need it.  

How did you do research for the book? Did UBC Library’s resources inform your work in any way?

I use UBC Library’s InterLibrary Loan service quite a bit. Often the Mexican books I need are not here but they can be obtained by getting them from universities in California that have extensive Mexican and Latin American collections. I also use the online databases frequently to look at journal articles, anything from codices to Mayan glyphs. The hardest thing to find are newspaper articles from certain time periods, pre-internet. It’s relatively easy to get newspaper stories from the 20s and 30s – you can look at the archives of the New York Times, for example – but for Mexican newspapers it can be nearly impossible. The 60s-70s is like a black hole.

I also like finding weird books at random. You never quite know what might be on the shelves of a library, especially when it comes to really old books.

What are you reading right now?

That changes like the tide because I review books for NPR and have a column with The Washington Post. So the thing I’m reading for review right now is Labyrinth by Burhan Sönmez, translated by Umit Hussein, which is about a musician who loses his memory and which the publisher calls “Borgesian.” For my own pleasure I’m reading James Crumley’s The Last Good Kiss, a 1970s  hard-boiled noir about a private investigator trying to find a missing man and going from seedy location to seedy location in his quest.

Follow Silvia’s writing on her website.

Click on the book cover to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

Language assessment : principles and classroom practices / H. Douglas Brown ; Priyanvada Abeywickrama.

P53.4 .B76 2019

What really works with universal design for learning / editors, Wendy W. Murawski, Kathy Lynn Scott.

LC1201 .W43 2019

Start with the heart : igniting hope in schools through social and emotional learning / Michelle L. Trujillo.

LB1072 .T78 2019

Step into STEAM : your standards-based action plan for deepening mathematics and science learning, grades K-5 / Sarah B. Bush, Kristin L. Cook

QA135.6 .B88 2019

 

Click on the book cover to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

Share your smile: : Raina’s guide to telling your own story / Raina Telgemeier.

PN159 .T45 2019

The good egg / Jory John ; illustrations by Pete Oswald.

PZ7 .J62168 Gd 2019

We are okay : a novel / by Nina LaCour.

PZ7 .L13577 Wr 2019

Temporarily shelved at Education Library reserve

Monday’s not coming / a novel by Tiffany D. Jackson.

PZ7.1 .J353 Mn 2019

 

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