Our new Collection Spotlight is up. Pink Shirt Anti-Bullying Day is February 26, 2020.  The theme this year is ‘Lift Each Other Up.’

https://www.pinkshirtday.ca/lift-each-other-up

On February 11, UBC Library hosted a one-day workshop by renowned Japanese conservator Kazunori Oryū, who presented on Japanese scroll mounting and bookbinding in conservation. More than forty participants were in attendance, including local and out-of-town conservators, paper and print artists, members of Japanese heritage and cultural organizations, and UBC students, alumni, faculty, and staff.

In the workshop, Mr. Oryū not only outlined the basics of the structures and aesthetics of Japanese heritage materials as related to conservation, but also reported on his involvement as a technical supervisor in the multi-year rescue efforts for paper-based resources damaged during last October’s typhoon at the Kawasaki City Museum. Mr. Oryū also provided step-by-step demonstrations of how to handle heritage materials properly, and gave detailed explanations about preservation and conservation processes and techniques, using sample materials.

In the words of a participant, “thank you… for offering this fascinating event and for opening it up to the conservation community. Opportunities like this are rare.”

Mr. Oryū also met with library employees the following day to examine items from UBC Library’s own Japanese rare collections. He provided invaluable guidance with regards to the ongoing conservation needs of the items that were shown, and also espoused general strategies that could be used to care for the materials.

We are grateful to Mr. Oryū for sharing his time and expertise, and to Sheldon Armstrong, AUL Collections, for sponsoring this event.

 

SOUTH ASIAN

PK2659 B46 C58 2019
Chitti gufa te maulsari : a novel / by Jasbir Bhullar

PK2659 R385 B34 2019
Baaghi Sarabha : a Punjabi play / by Gurpreet Singh Ratol

PK2659 S295 M67 2019
Moraan Ranjit Singh / by Swarn Singh

PK2659 S837 M36 2019
Mann de moti : short stories / by Surinder Deep

PQ2605 A37 C4166
Patan : a novel / translated by Vipan Gill


CHINESE

DS734.7 Z433587 2018
西史东渐与中国史学演进 (1840-1927) / 赵少峰著

DS740.5 K6 L538 2019
清代中朝边界史探研 : 结合实地踏查的研究 / 李花子著

DS747.15 Z4 2019
楚国八百年 / 张俊纶著

DS755 J53 2019
摩登中华 : 从帝国到民国 / 贾葭著

DS777.43 D464 2019
新文化运动百年祭 / 邓秉元著


JAPANESE

DS894.465 S255 2019
戦国時代の終焉 : 「北条の夢」と秀吉の天下統一 / 齋藤慎一

HT653 J3 M66 2019
武士の起源を解きあかす : 混血する古代, 創発される中世 / 桃崎有一郎

ND1059 A49 S55 2019
松と富士 : 穴山勝堂伝 : 「新興大和絵会」から「日本画院」へ / 標宣男

PL650 S55 2018
映画字幕の翻訳学 : 日本映画と英語字幕 / 篠原有子著

PL726.2 K89 2019
平安朝文学論 : 表象と強度 / 葛綿正一

PL728.81185 U44 2019
六条藤家歌学書の生成と伝流 / 梅田径著

PN1993.5 J3 S85 2019
スクリーン・スタディーズ : デジタル時代の映像, メディア経験 / 光岡寿郎 ; 大久保遼編

PN2924.5 N6 M587 2019
歌舞能の系譜 : 世阿弥から禅竹へ / 三宅晶子


KOREAN

DS916 K524 2019
통사 와 혈사 로 읽는 한국 현대사 : 3.1 혁명 에서 남북 정상 회담 까지, 피 와 눈물 의 현대사 100년 / 김 삼웅 지음

DS917.444 A1875 2019
2019-2029 시나리오 한반도 / 모자이크 코리아 지음 ; 김 동재 (연세대 국제학 대학원 교수) 감수

E184 K6 C458164 2019
미주 한인사 / 장 태한, 캐롤 박 지음 ; 장 태한, 윤 지아 옮김

HN730.5 Z9 M84884 2019
다문화 사회 의 다층성 : 인종적 다양성 을 둘러싼 정책적 편입 과 배제 / 원 숙연 지음

JC311 C536 2019
보수 혁명론 : 한민족 을 노리는 “죽음 의 상인들” / 정 상모 지음

PL958.6 Y4535 2019
식민지 문학 읽기 : 일본 15년 전쟁기 / 이 행선 지음

PL961.15 S66 2019
조선 후기 시가 의 성격 과 표현 / 손 정인

The third Monday of February is Family Day in British Columbia. We hope you enjoyed quality time with your loved ones. In celebration of Family Day, we are sharing some of our favourite family albums from the Open Collections.

The MacLachlan Clan – By Bob, [1865-1945?]

This is a family album put together by Bob MacLachlan. The family moved from Edinburgh, Scotland to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and then finally to Vancouver, BC. The photos encompass all of these locations. It is predominantly photos of the family, but there are also drawings, cards, news clippings, as well as other ephemera pasted in.

The Maclachlan Clan, [between 1935 and 1945?]

This is the cover page for the album. Small clippings of portrait photos of the family members are attached onto the hand-drawn monkeys.

[Family photo], [between 1920 and 1940?]

[Tom Maclachlan with baby], [between 1935 and 1945?]

 

[Possible Murray Family Photo Album #2], [1890?]-1959

This is an album of family portraits, possibly from the Murray family of Vancouver. There are also some photos tucked in the back from a much later date. There are also 8 negatives in an envelope addressed to “Mr. Unger.”

[Family portrait], [between 1920 and 1930?]

[Group portrait], [between 1920 and 1930?]


[Robert Sinclair’s Photo Album], [1900-1923?]

The album is from a man named Robert Sinclair. The photos are predominantly of family snapshots, and images from around their rural home in BC. There are also some of farming and logging, and a few of different cities and locales throughout BC. Some of the photos are captioned, but none are dated. The album is secured with a metal clasp and is in quite good condition, as are the photos.

[Older man playing with baby], [between 1910 and 1920?]

[Family picnicking], [between 1910 and 1920?]

Adam and Eve, also Flossy, [between 1910 and 1920?]

 

[Unknown Family Photo Album], [1900-1925?]

This family photo album, possibly from a Vancouver family, has an emphasis on children and dogs. Many photos have others tucked in behind them. The photos and the album are still in fairly good shape.

[Small child with dog], [between 1900 and 1910?]

[Man and infant playing with puppies], [between 1915 and 1925?]

[Two children sitting in grass], [between 1900 and 1910?]

 

[Possible Murray Family Photo Album], [1920-1930?]

This is an album of predominantly landscape photographs from throughout BC, as well as a few in Vancouver, including some of ships in the harbour. In the back after a number of blank pages are also some family snapshots. Many of the photos are captioned in fading pencil. The album may have belonged to a member of Kathleen Murray’s family.

[Portrait of group of women and children], [between 1920 and 1930?]

[Couple on zip line swing], [between 1920 and 1930?]

 

[Vancouver Family Photo Album], [1925-1950?]

This album is from a Vancouver family, documenting their travels throughout BC and the United States as well as life in Vancouver, including the royal visit of 1939. The pages are beginning to tear out of the album, but the photos are still in relatively good shape (with some fading).

[Woman helping a baby walk], 1933

[Portrait of two small children], 1933

 

We hope you enjoyed this post! To view more family photographs from the 1850s to the 1950s, please check out the Chung Collection and the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs.

February is Black History Month in Canada, the US, the UK, Germany, and the Netherlands. During this month, we recognize the legacy, achievements, and struggles that Black People have faced and accomplished. The bird in the above picture is the Sankofa bird, with it’s feet forward, head turned backward, it reflects on the past to build a successful future, and is the symbol of Black History Month in Canada this year. We have chosen books and other materials from our collection to celebrate this month with the rest of Canada. Be sure to check out our display in the branch! And remember, we are open normal hours during Reading Week if you are still around campus.

Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: the African Diaspora in Indian Country edited by Tiya Miles and Sharon P. Holland looks at historical studies and cultural expressions between blacks and Indigenous in Native communities to illustrates the many forms of expression that has formed through their intertwined history.

IndiVisible : African-Native American Lives in the Americas edited by Gabrielle Tayac is a collection of 27 essays that work to provide multiple viewpoints of the complex personal histories of people with dual heritage, trying to find acceptance within their own communities.

Proudly Red and Black : Stories of African and Native Americans by William Loren Katz and Paula A. Franklin, written for younger readers, is an in-depth look of six people who have both African and Indigenous heritage, including a US senator, a scuplter, and a colonial trader.

Untold Stories: Civil Rights, Libraries, and Black Librarianship edited by John Mark Tucker is composed of 15 articles that fall under three themes: Legacies of Black Librarianship, Chronicles from the Civil Rights Movement, & Resources for Library Personnel, Services and Collections.

American Red & Black: Stories of Afro-Native Identity directed by Alicia Woods is an award winning intimate look at 6 Afro-native Americans from across the U.S as their reflect on their experience as a part of two different communities of colour.

Oklahoma: Black Cherokees edited by Ty Wilson & Karen Coody Cooper looks at the ways the Cherokee assimilated into American society during the 1800s including accommodating the institutional slavery of black people and how this decision still impacts people today.

Native Land Talk: Indigenous and Arrivant Rights Theories by Yael Ben-Zvi draws on different types of texts to illustrate the ways that Indigenous and African-descended slaves explained their own views of freedom in the 18th and 19th century, and how their views drew off of the ways settlers threw off British rule in the American Colonies.  This books makes the case for how rights were constructed differently depending on if it existed in American, African, or English space, and explains the historical obstacles to solidarity between Indigenous and African American struggles.

Race and Racialization: Essential Readings edited by Tania Das Gupta, Carl E. James, Chris Andersen, Grace-Edward Galabuzi, and Roger C.A. Maaka draws a number of academic thinkers and writers to explore the themes of ethnocentrism, cultural genocide, conquest and colonization, disease and pandemics, slavery, the social construction of racism, and the failures of integration in short essays.

There’s Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous and Black Communities by Ingrid R.G. Waldron examines the legacy that environmental racism has in Indigenous and Black communities in Canada, focusing primarily on Nova Scotia, and uses settler colonialism as the overarching theory to explain how environmental racism works as erasure in white-settler society.

American Cowboys written, produced and directed by Cedric Wildbill and Tania Wildbill shows the legacy of Indigenous and Black cowboys in the American West dating back to the 1900s where the cowboy winners broke the colour barrier in rodeo. This documentary includes a 1911 silent film!

Racism and Anti-Racism in Canada edited by David Este, Liza Lorenzetti, & Christa Sato is a introductory  reader that illustrates the many ways that racism and discrimination has impacted Canadian society, with writers from diverse backgrounds that reflect the people making up Canadian society.

Rumble: the Indians Who Rocked the World directed by Catherine Bainbridge is a library favourite that focuses on the Indigenous and Afro-Indigenous people who shaped music to where it is today.

Kat McGrath Library employee profile

Before starting her career in librarianship, Kat pursued her dream to live self-sufficiently in the country. With some friends, Kat built a solar heated house in an agricultural area of Pitt Meadows, had land with animals and often worked in libraries. “I found myself going back to libraries and realized that working with library people felt really good. I enjoy being around curious people who have an interest in something and want to solve a problem.”

After graduating from library school and working as a professional librarian for the past 30 years, Kat’s librarianship career evolved to her becoming UBC Library’s current Renewals and Collections Librarian. “One of the cool things about Collections Services is that we support all parts of the library. All formats. All languages. All disciplines. We really get exposed to the breadth of what the library has to offer.”

With the growing needs of library users, Kat’s day-to-day involves enhancing the experience and accessibility of UBC’s electronic and print collections: “The exciting aspect about the online environment is that it supports discovery, as well as providing information and knowledge to our users 24/7 from wherever they might be – on campus, at home or in the field.  Finding something online might not be the end, in fact it’s often just the beginning,” she says. “Initially, eResources were dominant in Science, Technology and Medicine fields, but now it’s cross-disciplinary. Our Asian Library, for example, is growing its ebook and ejournal collections.  We’re also expanding our streaming media collections, which are popular in online courses; and responding to increasing demand for datasets and tools to support digital scholarship.”

Talking about her own growth, Kat shares opportunities she’s been given throughout her library career. Aside from a range of responsibilities within the library, Kat recalls being able to work within local and international organizations and committees. With a smile, she reminisces about being seconded to Southeast Asia and later immersing herself in libraries of the Middle East during an unpaid leave saying, “I’ve been very fortunate, and I’m grateful for that.”

When asked about her favourite UBC Library memory, she looks up and laughs: “I was the coordinator for an academic library and publisher conference held at UBC in the early 90s – pre-Olympics. Many people coming from the United States and United Kingdom hadn’t been to Canada before. They were blown away by the campus, the views and the salmon barbeque at the Museum of Anthropology. It was a really proud moment for me to share the library and campus with people.”

Staying rooted in nature, Kat is excited about upcoming Library Climate Action Initiative seminars and more outdoor activities with her partner: “For Canada’s 150, I took up bird watching. My partner and I set a goal to identify 150 species in Canada that year, which we managed to do. That pursuit has been especially life changing.”

Discover more about UBC Library Collections by visiting our website.

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