From “Volʹga” (PZ63.7 .V65 1904)

Happy Friday, and welcome back for this week’s Friday fairy tales blog post!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

From “A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys” (PZ6 1892 .H3)

We hope you enjoy these charming fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part XI:

With the help of local BC business librarians, we have created a new page in our Business Basics section titled COVID-19 & Business Research to help you find credible business information during these uncertain and rapidly changing times. We have listed freely available public resources, as well as databases that may be licensed through local libraries, including here at UBC Library. You will find curated content on the following categories:

  • Key Business Research Starting Places

    Features go-to resources and services that aggregate information about COVID-19 and business.

  • Funding Resources

    An accessible list of various financial resources that have been made available for business during this crisis.

  • Industry Databases with Licensed & Freely Available Content

    A list of databases and tools that are available to the public, as well as through licensed subscriptions. These resources can help you research impacts of the pandemic on industries, consumers and the Canadian economy.

  • Legal Resources

    A variety of legal resources including news, legal updates and Q&As related to COVID-19.

  • Free Educational Opportunities & Professional Development Opportunities

    Free webinars and online courses that business schools have made available in response to the pandemic.

We hope this resource guide is useful to the BC small business community. We invite your comments below to share any questions, feedback or resources with us.

SBA Program News

With the help of local BC business librarians, we have created a new page in our Business Basics section titled COVID-19 & Business Research to help you find credible business information during these uncertain and rapidly changing times. We have listed freely available public resources, as well as databases that may be licensed through local libraries, including here at UBC Library. You will find curated content on the following categories:

  • Key Business Research Starting Places

    Features go-to resources and services that aggregate information about COVID-19 and business.

  • Funding Resources

    An accessible list of various financial resources that have been made available for business during this crisis.

  • Industry Databases with Licensed & Freely Available Content

    A list of databases and tools that are available to the public, as well as through licensed subscriptions. These resources can help you research impacts of the pandemic on industries, consumers and the Canadian economy.

  • Legal Resources

    A variety of legal resources including news, legal updates and Q&As related to COVID-19.

  • Free Educational Opportunities & Professional Development Opportunities

    Free webinars and online courses that business schools have made available in response to the pandemic.

We hope this resource guide is useful to the BC small business community. We invite your comments below to share any questions, feedback or resources with us.

SBA Program News

Issue Resolved

There is an issue affecting certain Elsevier ScienceDirect journals.
While green ‘Full-Text Access’ icons may be displaying next to an article, the PDF Download functionality isn’t working correctly, and all users are confronted with a paywall. The Elsevier team is working on this issue and we hope to have an update for you soon.

A list of the known affected titles is below. Should you come across any other titles with this same issue, please report them to eResources Help.

Elsevier has a temporary workaround, in case any researchers need immediate access to an article.
Instead of clicking the “Download PDF” button, check the box next to the article and then select “Download selected articles”. That will give the option to open a zip file and then access the article.

Titles known to be affected:
* Science of the Total Environment
* Midwifery
* Journal of Molecular Biology

This research guide is intended for students, faculty, and researchers to use and locate resources to help their understanding of the complexities surrounding Indigenous spatial and land based activism. It focuses specifically on strategies for researching contemporary Indigenous struggles over spatial justice. Because grassroots struggles for justice are not always well represented within academic literature, this guide provides additional research strategies, including tips for navigating news and social media.

Some highlights from the new guide includes:

And more lists of books, theses, scholarly articles and other helpful resources on this topic!

Please feel free to email us any feedback on the new research guide or any questions about this topic to xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca

Over the past two months, UBC Library has pumped up the volume of streaming and other online content. Here are some new additions: OntheBoards.TV (New!) is a portal for viewing full-length, high-quality films of performance works by contemporary artists in dance, theater, music and other forms.  Funded by UBC Okanagan. Audio Cine Films Digital Campus is […]

From “Mopsa, the Fairy” (PZ6 1910 I533)

We’re glad to have you back for our new tradition on the RBSC blog: Friday fairy tales!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

From “The Three Little Kittens” (PZ4.9.B2247 Th 1862)

We hope you enjoy these charming fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part X:

 

 

WENDY TRAAS AS INTERIM HEAD, EDUCATION LIBRARY

Peggy Lunn has resigned from her position as Head of the Education Library. Wendy Traas is acting as Interim Head.

MANAGING RESEARCH DATA

Are you curious about how to comply with Tri-Agency funding requirements for research data? The Library can help with Data Management Planning and Open Access compliance via cIRcle, UBC’s Institutional Repository.

Contact your liaison librarian for more help:
Emily Fornwald emily.fornwald@ubc.ca
Wendy Traas wendy.traas@ubc.ca

You can also visit the UBC Library Research Data Management guide, which includes tools such as the DMP Assistant, which helps researchers create data management plans for Canadian funders: https://researchdata.library.ubc.ca/

LIBRARY POLICIES AMID COVID-19

All UBC Library branches remain closed until further notice with librarians and library staff working remotely. The library continues to provide access to electronic resources and librarian support for research, teaching and learning.

You can stay up to date with the Library’s services and resources at: https://services.library.ubc.ca/covid-19-response

Please continue to reach out to your liaison librarians or to the Education Library’s general email ed.lib@ubc.ca with any questions, or if you would like to discuss librarian support for research and instruction at this time. We will also continue sharing updates and resources through Twitter @UBCEdLib

UBC LIBRARIANS RECOMMEND:
Ideas for your next read, watch or listen from our online collections

In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, we have compiled recommendations from a handful of UBC librarians for you to watch, read, and listen from home. From archived films to Indigenous literature and family-friendly activities, all these resources can be found in UBC Library’s online collections.
https://go.library.ubc.ca/ksg42g

UBC Education Library
2125 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC
V6T 1Z4

Email: ed.lib@ubc.ca
Circulation Desk: 604-822-5381
Web: education.library.ubc.ca

   

 

UBC Library users can now benefit from unlimited access to Covidence, a web-based systematic review management software platform. With a new institutional subscription to Covidence, the library has made it possible for faculty, staff and student researchers at UBC to significantly cut down on the time it takes to complete a systematic or other comprehensive literature review.

In a systematic review, researchers set out to address a clearly defined question by consolidating all available evidence. The process involves multiple stages, including preparing the research question; searching for studies that relate to the question; screening those studies to see how well they match the question and assessing the quality of the studies; extracting the data; analyzing and synthesizing the results; and reporting on the findings.

Typically, systematic reviews will include published studies from electronic databases, as well as unpublished research and what’s commonly known as ‘grey literature,’ which are non-commercially published works like government reports, conference presentations and industry whitepapers. Sorting through the vast plethora of studies that are found during the search phase of a systematic review can be a daunting task. Not surprisingly, this type of review is time intensive, sometimes taking up to 18 months or longer to complete. Covidence can help speed up the process by streamlining citation screening, full-text review, risk of bias assessments, quality appraisal and data extraction. The software can also be useful in other types of comprehensive literature reviews, such as scoping reviews.

Screenshot of Covidence title and abstract screening page.

The systematic review methodology first started appearing in medical research publications during the 1970s and 1980s, gaining popularity into the 1990s as use became widespread across the health sciences. Since then, the methodology has found a place in many other fields including education, social sciences, psychology, forestry, engineering and more.

In the midst of the current COVID-19 situation, many research projects are being put on hold or delayed as UBC labs remain closed and fieldwork is not possible because of the need for physical distancing. “Researchers in healthcare are now focussing on systematic reviews or other knowledge synthesis projects,” notes Charlotte Beck, Reference Librarian at UBC’s Woodward Library and an administrator for UBC Library’s Covidence account. Beck says students who were set to embark on practica are bringing their Capstone projects forward this summer and revising their research topics accordingly. With this new tool available to all UBC faculty, staff and students, the review process can not only be accelerated, but the overall experience can be improved, particularly for users undertaking their very first review.

Get started by connecting to Covidence, or visit the library website for more information.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to advance research, learning and scholarship.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

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