UBC Library’s Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) has been busy creating new and innovative resources for UBC students to access online. Located in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, the Chapman Learning Commons puts an emphasis on peer-led, student-driven initiatives and shared-decision making. Through their programs and services, they strive to enrich academic support and enhance the experience of all UBC students.

Get the support you need through one of the following new services.

Practice for your online exams

With exam time fast approaching, the CLC has released a new self-enrollment course for UBC students who want to practice taking different types of online exams. The CLC’s Exam Prep Canvas Course is available to all students through self-enrollment through Canvas.

Become familiar with Proctorio, Lockdown Browser, Webwork and more to feel confident with online exam technology, just in time for the start of exams. CLC Online Assistants will also be available to help with pre-exam tech checks and troubleshooting.

Enroll for the course on Canvas.

Get help with your academic support questions

The CLC Online Assistants are trained peers ready to help answer student questions about academic support, learning technologies and online exams (including Canvas, Collaborate Ultra, Zoom, and more). They are available Monday-Friday 9am-5pm through email and video chat.

Reach out with your questions.

Register for Learning Skills Workshops

In June, the CLC launched a new online workshop series for students that offers skills training for the online learning environment. The series covers topics like finding work-life balance while remote learning, giving group presentations online, time management best practices, and developing online communication skills.

New dates are being added throughout the summer, so check back often.

Sign up for a workshop.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to inspire with innovative spaces and services.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

Get to Know Mayu Ishida, Reference Librarian graphic

With the changing needs of library users during this unprecedented time, Mayu Ishida, Reference Librarian at UBC’s Woodward Library, continues to provide services and support to students, faculty and staff in the biological sciences, computer sciences, statistics and mathematics. As a proud graduate of UBC iSchool, Mayu has been contributing towards the learning and research advancement of her alma mater: “I’m a science librarian, so I have the opportunity to work in different aspects of the library and it’s been a very rewarding experience”.

When asked about what keeps her inspired, she answers: “I’m inspired by how UBC Library employees are adapting to our patrons’ information needs during the COVID-19 outbreak. We try to provide e-books and other online alternatives to print materials whenever possible. We continue providing reference services, consults, and workshops online. We contribute to AskAway, the province-wide virtual reference service, and have signed up for extra AskAway shifts since the usage of the service is increasing. I feel fortunate to be able to participate in these efforts”.

Thinking about her current remote working set-up, Mayu smiles. “I appreciate my team’s camaraderie. Recently, we had a new colleague who joined us and another colleague who returned from her leave. We greeted these two colleagues by setting our Zoom virtual backgrounds to a welcome banner that my colleague, Eleri, created specifically for this occasion,” she laughs.

On her time off, Mayu finds relaxation in knitting. “I like trying different types of yarn that I haven’t tried before. I just like all the different textures and colours and different materials that yarn is made of,” she explains. “Right now, I’m trying lacey yarn and I’m making a scarf with it. It’s taking a long time, but it’s rewarding”.

As Mayu reminisces about her own experience being welcomed to UBC Library, she recalls all the support she received throughout her career. As a new hire, Mayu would often meet with fellow new librarians and archivists over coffee, tea, and shared experiences. She would also connect with more tenured librarians, who guided her and offered perspectives. “That was a nice support group and I was fortunate to be matched with two mentors when I started – one from my branch and another from a different branch of the library,” she explains.

At this point in her career, Mayu feels fortunate that she has opportunities to foster rich learning experiences by mentoring student librarians working for Woodward Library. She makes it a point to impart time-tested advice that was given to her when she was a student librarian herself: “They have the freedom to explore the program, to build their CV, but also to get that well-rounded experience through experiential learning”.

Learn more about UBC Library’s online resources and how we’re supporting the UBC community during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Learn how Chapman Learning Commons Online Assistants can provide help over email and video chat.

“The Fairy Tales of Science” ( PZ6 1866 .B76)

Thank you for joining us for this week’s Friday fairy tales blog post!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’ve been excited to share over the past couple of months the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image”.

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit.

These two will likely be the last student assignment we’ll be sharing through the blog, and we hope you have enjoyed them as much as we have! Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students and stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

“The Bear’s Kingdom” (PZ6 1897 .R644)

Five fairy tale selections, part XII:

 

 

X̱wi7x̱wa Library and Education Library are pleased to present a virtual display of over 50 electronic picture books, graphic novels, fiction, non-fiction and biographies featuring Indigenous themes and authorship.

These Indigenous children’s literature titles were carefully compiled by the employees of X̱wi7x̱wa Library and are all available online at UBC Library.

Please click on the book cover or the title and then “Full Text Online” to access these eBooks.

 


7 Générations: Pierre (Volume 1, French Edition) by David A. Robertson (2013)
Graphic novel

 


7 Générations: Cicatrices (Volume 2, French Edition) by David A. Robertson (2013)
Graphic novel

 


A blanket of butterflies by Richard Van Camp  (2015)
Graphic novel

 


Catching spring by Sylvia Olsen (2004)
Juvenile fiction

 


Cloudwalker by Roy Henry Vickers  (2014)
Picture book

 


Comment la rivière Petitcodiac devint boueuse / Ta’n Tel-kisi-siskuapua’qsepp Petikodiac Sipu / How the Petitcodiac River became Muddy (French, Mi’kmaq and English) by Marguerite Maillet (2011)
Illustrated folklore

 


Death by dinosaur: A Sam Stellar mystery by Jacqueline Guest (2018)
Juvenile fiction

 


A different game by Sylvia Olsen (2010)
Juvenile fiction

 


Ends/begins by David A. Robertson (2010)
Graphic novel

 


The evolution of Alice by David A. Robertson (2014)
Juvenile fiction

 


Fatty legs: a true story by Christy Jordan-Fenton (2010)
Juvenile non-fiction

 


Ghost river by Tony Birch (2015)
Juvenile fiction

 


Ghosts by David A. Robertson (2019)
Juvenile fiction

 


The grizzly mother by Brett D. Huson (2019)
Picture book

 


Halfbreed by Maria Campbell (1982)
Biography

 


He who dreams by Melanie Florence (2017)
Juvenile fiction

 


Him standing by Richard Wagamese (2013)
Juvenile fiction

 


How things came to be: Inuit stories of creation by Rachel Qitsualik-Tinsley (2015)
Illustrated folklore

 


Kiss by kiss: Ocêtôwina: a counting book for families (Plains Cree and English) by Richard Van Camp (2018)
Picture book

 


Le roi de glace: Mkumiey eleke’wit = The ice king (French, Mi’kmaq and English) by Corine Gallant (2012)
Illustrated folklore

 


Little you: Kitapisîsisin (Bush Cree and English) by Richard Van Camp (2018)
Picture book

 


Little you: Anetséleh (South Slavey and English) by Richard Van Camp (2013)
Picture book

 


Little you: Nën Nechíle (Chipewyan and English) by Richard Van Camp (2013)
Picture book

 


Little you: Kîya-K’apisîsisîyân (Plains Cree and English) by Richard Van Camp (2018)
Picture book

 


May we have enough to share by Richard Van Camp (2019)
Picture book

 


Middle row by Sylvia Olsen, Sylvia (2008)
Juvenile fiction

 


Molly’s promise by Sylvia Olsen (2013)
Juvenile fiction

 


Monsters by David A. Robertson (2018)
Juvenile fiction

 


Murphy and Mousetrap by Sylvia Olsen (2005)
Juvenile fiction

 


My heart fills with happiness by Monique Gray Smith (2016)
Picture book

 


My heart fills with happiness / ni Mîyawâten Niteh Ohcih (Plains Cree Edition) by Monique Gray Smith (2018)
Picture book

 


Native American games and stories by James Bruchac (2000)
Juvenile non-fiction

 


The next sure thing by Richard Wagamese (2011)
Fiction

 


Nimoshom and his bus by Penny Thomas (2017)
Picture book

 


Not my girl by Christy Jordan-Fenton (2014)
Picture book

 


Pemmican wars (Vol 1: A girl called Echo) by Katherena Vermette (2017)
Graphic novel

 


The poet: Pauline Johnson by David A. Robertson (2014)
Graphic novel

 

Powwow counting in Cree by Penny Thomas (2013) **Coming Soon**
Picture book

 


The raven and the loon by Rachel and Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley (2014)
Picture book

 


The raven and the loon: Inuktitut language version (by Rachel and Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley (2013)
Picture book

 


Raven brings the light: A Northwest Coast legend by Roy Henry Vickers (2013)
Picture book

 


The rebel: Gabriel Dumont by David A. Robertson (2014)
Graphic novel

 


Scars by David A. Robertson (2010)
Graphic novel

 


Soapstone porcupine by Jeff Pinkney (2018)
Juvenile fiction

 


Sous la lune de corbeau (French) by David Bouchard (2016)
Picture book

 


Speaking our truth: a journey of reconciliation by Monique Gray Smith (2017)
Non-fiction

 


A stranger at home: a true story by Christy Jordan-Fenton (2011)
Biography

 


Strangers by David A. Robertson, David (2017)
Juvenile fiction

 


Sugar Falls: a Residential School Story by Robertson, David Alexander (2012)
Graphic novel

 


The pact by David A. Robertson (2011)
Graphic novel

 


Three feathers by Richard Van Camp (2015)
Graphic novel

 


The way of thorn and thunder: the Kynship chronicles by Daniel Heath Justice (2011)
Fiction

 


We sang you home by Richard Van Camp (2018)
Picture book

 


We sang you home: Ka kîweh nikâmôstamâtinân (Plains Cree and English) by Richard Van Camp (2018)
Picture book

 


Welcome song for baby: a lullaby for newborns by Richard Van Camp, Richard (2007)
Picture book

 


Welcome song for baby / ni Nikamon ‘Tawâw Nipepîmis’ (Plains Cree and English) by Richard Van Camp (2018)
Picture book

 


What the Elders Have Taught Us: Alaska Native Ways – Photography by Roy Corral. (2013)
Non-fiction

 


Yellow line by Sylvia Olsen (2005)
Juvenile fiction

 


You hold me up by Monique Gray Smith (2017)
Picture book

 


You hold me up /Ki Kîhcêyimin Mâna (Plains Cree and English) by Monique Gray Smith (2018)
Picture book

 

On June 3rd, 2019, The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls’s Final Report revealed that persistent and deliberate human and Indigenous rights violations and abuses are the root cause behind Canada’s staggering rates of violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA people. In honour of the women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people who continue to go missing and are murdered in Canada and the US, we have put together this list of online resources & books available either freely online or through your UBC CWL login.

Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

The Final Report is comprised of the truths of more than 2,380 family members, survivors of violence, experts and Knowledge Keepers shared over two years of cross-country public hearings and evidence gathering. It delivers 231 individual Calls for Justice directed at governments, institutions, social service providers, industries and all Canadians.

Violence against Indigenous Women: Literature, Activism, Resistance by Allison Hargreaves

Indigenous communities have been organizing against violence since newcomers first arrived, but the cases of missing and murdered womenhave only recently garnered broad public attention. Violence AgainstIndigenous Women joins the conversation by analyzing the socially interventionist work of Indigenous women poets, playwrights, filmmakers, and fiction-writers. Organized as a series of case studies that pair literary interventions with recent sites of activism and policy-critique, the book puts literature in dialogue with anti-violence debate to illuminate new pathways toward action.

Remembering Vancouver’s Disappeared Women: Settler Colonialism and the Difficulty of Inheritance by Amber Dean

In a work driven by the urgency of this ongoing crisis, which extends across the country, Amber Dean offers a timely, critical analysis of the public representations, memorials, and activist strategies that brought the story of Vancouver’s disappeared women to the attention of a wider public. Remembering Vancouver’s Disappeared Women traces “what lives on” from the violent loss of so many women from the same neighbourhood.

Stolen directed by Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs

For the size of their population, Aboriginal women in Canada account for an incredibly overrepresented percentage of missing persons and murder statistics. Sheena, a lost teenager, is placed in a girl’s home. Seemingly forgotten and yearning for a life of freedom, she runs away, only to be picked up by a dangerous stranger. The directorial debut by actor Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs is a sober commentary of missing Indigenous women.

this river directed by Erika MacPherson and Katherena Vermette

This short documentary offers an Indigenous perspective on the devastating experience of searching for a loved one who has disappeared. Volunteer activist Kyle Kematch and award-winning writer Katherena Vermette have both survived this heartbreak and share their histories with each other and the audience. While their stories are different, they both exemplify the beauty, grace, resilience, and activism born out of the need to do something.

For the 2017 pow wow, 17-year-old jingle dancer Tia Wood of Saddle Lake Cree Nation, Alberta was selected as Head Young Lady Dancer. She used that position, and the spotlight it provided in a spectacular way to bring attention to the nearly 1,000 missing and murdered indigenous women from both the United States and Canada.

Looking for more resources? Check out our MMIWG Research Guide updated regularly by our library staff.

In honour of National Indigenous History Month, UBC Education Library is highlighting 5 Indigenous eBook teacher resources available at UBC Library.  All of these professional teacher resources are available as “full text online” to our UBC users by clicking on the images or titles and then “online access” or “full text online” at the catalogue page.


Potlatch as pedagogy: learning through ceremony /Sara Florence Davidson and Robert Davidson

“Inspired by Haida ceremonial practice, father and daughter present a model for learning that is holistic, relational, practical, and continuous.”

 


Learning and teaching together: weaving indigenous ways of knowing into education
/ Michelle Tanaka.
“Tanaka recounts how pre-service teachers enrolled in a crosscultural course in British Columbia immersed themselves in indigenous ways of learning and teaching by working alongside indigenous wisdom keepers. Together, they transformed cedar bark, buckskin, and wool into a mural that tells stories about the land upon which the course took place. In the process, they discovered new ways of learning that support not only intellectual but also tactile, emotional, and spiritual forms of knowledge.”

 


Truth and indignation: Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools / Ronald Niezen.
“The original edition of Truth and Indignation offered the first close and critical assessment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) as it was unfolding. Niezen used testimonies, texts, and visual materials produced by the Commission as well as interviews with survivors, priests, and nuns to raise important questions about the TRC process. He asked what the TRC meant for reconciliation, transitional justice, and conceptions of traumatic memory.
In this updated edition, Niezen discusses the Final Report and Calls to Action bringing the book up to date and making it a valuable text for teaching about transitional justice, colonialism and redress, public anthropology, and human rights. Thoughtful, provocative, and uncompromising in the need to tell the “truth” as he sees it, Niezen offers an important contribution to understanding truth and reconciliation processes in general, and the Canadian experience in particular.”

 


Speaking our truth: a journey of reconciliation / Monique Gray Smith
“Canada’s relationship with its Indigenous people has suffered as a result of both the residential school system and the lack of understanding of the historical and current impact of those schools. Healing and repairing that relationship requires education, awareness and increased understanding of the legacy and the impacts still being felt by Survivors and their families. Guided by acclaimed Indigenous author Monique Gray Smith, readers will learn about the lives of Survivors and listen to allies who are putting the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission into action.”

 


Aboriginal worldviews and perspectives in the classroom: Moving forward / BC Ministry of Education
“The past decade has witnessed several significant developments affecting Aboriginal Education in BC. Most visible, perhaps, has been the acknowledgment on the part of both the Province of British Columbia and government of Canada of the mistreatment and disrespect that Aboriginal peoples have endured throughout much of our nation’s history. This has resulted in a new attentiveness on the part of government to long-standing demands from Aboriginal leaders for a fresh approach to the provision of formal education at all levels.”

New browser extension allows for seamless access to UBC Library’s online resources

 

UBC Library users can now use Library Access, a browser extension that provides seamless access to UBC Library subscriptions from anywhere on the web.

The extension, which requires a ‘once only’ installation, automatically detects when users are on a website that contains content the library subscribes to and allows access without having to visit the library website first.

If the content is not accessible, the extension will automatically check for open-access versions.

For Barbara Sobol, Undergraduate Services Librarian at UBCO, the browser extension is making research easier and more intuitive for her students. “For many students, Google is often the most logical place to start,” she says, “This tool prevents them from having to fragment their research between what is accessible through the library and what is available through other sources like government websites etc. It allows them to explore the full scope of sources more easily.”

Library Access is available for most frequently used browsers: Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari and Microsoft Edge. 

Download the Library Access Browser extension.

Visit the Library guide for FAQs and tips for troubleshooting.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to create and deliver responsive collections.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

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