Are citation practices fair to Indigenous scholars? Who scholars cite, how scholars cite, and what sources are considered authoritative to cite can validate and legitimize knowledge or oppress knowledge. Frequently, Indigenous ways of knowing (oral teachings and histories in particular) are delegitimized in academia by citational politics. In this session, learn more about “citational politics,” the existing templates for citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers, and about the current initiatives at X̱wi7x̱wa to further legitimize citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers in academia.

Participants will be able to:

    • Discuss the concept of “citational politics,” including how Indigenous traditional knowledge is devalued in academia through dominant citational practices and how we can challenge these practices
    • Recognize and create existing templates for citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers
    • Be aware of current initiatives at X̱wi7x̱wa Library and elsewhere to create a Chicago style template for citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers

When: October 22 at 3PM-4:30PM PST

Facilitated by Bronwen McKie: A student Librarian at X̱wi7x̱wa Library and a senior MASLIS candidate at the UBC iSchool. Bronwen’s values of community, collaboration, and equitable access to information guide her professional interests in scholarly communication & publishing and reference and instruction librarianship. Bronwen also enjoys writing, staying active and planning vacations she can’t afford. She is a settler of Welsh heritage, but was born and raised in Mi’kma’ki (Nova Scotia).

Registration: https://events.ctlt.ubc.ca/events/decolonizing-citations-october-22-2020/

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet