This latest Collection Spotlight highlights just a few of our English and French graphic novels as well as some books for those interested in creating their own or teaching using graphic novels as a resource.

 

English Graphic Novels

Seeking Refuge: a graphic novel
Irene N. Watts; illustrations by Kathryn E. Shoemaker.
PZ7.7.W377 Sk 2016

Eleven-year-old Marianne is fortunate. She is one of the first two hundred Jewish children on the heroic rescue operation known as the Kindertransport, which arrived in London, England in December, 1938. With the outbreak of World War II in 1939 Marianne finds herself being evacuated to Wales. She is shuffled from one unsuitable home to another, but there is a surprise in store and Marianne’s courage and resilience is finally rewarded.

Earth girl made easy
Cecil Castellucci, writer.
PN6727.C389 E27 2017

Loma Shade may be from another planet, but she’s still like every other twentysomething who feels that their life is going nowhere fast. Bored out of her mind, her solution is to drop out of school, dump her boyfriend and leave her homeworld of Meta behind–courtesy of the infamous “madness coat” of renegade poet Rac Shade, which is not so much a garment as it is a multidimensional gateway. After stealing the coat and astrally projecting herself across space, Loma ends up in the body of Megan Boyer, an Earth girl who seems to have it all: youth, beauty and a conveniently damaged brain. Following her “miraculous” recovery, however, Loma finds there’s just one problem with being Megan: Everyone hates her. She was a bully who terrorized her enemies and her friends alike, and now Loma’s stuck with the consequences. To make matters worse, back on Meta there are dark forces that want Rac’s dangerously valuable coat for their own nefarious purposes, and they’re closing in on Loma’s vulnerable physical body. At the same time, the primal madness that the coat channels is slowly, irresistibly eroding Loma’s equally vulnerable soul. With two new lives to live, can this Changing Girl survive either one without losing her mind?” 

New kid
Jerry Craft; with colour by Jim Callahan.
PZ7.7.C733 Nw 2019

Seventh-grader Jordan Banks loves nothing more than drawing cartoons about his life. But instead of sending him to the art school of his dreams, his parents enroll him in a prestigious private school known for its academics, where Jordan is one of the few kids of colour in his entire grade. As he makes the daily trip from his Washington Heights apartment to the upscale Riverdale Academy Day School, Jordan soon finds himself torn between two worlds–and not really fitting into either one. Can Jordan learn to navigate his new school culture while keeping his neighbourhood friends and staying true to himself?

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Tomboy: a graphic memoir
Liz Prince.
HQ1075 .P75 2014

Eschewing female stereotypes throughout her early years and failing to gain acceptance on the boys’ baseball team, Liz learns to embrace her own views on gender as she comes of age in this anecdotal graphic novel memoir.
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Boundless
Jillian Tamaki.
PN6733.T35 B68 2017

A collection of short comics about various women.
“Jenny becomes obsessed with a strange “mirror Facebook,” which presents an alternate, possibly better, version of herself. Helen finds her clothes growing baggy, her shoes looser, and as she shrinks away to nothingness, the world around her recedes as well. The animals of the city briefly open their minds to us, and we see the world as they do. A mysterious music file surfaces on the internet and forms the basis of a utopian society-or is it a cult? Boundless is at once fantastical and realist, playfully hinting at possible transcendence: from one’s culture, one’s relationship, oneself. This collection of short stories is a showcase for the masterful blend of emotion and humour of award-winning cartoonist Jillian Tamaki”–Amazon.com.

The unwanted: stories of the Syrian refugees
Written and illustrated by Don Brown.
DS98.6 .B76 2018

Syria, 2011: Teenage boys graffiti “Down with the regime” on a wall. This small act is just one of the many sparks that ignite a revolution to overthrow the tyrannical rule of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad. But Assad and his supporters are ruthless: imprisonment, torture, and devastating massacres tear the country apart. Refugees begin to flee Syria in staggering numbers. The unexpected flood of victims overwhelms neighbouring countries. Desperate refugees escape to Europe. Chaos reigns. Resentment heightens as disruption and the cost of aid grow. By 2017, the war rages on and many nations want to close their borders and turn their backs on the victims. The refugees are the unwanted. Don Brown, the award-winning creator of The Great American Dust Bowl and Drowned City, depicts moments of both heartbreaking horror and hope in the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis. Shining a light on the stories of the survivors, The Unwanted is both a testament to the courage and resilience of the refugees and a call to action, serving as a timely reminder that this is not just a Syrian crisis, but a human crisis. — From dust jacket.

Guts
Raina Telgemeier; with colour by Braden Lamb.
BF723.S75 T45 2019

“Raina wakes up one night with a terrible upset stomach. Her mom has one, too, so it’s probably just a bug. Raina eventually returns to school, where she’s dealing with the usual highs and lows: friends, not-friends, and classmates who think the school year is just one long gross-out session. It soon becomes clear that Raina’s tummy trouble isn’t going away… and it coincides with her worries about food, school, and changing friendships. What’s going on?”–Provided by publisher.
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Cheshire Crossing
Andy Weir; illustrated by Sarah Andersen.
PN6727.W4167 C44 2019

“What happens to Alice when she comes back from Wonderland? Wendy from Neverland? Dorothy from Oz? The three meet here, at Cheshire Crossing — a boarding school where girls like them learn how to cope with their supernatural experiences and harness their magical world-crossing powers. But the trio — now teenagers, who’ve had their fill of meddling authority figures — aren’t content to sit still in a classroom. Soon they’re dashing from one universe to the next, leaving havoc in their wake — and, inadvertently, bringing the Wicked Witch and Hook together in a deadly supervillain love match. To stop them, the girls will have to draw on all of their powers… and marshal a team of unlikely allies from across the magical multiverse.”–Provided by publisher.

Hostage
Guy Delisle; translated by Helge Dascher.
PN6733.D44 S4613 2017

“In the middle of the night in 1997, Doctors Without Borders administrator Christophe André was kidnapped by armed men and taken away to an unknown destination in the Caucasus region. For three months, André was kept handcuffed in solitary confinement, with little to survive on and almost no contact with the outside world. Close to twenty years later, award-winning cartoonist Guy Delisle … recounts André’s harrowing experience in Hostage, a book that attests to the power of one man’s determination in the face of a hopeless situation.”

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French

Mechant Minou chez le véterinaire
Nick Bruel; texte français d’Hélène Pilotto.
PZ23.B78 Mc 2016

Quand Méchant minou est en forme, tout va bien. Il saute partout, il mange tout ce qui lui tombe sous la patte, et a assez d’énergie pour éloigner les chiots malcommodes. Par contre, lorsqu’il est malade, il reste cloué au lit. Serait-il temps d’aller rendre visite au vétérinaire?

When Méchant minou is happy and healthy, everything is perfect. He jumps around, eats everything in sight, and has the energy to keep slobbering puppies in their place. But when he’s sick, all he can do is lie in bed. Looks like it’s time for this sick kitty to visit her least favourite person. the vet.

Original title: Bad Kitty Goes to the Vet

Souris!
Raina Telgemeier ; coloration de Stephanie Yue ; texte français de France Gladu.
PZ23.T36 Sr 2011

Raina est une fille de 6e année qui fait de son mieux pour être comme les autres – elle est rongée par l’inquiétude sachant qu’elle devra bientôt porter un appareil d’orthodontie. C’était son état d’esprit avant de se briser les dents en tombant tête première sur le pavé… Cet accident marque le début d’une longue période de frustrations pour Raina. Chirurgie, appareils d’orthodontie et fausses dents font désormais partie de sa vie. Et comme un malheur n’arrive jamais seul… La ville est secouée par un tremblement de Terre. La jeune fille ne cesse de commettre des maladresses avec les garçons. Et que dire des moqueries de ses amis? Souris Raina, la vie est belle!

Eleven-year-old Raina just wants to be a normal sixth grader. But one night after a trip-and-fall mishap, she injures her two front teeth, and what follows is a long and frustrating journey with on-again, off-again braces, corrective surgery, embarrassing headgear, and even a retainer with fake teeth attached. And on top of all that, there’s still more to deal with: a major earthquake, boy confusion, and friends who turn out to be not so friendly.

This coming-of-age true story is sure to resonate with anyone who has ever been in middle school, and especially those who have had a bit of their own dental drama.

Original title: Smile

Louis parmi les spectres
Fanny Britt; [illustrations] Isabelle Arsenault.
PZ23.7.B76 Ls 2016

“Louis parmi les spectres est le nouveau livre du duo Fanny Britt et Isabelle Arsenault à La Pastèque ! Louis a onze ans, une mère qui a peur de tout, un père qui pleure quand il boit et un petit frère obsédé par la soul américaine. Il rêve de déclarer son amour à Billie, une compagne de classe indépendante et solitaire. Mais dans la réalité, rien à faire : dès qu’il s’approche d’elle, Louis est tétanisé comme un clou rouillé. Aidé par sa famille, son fidèle ami Boris et les spectres du passé qui peuplent son monde intérieur, Louis découvrira la vraie définition du courage. Après le succès phénoménal de Jane, le renard et moi, Fanny Britt et Isabelle Arsenault collaborent de nouveau pour nous offrir une bande dessinée aussi sensible, touchante et époustouflante que la première.”–From Renaud-Bray.com.

Instructional Books

Share your smile: Raina’s guide to telling your own story
Raina Telgemeier.
PN159 .T45 2019

Have you ever thought about telling your own story, whether it be true or imagined? Are you interested in writing, drawing, or both? If the answers are yes, this fun, colourful, and interactive journal is for you! With guidance from Raina herself, brainstorm ideas, make lists, paste in personal photos, and use your imagination like never before to create your own stories. For additional inspiration, behind-the-scenes info from Raina’s own comics-making adventures is featured inside.

The 101 best graphic novels
Stephen Weiner.
PN6710 .W45 2005

An ultimate guide to the best of what’s out there and available now. It includes an introduction by Neil Gaiman, and is edited by Keith DeCandido.

This concise guide to the best that’s out there and available now is updated considerably with half of the listings all new and a significant representation of the best in manga.
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Wham: teaching with graphic novels across the curriculum
William G. Brozo, Gary Moorman, Carla K. Meyer; foreword by Stergios Botzakis.
LB1044.9.C59 B76 2014

Graphic novels are an excellent medium to motivate today’s youth to become independent learners and thinkers. This practical guide shows secondary school teachers how to incorporate graphic novels into content area instruction as a tool for meeting the needs of diverse learners and achieving the goals of the Common Core State Standards. The authors provide instructional guidelines with classroom examples that demonstrate how graphic novels can be used to expand content knowledge and literacy in science, social studies, math, and English/language arts. Teachers will appreciate the book’s specific suggestions for selecting graphic novels and for employing responsive practices that will build students’ reading, writing, speaking, listening, and media competencies.

November 2020 is the 6th anniversary of Indigenous Disability Awareness Month in B.C. and across Canada. The B.C. Aboriginal Network on Disability Society notes that “Indigenous people in Canada experience a disability rate significantly higher than that of the general population. Indigenous Disability Awareness Month (IDAM) brings awareness of these barriers and issues that Indigenous peoples and their families living with disabilities face every day. More importantly, we celebrate their achievements and recognize the significant and valuable contributions they make to our communities socially, economically, and culturally.”

In relation to Indigenous Disability Awareness Month X̱wi7x̱wa Library hoped to produce a booklist of #ownvoices fiction, non-fiction and scholarly sources related to Indigenous experiences of disability. After searching UBC’s scholarly resources, Twitter, GoodReads, Google, we found a gap in fiction, non-fiction and scholarly writing on this topic.

We’d love to hear from you: what are your recommendations for #ownvoices reading or media about Indigenous experiences of disability? Email us at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca!

At UBC, the Crane Library is available to support students with disabilities through the Centre for Accessibility.

 

Researching Disability and Indigeneity

The language used to define and discuss disability, or differing abilities, is often context dependent and especially so in Indigenous communities. Beliefs about wellness and unwellness are different from community to community and often expanded to include the impact of colonization. Research about disability and Indigenous people is limited but is located primarily at the intersection of Disability Studies and Indigenous Studies, although it could encompass other areas of study (e.g.: education, social work, occupational therapy). Please bear in mind that some of the terminology used to do research about disability and Indigeneity may be outdated.

Start your research using the UBC catalogue or Summon. Please visit X̱wi7x̱wa Library’s First Nations and Indigenous Studies research guide for more information about doing research. Please email xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca for additional research support.

Useful keywords for searching UBC Summon and databases might include:

Combine keywords related to Indigenous identity with keywords about your topic. For example: Indigenous AND disability

  • Indigenous
  • Aboriginal
  • race
  • disability / disabilities
  • accessibility
  • ableism
  • wellness
  • Terminology specific to different abilities (deaf, deafened, Sign Language, Indigenous Sign Language, etc.)
  • Terminology specific to Indigenous communities (Cree, Métis, Inuit, etc.)

See X̱wi7x̱wa Library’s “First Nations and Indigenous Studies” guide for additional information about searching using keywords and finding Indigenous perspectives.

Some useful subject heading for searching UBC Summon might include:

(Native people with disabilities)

(“Aboriginal Canadians” AND Disabilities)

(“Disabled people” AND “Native American studies”)

Useful journals and other e-resources might include:

Disability & Society

Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies

Native Health Database

iPortal

Routledge Handbooks Online

Core Indigenous Studies journals

Indigenous health databases and statistics

 

Fiction and Non-Fiction

Below, you’ll find some adult and children’s books written by self-identified Indigenous authors with disabilities, Indigenous literature with differently abled characters, and books on the topic of disability. Unless otherwise noted, all books listed are available at a UBC Library for currently registered students, faculty and staff. For community borrowers, please check for these books at your local public library. If your library does not carry a book that you want, you can often request the library purchase it.

Adult Books & Media

Heart Berries: a memoir by Theresa Marie Mailhot: In this memoir, Mailhot chronicles her experience living with chronic mental illness.

“Seed Children” by Mari Kurisato in Love After the End. Love After the End is a new two-spirit, Indigiqueer science fiction/fantasy anthology, currently available as an ebook with the physical book on order at Vancouver Public Library.

Aboriginal Sign Languages of the Americas and Australia edited by D. Jean Umiker-Sebeok and Thomas Sebeok:

Indian Sign Language by William Tomkins: An unabridged and corrected re-publication of the 1931 fifth edition of the work originally published by the author in San Diego, California under the title Universal Indian Sign Language of the Plains Indians of North America.

My Sister by Thirza Cuthand and Danielle Ratslaff (streaming media): Two thoughtful young friends openly discuss their relationship with their sisters, both of whom have intellectual disabilities.

You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me by Sherman Alexie: In this 2017 memoir, the author recounts his childhood hydrocephaly, alcoholism and bipolar disorder.

All the Weight of Our Dreams: On Living Racialized Autism: “Delve into poetry, essays, short fiction, photography, paintings, and drawings in the first-ever anthology entirely by autistic people of color, featuring 61 writers and artists from seven countries. The work here represents the lives, politics, and artistic expressions of Black, Brown, Latinx, Indigenous, Mixed-Race, and other racialized and people of color from many autistic communities, often speaking out sharply on issues of marginality, intersectionality, and liberation.” Available at Vancouver Public Library.

My only daughter : Karina Beth-Ann Wolfe / producer/director, Grace Smith: “Carole Wolfe, a deaf Indigenous woman in Saskatoon, bravely shares the story of her daughter’s disappearance in 2010. Told in American Sign Language.”

Children’s Books

Native Athletes in Action! By Vincent Schilling (for middle grade ages): In Chapter 3, readers meet Cheri Becerra-Madsen (Omaha) a wheelchair racing Olympian and world record holder who lost use of her legs at age 3.

Tribal Journey by Gary Robinson (for middle grade ages): “Sixteen-year-old Jason is left with a paralyzed leg after a car accident and it is only after becoming involved with his Duwamish mother’s tribe and learning to “pull” a canoe that he begins to see himself as more than a boy in a wheelchair.”

Spirit Bear and Children Make History (for elementary grade ages): “Hello! My name is Sus Zul in the Carrier language. In English, people call me Spirit Bear. I am a proud member of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council. I am on my way to Ottawa, Ontario, to witness a very important human rights case. Would you join me on this journey?” When Spirit Bear’s mom tells him about an important human rights case happening in Ottawa, Ontario, he makes the LONG trip (by train, his favourite way to travel) to go and watch, and to stand up for First Nations kids. And he isn’t the only one! Lots of children come too — to listen, and to show they care. Spirit Bear knows that children can change the world because he’s there to see it happen. This is the story of how kids — kids just like you — made a difference … with a bit of help from some bears and other animals along the way!”

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