Since 2013, the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre has been a funding partner with the Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) and the Network of Inquiry and Innovation (NOII). Through this partnership, the Learning Centre has supported teachers working with aboriginal students transitioning to further education. Read more about it here.

How can rigorous research help us advance the concept and practice of social justice?  In the fourth event of the 2017 PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series, join us as eight doctoral students from the Public Scholars Initiative have seven minutes each to talk about their research on, and search for, social justice. Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Vancouver Public Library as part of the Public Scholars Initiative.


Speakers

Emma Feltes (Anthropology) works in partnership with Indigenous activists to delve into the history of the “Constitution Express”—a movement in the 1980s to assert Indigenous rights, nationhood, and self-determination during the patriation of Canada’s Constitution— with a view to inform our relations today.

Jocelyn Fraser (Mining Engineering) focuses on social risk and social responsibility in the international mining sector with a particular focus in Arequipa, Peru, where she investigates ways how mining companies can collaborate with communities to deliver tangible social benefits.

Maggie Low (IRES) collaborates with the Heiltsuk Nation in Bella Bella, BC, to investigate the implementation of a large scale land use agreement between Coastal First Nations and the BC government, as well the implications of the agreement for Indigenous well-being and governance.

Kyle Loewen (Geography) partners with labour communities in the US who are employed in “last-mile” delivery—the distance between retailer warehouses and a consumer’s home—to address labour-related issues and improve working conditions in this sector.

Jeremy Stone (Planning) collaborates with urban community organisations in Vancouver and New Orleans to explore gentrification practices in these cities from a multidisciplinary perspective, and seeks to increase the resilience of neighborhoods in the face of catastrophic change.

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry) collaborates with Natura Foundation Bolivia to explore the issues of participation, knowledge production and roles of different actors in the development of an indigenous-driven environmental intervention in Bolivia.

Alicia Luedke (Political Science) investigates the impact of global policies seeking to prevent and prohibit the use of sexual violence in war on armed group practices of rape and other-related offenses in conflict situations.

Sarah Fessenden (Anthropology) teams up with “Food Not Bombs” activists to understand and address commercial food-waste in the face of hunger; she works closely with donors and anti-hunger activists to find empowering ways of getting otherwise wasted food to people in need.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Feltes, E. (2015). Research as Guesthood: The Memorial to Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Resolving Indigenous-Settler Relations in British Columbia. [Link]

Feltes, E. “We will help each other to be great and good”: The Memorial to Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Resolving Indigenous-State Relations in Canada. [Link]

Fraser, J. Corporate responsibility and advocacy conviction: How the forces of passion and reason shape contemporary industrial issues. [Link]

Low, M. M. Negotiating Environmental Governance: Lessons from the Great Bear Rainforest Agreements in British Columbia, Canada. [Link]

Loewen, K. (2012). From Problems of Citizenship to Questions of Action. [Link]

Adeyeye, Y. et al. (2017). Human(e) Interactions with the Environment. [Link]

Luedke, A. E. (2014). Three types of wartime sexual violence: Recruitment and retention of armed combatants in civil war. [Link]

Fessenden, S. G. (2017). “We just wanna warm some bellies” : Food not bombs, anarchism, and recycling wasted food for protest . [Link]

Video sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Schools participate in the Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) on a voluntary and annual basis. AESN schools link their inquiry specifically to Aboriginal ways of knowing. The Spiral of Inquiry provides school teams with the structure for guiding their improvement and innovation work. Participating schools develop and submit an inquiry focus, collaborate with colleagues through regional meetings, and share case studies in a spirit of generosity and curiosity.

Speakers:

Lynne Tomlinson (Director of Instruction), SD 45, West Vancouver

Trish Catherine (Teacher), Ecole Ballenas Secondary SD 69, Qualicum

Paul Boyd (Teacher) WL Seaton Secondary, SD 22, Vernon

Marcus Toneatto (Principal), South Okanagan Secondary School, SD 53, Okanagan Similkameen

Mary Neto (Teacher), Smithers Secondary, SD 54, Bulkley Valley

Roberta Edzerza, (District Principal, Aboriginal Education) and Sandy Pond (Principal), Charles Hays Secondary, SD 53, Prince Rupert

Robert Taddei, (Teacher), Frank Hurt Secondary SD 36, Surrey

 

 

 

 

 

 


This exhibit takes place at IKBLC from April 1 to 28, 2017, as a collaboration between the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Community Engagement & Programs Division and the Roedde House Museum.  A re-mounting of an earlier three-part exhibit on three families called Victorian Vancouver: Family Portraits, this exhibit illustrates how migrant families in early 20th century Vancouver fostered their own sites of commerce, community, and culture.   The exhibit tells the stories of the Roedde’s and their printing business and the Lam family of Ho Sun Hing printers, the city’s first Chinese-English print shop.  This exhibit is a side-by-side story of these two early migrant family printers in Vancouver.  Ho Sun Hing Printers was Vancouver’s first Chinese-English print shop, founded by Lam family patriarch, Lam Lat Tong.

 

Image credit: The Lam Family

The shop was one of the oldest operating print businesses, with its final location in Vancouver’s historical Chinatown, closing recently in 2013 after being in business for more than a hundred years.  Although the Roedde House Museum does not house any of the Ho Sun Hing materials that were on display in 2014, this exhibit’s items are lent to the Museum by third-generation printer, Norman Lam.  Norman also graciously took the time to share his family’s story of migration to Canada, working in the print shop, and growing up in Chinatown.

The Roedde House Museum is a fully-restored and refurnished Victorian home in the West End.  Now a local hub for concerts, lectures, readings, and all sorts of community art, historical, and cultural events, the Roedde House is a “living museum” inviting guests to interact with the home and its artefacts to imagine what life was life for an upper-class migrant family at the turn of the 20th century.

Who were the Roedde’s?

Image credit: the Roedde House Museum

Gustav Roedde was one of the city’s first bookbinders and urban settlers. He was born in 1860 in Thuringen, Germany. He trained as a printer and bookbinder in Leipzig, Germany’s famed “City of Books”. In 1882 he emigrated to Ohio USA. There he met and married Matilda Cassebohm. In 1886 the couple moved to Canada and started a family and bookbinding and printing business. The house on 1415 Barclay Street was built for them in the year 1893. The Roedde home remains an important part of Vancouver History as one of the few Heritage Houses remaining and restored from a pivotal time in the beginnings in modern Vancouver.

With the growth of fast digital technology and communication today, we often take print for granted. But back in Gustav’s time, books and print were a major mode of communication. Vancouver as a settler city and colony, was able to develop businesses, industry, journalism, travel and of course, a government. It is arguable that print and book production by pioneers like Gustav, were solely responsible for the type of communication needed to grow these very sectors of the city we live in today. A new city was for migrants like Gustav, new opportunity. There was a common saying at the time to “Take it to the Roedde’s” whenever locals had printing or bookbinding needs.


This exhibit takes place April 1 to 28th, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level)


For questions, please contact the Community Engagement Librarian (Allan Cho) or Program Services Assistant (Kristen Wong)

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC School of Nursing as part of the Marion Woodward Lecture. Professor John Keady will share the intervention work that he is leading with an interdisciplinary Dementia and Ageing Research Team [DART] based at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work at the University of Manchester. DART have developed programs of work based around creative social research methods and the joint creation of knowledge with people living with dementia and their family/social networks.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Keady, a Nursing Professor of Older People’s Mental Health at the University of Manchester, is also the Chief Investigator of the five-year ESRC/NIHR Neighbourhoods and Dementia mixed methods, multi-site, research study [2014-2019] which is funded as part of the UK Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia. The Neighbourhoods Study includes a program of work located at the Center for Dementia Research at Linköping University, Sweden. An overview of the Neighbourhoods Study will be shared and will include a focus on the role that people with dementia are playing on the research program. His presentation will conclude with locating neighbourhoods within the wider context of the dementia friendly community movement and the role of nursing in transforming approaches to care through the personal empowerment of people living with dementia.

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Vancouver Institute. A native of South Africa, Ms. Logan has earned a reputation as one of the world’s best foreign correspondents, reporting stories from most of the world’s major conflict zones including Egypt, Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, Israel and Kosovo. Her courageous work has earned her some of the most prestigious awards in her field, including a duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton, an Emmy, an Overseas Press Club Award, an Edward R. Murrow Award, and five American Women in Radio and Television Gracie Awards. She was the only journalist from an American network in Baghdad when the U.S. military invaded the city, reporting live from Firdos Square as the statue of Saddam fell. Before formally joining CBS, Ms. Logan already had 14 years of journalism experience in the international broadcast news arena with ITN and Fox/SKY, ABC, NBC, CNN and the European Broadcast Union. This lecture is cosponsored by UBC’s Global Reporting Centre.

This event took place on September 17, 2016.


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Beg, M. A. (1999). National security: Diplomacy and defence. Rawalpindi: FRIENDS Publication. [Available at Koerner Library- UA853.P3 B444 1999]

Snow, D., & Taylor & Francis eBooks (2016). Thinking about national security [Link]


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