Featured new children’s books for the month of December.  Click on the book cover or title to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

This promise of change: one girl’s story in the fight for school equality
Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy
F444.C68 B69 2019

In 1956, one year before federal troops escorted the Little Rock 9 into Central High School, fourteen-year-old Jo Ann Allen was one of twelve African-American students who broke the colour barrier and integrated Clinton High School in Tennessee. At first, things went smoothly for the Clinton 12, but then outside agitators interfered, pitting the townspeople against one another. Uneasiness turned into anger, and even the Clinton Twelve themselves wondered if the easier thing to do would be to go back to their old school. Jo Ann–clear-eyed, practical, tolerant, and popular among both black and white students–found herself called on as the spokesperson of the group. But what about just being a regular teen? This is the heartbreaking and relatable story of her four months thrust into the national spotlight and as a trailblazer in history. Based on original research and interviews and featuring backmatter with archival materials and notes from the authors on the co-writing process.
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Hidden figures: the true story of four Black women and the space race
Margot Lee Shetterly with Winifred Conkling; illustrated by Laura Freeman
QA27.5 .S548 2018

Explores the previously uncelebrated but pivotal contributions of NASA’s African American women mathematicians to America’s space program, describing how Jim Crow laws segregated them despite their groundbreaking successes. Includes biographies on Dorothy Jackson Vaughan (1910-2008), Mary Winston Jackson (1921-2005), Katherine Colman Goble Johnson (1918- ), Dr. Christine Mann Darden (1942- ).
Katherine, Dorothy, Mary, and Christine were all good at math. Really good. And it was their understanding of numbers that helped them do what seemed impossible. They were women, and they were African-American, and they lived during a time when being black and a woman limited what they could do. But Katherine, Dorothy, Mary, and Christine were hardworking and persistent and, most important, smart. And that’s why NASA hired them to do the math that would one day send the United States into space for the very first time. New York Times bestselling author Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrator Laura Freeman bring to life the inspiring story of the struggles of these four “hidden figures” and what they overcame to succeed. The math work they did would change not only their own lives, but the face of air and space travel forever.

On the playground: our first talk about prejudice
Dr. Jillian Roberts; illustrations by Jane Heinrichs
HM1091 .R63 2019

On the Playground: Our First Talk About Prejudice focuses on introducing children to the complex topic of prejudice. Crafted around a narrative between a grade-school-aged child and an adult, this inquiry-focused book will help children shape their understanding of diversity so they are better prepared to understand, and question, prejudice witnessed around them in their day-to-day lives and in the media. Dr. Jillian Roberts discusses types of discrimination children notice, what prejudice means, why it’s not okay, how to stand up against it and how kids can spread a message of inclusion and acceptance in the world around them.

Featured new resources for the month of December.  Click on the book cover or title to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

200+ original and adapted story program activities
Rob Reid
Z718.3 .R435 2018

From master storyteller and storytimes creator Reid comes this delightful assortment of activities ready for use by children’s librarians, elementary-level media specialists, and early childhood instructors. Reid’s bountiful compendium of his “greatest hits” includes original and adapted fingerplays, poems, activities involving movement and music, participation stories, felt stories, imagination exercises, spoonerism stories, and library raps. With ideas that are perfect for mixing and matching according to audience, setting, and program length, this book:

  • offers activities suitable for a variety of ages, from children as young as preschool age through middle school students;
  • begins with “Hello Activities” and ends with “Goodbye Activities”;
  • includes categories such as “The Animal World,” “My World,” “More Fun,” and “The Literary World”; and
  • recommends picture books published between 2012 and 2017 to share with children immediately before or after presenting the activity.

Drawn from thousands of hours of programming, these time-tested activities will engage young ones as well as their parents and caregivers.

Teaching for mastery
Mark McCourt
LB1025.3 .M347 2019

There are many models of schooling; some work, some don’t. Mastery is an entire model of schooling with over 100 years of provenance, its impact has been researched for decades, with many of the world’s greatest education minds testing and refining the approach. It’s one of the models of schooling that actually works. In this book, Mark McCourt examines the history of a teaching for mastery approach, from its early beginnings to the modern day when cognitive scientists have been able to bring further evidence to the debate, demonstrating why a model that was first proposed in the 1910s has the incredible impact on both pupil attainment and attitudes to learning that it has had all around the world over many decades. Drawing on examples from cross disciplines, the story of mastery is one that all educators can engage with. Mark also draws on his own subject, mathematics, to further exemplify the approach and to give practical examples of pedagogies and didactics that teachers can deploy immediately in their own classroom.
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Literacy for the 21st century: a balanced approach
Tompkins, Smith, Campbell, Green
LB1576 .T657 2019

The purpose of this product is to support PST develop knowledge, understanding and skill in teaching literacy to children from the Foundation Year to Year 6. To assist in achieving these goals, the product outlines from the beginning that successful teaching involves knowing the students, the content and associated curriculum requirements, and understanding how to apply this knowledge in explicit and skilled ways to meet individual students’ literacy learning needs. The product emphasizes that effective teachers continually engage in reflective practice to gauge if and how each student’s learning goals are achieved. It challenges the PST to consider ways of knowing, learning and teaching, providing opportunities to consider ways of using digital platforms to develop children’s reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing skills. Developed for preservice teachers, practising teachers and those interested in English literacy teaching and learning, this product includes a range of vignettes drawn from classroom and university practice across Australia, examples that stand to authenticate the learning. Additionally, this product Has respected and updated/current content, mapped to industry standards delivered in a range of customizable formats and affordable price points. Can be delivered via Revel, offering an interactive learning experience available on all devices Is part of a connected collection in the Education portfolio offering a suite of resources across an Education degree in a consistent format and style. Respected authors in the field Used across all levels of Bachelor and Masters Education courses.

This latest Collection Spotlight highlights just a few of our English and French graphic novels as well as some books for those interested in creating their own or teaching using graphic novels as a resource.

 

English Graphic Novels

Seeking Refuge: a graphic novel
Irene N. Watts; illustrations by Kathryn E. Shoemaker.
PZ7.7.W377 Sk 2016

Eleven-year-old Marianne is fortunate. She is one of the first two hundred Jewish children on the heroic rescue operation known as the Kindertransport, which arrived in London, England in December, 1938. With the outbreak of World War II in 1939 Marianne finds herself being evacuated to Wales. She is shuffled from one unsuitable home to another, but there is a surprise in store and Marianne’s courage and resilience is finally rewarded.

Earth girl made easy
Cecil Castellucci, writer.
PN6727.C389 E27 2017

Loma Shade may be from another planet, but she’s still like every other twentysomething who feels that their life is going nowhere fast. Bored out of her mind, her solution is to drop out of school, dump her boyfriend and leave her homeworld of Meta behind–courtesy of the infamous “madness coat” of renegade poet Rac Shade, which is not so much a garment as it is a multidimensional gateway. After stealing the coat and astrally projecting herself across space, Loma ends up in the body of Megan Boyer, an Earth girl who seems to have it all: youth, beauty and a conveniently damaged brain. Following her “miraculous” recovery, however, Loma finds there’s just one problem with being Megan: Everyone hates her. She was a bully who terrorized her enemies and her friends alike, and now Loma’s stuck with the consequences. To make matters worse, back on Meta there are dark forces that want Rac’s dangerously valuable coat for their own nefarious purposes, and they’re closing in on Loma’s vulnerable physical body. At the same time, the primal madness that the coat channels is slowly, irresistibly eroding Loma’s equally vulnerable soul. With two new lives to live, can this Changing Girl survive either one without losing her mind?” 

New kid
Jerry Craft; with colour by Jim Callahan.
PZ7.7.C733 Nw 2019

Seventh-grader Jordan Banks loves nothing more than drawing cartoons about his life. But instead of sending him to the art school of his dreams, his parents enroll him in a prestigious private school known for its academics, where Jordan is one of the few kids of colour in his entire grade. As he makes the daily trip from his Washington Heights apartment to the upscale Riverdale Academy Day School, Jordan soon finds himself torn between two worlds–and not really fitting into either one. Can Jordan learn to navigate his new school culture while keeping his neighbourhood friends and staying true to himself?

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Tomboy: a graphic memoir
Liz Prince.
HQ1075 .P75 2014

Eschewing female stereotypes throughout her early years and failing to gain acceptance on the boys’ baseball team, Liz learns to embrace her own views on gender as she comes of age in this anecdotal graphic novel memoir.
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Boundless
Jillian Tamaki.
PN6733.T35 B68 2017

A collection of short comics about various women.
“Jenny becomes obsessed with a strange “mirror Facebook,” which presents an alternate, possibly better, version of herself. Helen finds her clothes growing baggy, her shoes looser, and as she shrinks away to nothingness, the world around her recedes as well. The animals of the city briefly open their minds to us, and we see the world as they do. A mysterious music file surfaces on the internet and forms the basis of a utopian society-or is it a cult? Boundless is at once fantastical and realist, playfully hinting at possible transcendence: from one’s culture, one’s relationship, oneself. This collection of short stories is a showcase for the masterful blend of emotion and humour of award-winning cartoonist Jillian Tamaki”–Amazon.com.

The unwanted: stories of the Syrian refugees
Written and illustrated by Don Brown.
DS98.6 .B76 2018

Syria, 2011: Teenage boys graffiti “Down with the regime” on a wall. This small act is just one of the many sparks that ignite a revolution to overthrow the tyrannical rule of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad. But Assad and his supporters are ruthless: imprisonment, torture, and devastating massacres tear the country apart. Refugees begin to flee Syria in staggering numbers. The unexpected flood of victims overwhelms neighbouring countries. Desperate refugees escape to Europe. Chaos reigns. Resentment heightens as disruption and the cost of aid grow. By 2017, the war rages on and many nations want to close their borders and turn their backs on the victims. The refugees are the unwanted. Don Brown, the award-winning creator of The Great American Dust Bowl and Drowned City, depicts moments of both heartbreaking horror and hope in the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis. Shining a light on the stories of the survivors, The Unwanted is both a testament to the courage and resilience of the refugees and a call to action, serving as a timely reminder that this is not just a Syrian crisis, but a human crisis. — From dust jacket.

Guts
Raina Telgemeier; with colour by Braden Lamb.
BF723.S75 T45 2019

“Raina wakes up one night with a terrible upset stomach. Her mom has one, too, so it’s probably just a bug. Raina eventually returns to school, where she’s dealing with the usual highs and lows: friends, not-friends, and classmates who think the school year is just one long gross-out session. It soon becomes clear that Raina’s tummy trouble isn’t going away… and it coincides with her worries about food, school, and changing friendships. What’s going on?”–Provided by publisher.
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Cheshire Crossing
Andy Weir; illustrated by Sarah Andersen.
PN6727.W4167 C44 2019

“What happens to Alice when she comes back from Wonderland? Wendy from Neverland? Dorothy from Oz? The three meet here, at Cheshire Crossing — a boarding school where girls like them learn how to cope with their supernatural experiences and harness their magical world-crossing powers. But the trio — now teenagers, who’ve had their fill of meddling authority figures — aren’t content to sit still in a classroom. Soon they’re dashing from one universe to the next, leaving havoc in their wake — and, inadvertently, bringing the Wicked Witch and Hook together in a deadly supervillain love match. To stop them, the girls will have to draw on all of their powers… and marshal a team of unlikely allies from across the magical multiverse.”–Provided by publisher.

Hostage
Guy Delisle; translated by Helge Dascher.
PN6733.D44 S4613 2017

“In the middle of the night in 1997, Doctors Without Borders administrator Christophe André was kidnapped by armed men and taken away to an unknown destination in the Caucasus region. For three months, André was kept handcuffed in solitary confinement, with little to survive on and almost no contact with the outside world. Close to twenty years later, award-winning cartoonist Guy Delisle … recounts André’s harrowing experience in Hostage, a book that attests to the power of one man’s determination in the face of a hopeless situation.”

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French

Mechant Minou chez le véterinaire
Nick Bruel; texte français d’Hélène Pilotto.
PZ23.B78 Mc 2016

Quand Méchant minou est en forme, tout va bien. Il saute partout, il mange tout ce qui lui tombe sous la patte, et a assez d’énergie pour éloigner les chiots malcommodes. Par contre, lorsqu’il est malade, il reste cloué au lit. Serait-il temps d’aller rendre visite au vétérinaire?

When Méchant minou is happy and healthy, everything is perfect. He jumps around, eats everything in sight, and has the energy to keep slobbering puppies in their place. But when he’s sick, all he can do is lie in bed. Looks like it’s time for this sick kitty to visit her least favourite person. the vet.

Original title: Bad Kitty Goes to the Vet

Souris!
Raina Telgemeier ; coloration de Stephanie Yue ; texte français de France Gladu.
PZ23.T36 Sr 2011

Raina est une fille de 6e année qui fait de son mieux pour être comme les autres – elle est rongée par l’inquiétude sachant qu’elle devra bientôt porter un appareil d’orthodontie. C’était son état d’esprit avant de se briser les dents en tombant tête première sur le pavé… Cet accident marque le début d’une longue période de frustrations pour Raina. Chirurgie, appareils d’orthodontie et fausses dents font désormais partie de sa vie. Et comme un malheur n’arrive jamais seul… La ville est secouée par un tremblement de Terre. La jeune fille ne cesse de commettre des maladresses avec les garçons. Et que dire des moqueries de ses amis? Souris Raina, la vie est belle!

Eleven-year-old Raina just wants to be a normal sixth grader. But one night after a trip-and-fall mishap, she injures her two front teeth, and what follows is a long and frustrating journey with on-again, off-again braces, corrective surgery, embarrassing headgear, and even a retainer with fake teeth attached. And on top of all that, there’s still more to deal with: a major earthquake, boy confusion, and friends who turn out to be not so friendly.

This coming-of-age true story is sure to resonate with anyone who has ever been in middle school, and especially those who have had a bit of their own dental drama.

Original title: Smile

Louis parmi les spectres
Fanny Britt; [illustrations] Isabelle Arsenault.
PZ23.7.B76 Ls 2016

“Louis parmi les spectres est le nouveau livre du duo Fanny Britt et Isabelle Arsenault à La Pastèque ! Louis a onze ans, une mère qui a peur de tout, un père qui pleure quand il boit et un petit frère obsédé par la soul américaine. Il rêve de déclarer son amour à Billie, une compagne de classe indépendante et solitaire. Mais dans la réalité, rien à faire : dès qu’il s’approche d’elle, Louis est tétanisé comme un clou rouillé. Aidé par sa famille, son fidèle ami Boris et les spectres du passé qui peuplent son monde intérieur, Louis découvrira la vraie définition du courage. Après le succès phénoménal de Jane, le renard et moi, Fanny Britt et Isabelle Arsenault collaborent de nouveau pour nous offrir une bande dessinée aussi sensible, touchante et époustouflante que la première.”–From Renaud-Bray.com.

Instructional Books

Share your smile: Raina’s guide to telling your own story
Raina Telgemeier.
PN159 .T45 2019

Have you ever thought about telling your own story, whether it be true or imagined? Are you interested in writing, drawing, or both? If the answers are yes, this fun, colourful, and interactive journal is for you! With guidance from Raina herself, brainstorm ideas, make lists, paste in personal photos, and use your imagination like never before to create your own stories. For additional inspiration, behind-the-scenes info from Raina’s own comics-making adventures is featured inside.

The 101 best graphic novels
Stephen Weiner.
PN6710 .W45 2005

An ultimate guide to the best of what’s out there and available now. It includes an introduction by Neil Gaiman, and is edited by Keith DeCandido.

This concise guide to the best that’s out there and available now is updated considerably with half of the listings all new and a significant representation of the best in manga.
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Wham: teaching with graphic novels across the curriculum
William G. Brozo, Gary Moorman, Carla K. Meyer; foreword by Stergios Botzakis.
LB1044.9.C59 B76 2014

Graphic novels are an excellent medium to motivate today’s youth to become independent learners and thinkers. This practical guide shows secondary school teachers how to incorporate graphic novels into content area instruction as a tool for meeting the needs of diverse learners and achieving the goals of the Common Core State Standards. The authors provide instructional guidelines with classroom examples that demonstrate how graphic novels can be used to expand content knowledge and literacy in science, social studies, math, and English/language arts. Teachers will appreciate the book’s specific suggestions for selecting graphic novels and for employing responsive practices that will build students’ reading, writing, speaking, listening, and media competencies.

The latest Education Library Collection Spotlight takes a closer look at the topic of Inquiry-based learning.

Inquiry-based learning describes an educational approach in which, “learning is driven by a process of enquiry owned by the student. Starting with a ‘scenario’ and with the guidance of a facilitator, students identify their own issues and questions. They then examine the resources they need to research the topic, thereby acquiring the requisite knowledge” (Centre for Excellence in Enquiry-Based Learning, the University of Manchester).

UBC Education Library’s Inquiry-Based Learning booklists are separated by grade level:

All Grades

Elementary Grades (K- Grade 6)

Middle Years and Secondary Grades (Grades 7-12)

Picture Books for Inquiry-Based Learning

 

The following list contains professional resources for teachers, picture books, and ebook highlights from our collection:

 

Resources for teachers

Concept-based inquiry in action: strategies to promote transferable understanding / Carla Marschall and Rachel French; foreword by H. Lynn Erickson and Lois A. Lanning; illustrations by Andrea Mosteller.

LB1027.23 .M27 2018

“All students deserve the opportunity to think conceptually. But seeing conceptual relationships does not come naturally to every student. How can teachers construct thinking classrooms where students can move from the factual to the conceptual level of thinking? Concept-Based Inquiry in Action has the answers.

In this book, Carla Marschall and Rachel French marry theory with practice to create a new framework for inquiry that promotes deep understanding: Concept-Based Inquiry. The key is helping students inquire into concepts and the relationships between them using guiding questions developed by the teacher, by the students themselves, or by the teacher and students together.

Step by step, the authors lead both new and experienced educators to implement teaching strategies that support the realization of inquiry-based learning for understanding in any K-12 classroom.”

Genius hour: passion projects that ignite innovation and student inquiry / by Andi McNair.

LB1027.25 .M37 2017

Genius Hour provides educators with the tools that they need to successfully implement genius hour, or passion projects, in the classroom.

Presented through an easy-to-follow six-step strategy, teachers will utilize the six P’s-passion, pitch, plan, project, product, and presentation-as a map for students to follow as they create, design, and carry out projects.

Students will experience personalized learning through these self-driven projects, application of standards and real-world skills, and opportunities to learn through failure and reflection.

The book includes handouts, suggested online resources, and tips and tricks to make the genius hour process meaningful for students and manageable for educators, as well as a discussion of genius hour’s importance and impact on gifted students as they take ownership of their own learning.

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Think like Socrates: using questions to invite wonder and empathy into the classroom, grades 4-12 / Shanna Peeples.

LB1027.44 .P43 2018

Socrates believed in the power of questions rather than lecturing his students.

But how did we get so far away from his method of inquiry? Shanna Peeples, 2015 National Teacher of the Year, will show you how teachers can create an engaging atmosphere that encourages student questions and honors their experiences.

This resource provides

  • Questions paired with sample texts
  • Step-by-step lessons for generating and using students’ questions
  • Lesson extensions for English language learners, special education students, and gifted and talented students
  • Writing suggestions, in-class debate questions, and scoring rubrics
  • Multimedia texts
  • Protocols for using inquiry with adults as a base for professional development

Experience inquiry: 5 powerful strategies, 50 practical experiences / Kimberly L. Mitchell; foreword by Kath Murdoch.

LB1027.23 .M57 2019

“A book that offers fifty inquiry experiences so that teachers can teach in an inquiry-based way”–
Plenty of resources speak to the benefits of inquiry, the research behind it, and even subject-specific processes to follow. But that’s not enough. Implementing inquiry is the tricky part, and involves changing beliefs about the teacher and student roles in the classroom.

The strategies and experiences in this book improve your relationships with students and colleagues, reduce your workload by asking more of students, and breathe joyful curiosity back into your classroom.

One part practical guide, one part interactive journal, this book provides the opportunity to do inquiry as you read about it.

You’ll learn what inquiry-based instruction looks like in practice through five key strategies, all of which can be immediately implemented in any learning environment.”

Guided inquiry design in action: elementary school / Leslie K. Maniotes; preface by Carol C. Kuhlthau.

LB1060 .M326 2018

“One of three needed for district-wide implementation of GID at all levels, K-12, this book provides an introduction to an educational method that embeds information literacy into content areas and encourages students to acquire a more intimate knowledge of subjects through asking questions and conducting more thorough research.

Intended to be used alongside Guided Inquiry Design(R), lessons are laid out using the GID session plan templates from Guided Inquiry Design(R).

Readers can implement these lessons as they are or use them as models in designing their own, similar units customized for their own local or school population and to meet relevant standards and content.

Included in these lesson plans are lessons created by educators for increased student interaction that enhance the elementary educator’s ability to instruct younger students using the GID process.”

THINQ Kindergarten: inquiry-based learning in the kindergarten classroom / authors Joan Reimer and Deb Watters.

LB1027.23 .R46 2017

“THINQ Kindergarten, Inquiry-based learning in the kindergarten classroom, offers a readable and accessible overview of the big ideas of inquiry and applies them to the unique characteristics and needs of kindergarten learners, teachers and classrooms.

Chapters:

1) Inquiry-based learning in kindergarten,
2) Wondering and questioning,
3) Creating an inquiry environment,
4) Negotiating the curriculum,
5) Documentation,
6) Inquiry assessment in kindergarten,
7) Final thoughts”

Inquiry illuminated: researcher’s workshop across the curriculum / Anne Goudvis, Stephanie Harvey, Brad Buhrow with Karen Halverson; Photography by Ehren Joseph.

LB1027.23 .G683 2019

To immerse students in the richness and intrigue of the content areas, let the kids lead the way!

In Inquiry Illuminated, Anne Goudvis, Stephanie Harvey, and classroom teacher Brad Buhrow shine a light on researcher’s workshop-an approach whose true north emerges from kids’ curiosity. Adapting structures you already know from reader’s and writer’s workshop, they share a predictable, proven, and-most importantly-authentic approach that:

  • creates irresistible investigations in science, history and social studies, or language arts
  • increases students’ independence and agency by gradually releasing responsibility for inquiry
  • effectively integrates literacy and content through strategies for comprehension and critical thinking.

With copious full-color photographs and classroom video, Inquiry Illuminated shows how to create a culture where thoughtfulness, creativity, and collaboration can turn wonder into powerful inquiry. Then, with researcher’s workshop, you’ll uncover a process that transforms curiosity into opportunities to ask questions and follow a path to new understandings. Throughout you’ll discover how to bring in what you already do in reader’s and writer’s workshop to support students’ investigations as they read, write, create, and take action.

Inquiry-based early learning environments: creating, supporting, and collaborating / Susan Stacey.

LB1139.23 .S727 2019

“What does it mean to inquire? Grownups would say it means to question, to search for information, or to find out about a topic of interest. For children in an early childhood classroom, the definition is no different. From the time of their birth, children want to know how the world works and actively seek out information. How educators respond to their questions is what this book is all about.

Inquiry-Based Early Learning Environments takes an in-depth look at children’s inquiry. What does inquiry look like in early childhood settings? How does the environment affect children’s inquiries and teachers’ thought processes? Inquiry-Based Early Learning Environments examines inquiry in all its facets, including environments that support relationships, that create a culture of risk-taking in our thinking, that support teachers as well as children, that include families, that use documentation as a way of thinking about our work, and of course, the physical environment and all the objects and spaces within it. Throughout, stories about environments and approaches to inquiry from around the world are included as examples.”

Inquiry mindset: nurturing the dreams, wonders, & curiosities of our youngest learners / Trevor MacKenzie with Rebecca Bathurst-Hunt.

LB1027.44 .M27 2018

From their youngest years, our children are innately curious. They explore the world around them through play, imagination, and discovery. They build meaning, they create understanding, and they unabashedly share their learning. It’s in this process that they find joy in life and relevance in the world around them.

Why, then, do some of our students become disconnected from their learning in school? Where does this natural curiosity go? And how, as educators, can we ensure all of our students experience a meaningful and wonder-filled journey through their education?

It’s these questions that Trevor MacKenzie, author of the critically acclaimed book Dive into Inquiry, answers in Inquiry Mindset. Co-written with kindergarten teacher Rebecca Bathurst-Hunt, Inquiry Mindset offers a highly accessible journey through inquiry in the younger years. You’ll learn how to . . .

  • Empower your learners, increase engagement, and accelerate achievement.
  • Harness the wonderings and curiosities of your students and leverage them into powerful learning opportunities.
  • Cultivate an inquiry mindset both as a teacher and in your students
  • Adopt an inquiry approach that results in the most authentic and inspiring learning you’ve ever experienced

 

Picture books which can be used to introduce students to Inquiry-Based Learning

Ada Twist, scientist / by Andrea Beaty; illustrated by David Roberts.

PZ8.3.B38447 Ad 2016

“Inspired by real-life makers Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, this beloved #1 bestseller champions STEM, girl power and women scientists in a rollicking celebration of curiosity, the power of perseverance, and the importance of asking “Why?”

Ada Twist’s head is full of questions. Like her classmates Iggy and Rosie–stars of their own New York Times bestselling picture books Iggy Peck, Architect and Rosie Revere, Engineer–Ada has always been endlessly curious.

Even when her fact-finding missions and elaborate scientific experiments don’t go as planned, Ada learns the value of thinking her way through problems and continuing to stay curious.”

 

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What do you do with an idea? / written by Kobi Yamada; illustrated by Mae Besom; designed by Sarah Forster; edited by M.H. Clark & Amelia Riedler; creative direction by Julie Flahiff.

PZ7.Y18 Wh 2013

What do you do with an idea? Especially an idea that’s different, or daring, or a little wild?

This is the story of one brilliant idea and the child who helps to bring it into the world.

It’s a story for anyone, at any age, who’s ever had an idea that seemed too big, too odd, too difficult.

It’s a story to inspire you to welcome that idea, to give it space to grow, and to see what happens next.

What Do You Do With an Idea? has won several awards, including the Independent Publisher’s Book Gold Award, the Washington State Book Award, and the Moonbeam Children’s Book Award.

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Imagine a place / words by Sarah L. Thomson; paintings by Rob Gonsalves.

PZ4.9.T3772 Im 2008

If you can imagine a place, you can go there.

“Imagine a place that makes you feel as free as a bird. Imagine a place where getting there is worth whatever it takes.

Imagine a place that makes you feel like it’s always been your destination. Imagine a place made out of pure imagination.

Imagine a Place is a gorgeous companion to the critically acclaimed Imagine a Night and Imagine a Day, and reminds us that imagination is powerful enough to take us anywhere we want to go.

And Rob Gonsalves’s exquisitely conceived paintings leave you in awe…of his imagination.”

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Step forward with curiosity / Shannon Welbourn.

BF723.C8 M55 2017

“Without curiosity, we may never have known the world’s greatest inventions or discovered its most amazing places.

This empowering title offers helpful ideas, practical tips, and inspiring stories about how being curious about the world around you can help you reach your goals.

Inspirational stories of individuals show how their curiosity led them to regularly ask questions and seek answers leading them to uncover new and exciting things.

Learn how to make curiosity a habit that will help you step forward.”

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Anything is possible / Giulia Belloni, Marco Trevisan.

PZ10.3.B45 An 2013

“The sheep in this story is a dreamer, while her friend the wolf has a more practical disposition.

One day the sheep runs to the wolf with an idea. She wants to build a flying machine!

But the wolf tells her it’s impossible.

Eventually, however, the sheep’s dream gets the better of the wolf’s doubts, and they begin to work on the project together.

Through perseverance and the process of trial and error, the sheep and wolf manage to create a winning design, brought to life by architecturally and mathematically inspired paper collage art.

At the end of this whimsical tale, even the wolf has to admit that anything is possible!”

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ONLINE Inquiry books

The genius hour guidebook: fostering passion, wonder, and inquiry in the classroom by Denise Krebs, Gallit Zvi.

LB1027.23 .K735 2020

“Promote your students’ creativity and get them excited about learning! In the second edition of this popular, practical book, authors Denise Krebs and Gallit Zvi show you how to implement Genius Hour, a time when students can develop their own inquiry-based projects around their passions and take ownership of their work. Brought to you by MiddleWeb and Routledge Eye On Education, the book takes you step-by-step through planning and teaching Genius Hour. You’ll learn how to guide your students as they: inspire learning and brainstorm wonders; develop inquiry questions based on their interests; conduct research and experiments about their topic of choice; create presentations to teach their fellow students in creative ways; and present their finished product for a final assessment. This edition includes new chapters on managing your classroom projects and recommended books. Throughout the book you will find voices from the Genius Hour community sharing real life stories and inspiration. Appendices contain handy FAQs and ready-made lessons and resources. In addition, a companion website, www.geniushourguide.org, offers bonus materials and regular updates to support you as you implement Genius Hour in your own classroom”

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A practical guide to enquiry-based primary teaching: a reflective journey / Hellen Hill.

LB1556.7.G7 H55 2019

“A Practical Guide to Enquiry-Based Primary Teaching is a practical guide for developing an enquiry approach in primary schools.

It is intended for use by the primary practitioner as a thinking diary to nurture the skills required to be a successful, confident teacher and to support the school’s development.

The book provides space for the practitioner to record highs and lows in the classroom and experiences in meetings and training, ensuring it serves as a personal record of what works well but also a pertinent reminder of what can improve and what to learn from mistakes. This book is a bespoke journal which will be a valuable daily aid for primary teachers”

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Nature Education with young children: integrating Inquiry and Practice / edited by Daniel R. Meier and Stephanie Sisk-Hilton.

LB1140.5.S34 N38 2020

“Now in a fully updated second edition, Nature Education and Young Children remains a thoughtful, sophisticated teacher resource that blends theory and practice on nature education, children’s inquiry-based learning, and reflective teaching. Reorganized to enhance its intuitive flow, this edition features a Foreword by David Sobel and three wholly new chapters examining nature and literacy in kindergarten, outdoor play and children’s agency in a forest school, and the power of nature inquiry for dual language learners. Revised to reflect the latest research and guidelines, this book offers a seamless integration of science concepts into the daily intellectual and social investigations that occur in early childhood. With a fresh framing of nature exploration in the context of our current educational landscape, this text is a comprehensive guide for educators and students looking to introduce and deepen connections between nature education and teacher inquiry and reflection”

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Ask, explore, write: an inquiry-driven approach to science and literacy learning / Troy Hicks, Jeremy Hyler, Wiline Pangle.

Q225.5 .H53 2020

“Learn how to effectively incorporate literacy instruction into your middle or high school science classroom.

This practical book presents ten innovative strategies you can use to improve students’ abilities to read and write various types of scientific nonfiction, including argument essays, informational pieces, infographics, and more.

The strategies are aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards for ease of implementation. In addition, each chapter includes a variety of tools and examples of student work to help you along the way”

Remembrance Day books and other books about war for reading and sharing with students:

1. Remembrance Day: “Lest we forget” / Jill Foran

“Canadian Celebrations provides an exciting look at the events that people take part in during Canada’s major holidays. Each title provides information about the history, symbols, and traditions of these special days.”

2. In Flanders Fields: the story of the poem by John McCrae / Linda Granfield; [illustrated
by] Janet Wilson; with an introduction by Dr. Tim Cook.

“In this award-winning book, the lines of the celebrated poem are interwoven with fascinating information about the First World War (1914-1918) and details of daily life in the trenches in Europe. Also included are accounts of McCrae’s experience in his field hospital and the circumstances that led to the writing of “In Flanders Fields.”

3. On Remembrance Day By Eleanor Creasey

Online link
Permalink book at Education Library

An exploration of Canadian Remembrance Day history, customs, and traditions. Who are the people who offered their lives in war? Why do we remember them? How do we honour their memory?

For children learning about remembrance and the human toll of war, there can be hard questions to answer. This book is meant to answer the questions kids ask about Remembrance Day and to explain how and why we honour the men and women who have served our country. Canada has developed unique ways of honouring and demonstrating respect for its war dead and veterans.

Through every generation there are Canadian families who have lost loved ones to international conflict and war. On Remembrance Day presents the origins, traditions, and customs of Canada’s Remembrance Day in a fashion that is engaging and easy to read.

 

4. Remembrance Day / Molly Aloian

“Each year on November 11th, millions of people in Canada and other countries in the Commonwealth take time to remember the men and women who served their countries during times of war. This book describes how people around the world hold similar services featuring poppies, poems, and special prayers.”

5. Un coquelicot pour se souvenir / Heather Patterson ; [illustrations] Ron Lightburn ; text français de Claudine Azoulay

Un po’me sur l’espoir qu’inspire le coquelicot, qui s’?panouit l? o? la guerre a d’cim? tant d’humains. Ce po’me est le point de d’part d’une vaste campagne qui vise ? aider les victimes de la guerre, tout en rappelant aux autres combien il a fallu de courage pour survivre ? cette p’riode troubl’e.

Moving text coupled with stunning illustrations by Governor General’s Award-winning artist Ron Lightburn explain the symbolism behind the poppy.
A bonus for teachers is the five-page spread all about the poem, “In Flanders Fields,” Canada’s wartime and peacekeeping endeavours, and the adoption of the poppy as our Remembrance Day emblem.

6. A poppy is to remember / Heather Patterson ; [illustrations] Ron Lightburn.

“With soothing words and illustrations aimed specifically at younger readers, children will learn how the bright red poppy became the symbol for honouring those who fought for freedom.

The text is simple and is combined with stunning paintings by award-winning illustrator Ron Lightburn. The familiar poem, “In Flanders Fields,” is included, along with information about the symbolism and history of the poppy and Remembrance Day – all geared towards helping parents and teachers explain the significance of past and present wars and Canada’s peacekeeping missions.”

7. Remembrance Day / Liz Gogerly

Looking back at the First and Second World Wars, this book investigates the origins of Remembrance Day, and how its significance has grown to incorporate conflicts up to the present day. Explaining why we wear poppies, the book goes on to explore what Remembrance Day means for people today and describes the work of the British Legion.

8. Proud as a peacock, brave as a lion / Jane Barclay; illustrated by Renné Benoit

“Much has been written about war and remembrance, but very little of it has been for young children. As questions come from a young grandchild, his grandpa talks about how, as a very young man, he was as proud as a peacock in uniform, busy as a beaver on his Atlantic crossing, and brave as a lion charging into battle”.

9. Hana’s suitcase anniversary album / by Karen Levine

“A biography of a Czech girl who died in the Holocaust, told in alternating chapters with an account of how the curator of a Japanese Holocaust center learned about her life after Hana’s suitcase was sent to her.”

10. Hana’s suitcase / Karen Levine
“In the spring of 2000, Fumiko Ishioka, the curator of a Holocaust education center in Tokyo, received an empty suitcase from the Auschwitz museum. From the moment she saw it, Fumiko was captivated by the writing on the outside of the suitcase, which identified its owner: “Hana Brady, May 16, 1931, Waisenkind” (the German word for orphan). Children visiting the center were full of questions. Who was Hana Brady? Where did she come from? What happened to her? Fueled by their curiosity, Fumiko began a year of detective work, scouring the world for clues.

Writer Karen Levine follows Fumiko in her search, from present-day Japan, Europe and North America back to 1938 Czechoslovakia and the young Hana Brady, a fun-loving child with a passion for ice-skating. Together with Fumiko, we learn of Hana’s loving parents and older brother, George, and discover how the family’s happy life in a small town was turned upside down by the invasion of the Nazis. Full of mystery, Hana’s story comes to life through the eyes of Fumiko and later her brother George, who now lives in Canada. Photographs and original wartime documents enhance a journey that bridges cultures, generations and time. The introduction is by Archbishop Desmond Tutu.”

11. The last train: a Holocaust story / by Rona Arato

“The Last Train is the harrowing true story about young brothers Paul and Oscar Arato and their mother, Lenke, surviving the Nazi occupation during the final years of World War II.

Living in the town of Karcag, Hungary, the Aratos feel insulated from the war — even as it rages all around them. Hungary is allied with Germany to protect its citizens from invasion, but in 1944 Hitler breaks his promise to keep the Nazis out of Hungary.

The Nazi occupation forces the family into situations of growing panic and fear: first into a ghetto in their hometown; then a labor camp in Austria; and, finally, to the deadly Bergen Belsen camp deep in the heart of Germany. Separated from their father, 6-year-old Paul and 11-year-old Oscar must care for their increasingly sick mother, all while trying to maintain some semblance of normalcy amid the horrors of the camp.

In the spring of 1945, the boys see British planes flying over the camp, and a spark of hope that the war will soon end ignites. And then, they are forced onto a dark, stinking boxcar by the Nazi guards. After four days on the train, the boys are convinced they will be killed, but through a twist of fate, the train is discovered and liberated by a battalion of American soldiers marching through Germany.

The book concludes when Paul, now a grown man living in Canada, stumbles upon photographs on the internet of his train being liberated. After writing to the man who posted the pictures, Paul is presented with an opportunity to meet his rescuers at a reunion in New York — but first he must decide if he is prepared to reopen the wounds of his past.
“The Last Train is the harrowing true story about young brothers Paul and Oscar Arato and their mother, Lenke, surviving the Nazi occupation during the final years of World War II.”

12. To hope and back: the journey of the St. Louis / Kathy Kacer

“Lisa and Sol board the luxury ship St. Louis in Hamburg, Germany, on May 13, 1939. Lisa and her family are in first class; Sol and his parents are below in tourist class. The children have mixed feelings–they’re excited to be beginning this voyage to a better life and sad to be leaving their old lives behind. They are Jewish, as are almost all of the 937 passengers on board, and although war has not been officially declared in Europe, the Nazis have been persecuting Jews for years. As they set sail for Cuba, the atmosphere on the ship is optimistic, led by the German captain Gustave Shröder, who is determined to see his passengers to safety. But as they learn that Hitler’s propaganda has turned the country against them, the mood changes to despair. They are turned away–first from Cuba, then the United States, and then Canada.

The story of Lisa and Sol is set against the tragic true history of the St. Louis. Denied entry from port after port, the captain was forced to return his Jewish passengers to Europe, where many died in the Holocaust. Through the eyes of Sol and Lisa, we see the injustice and heartbreak that were caused by the prejudice and hatred of so many.”

13. No pretty pictures: a child of war / Anita Lobel

‘The beloved Caldecott Honor artist now recounts a tale of vastly different kind — her own achingly potent memoir of a childhood of flight, imprisonment, and uncommon bravery in Nazi-occupied Poland. Anita Lobel was barely five when the war began and sixteen by the time she came to America from Sweden, where she had been sent to recover at the end of the war. This haunting book, illustrated with the author’s archival photographs, is the remarkable account of her life during those years. Poised, forthright, and always ready to embrace life, Anita Lobel is the main character in the most personal story she will ever tell.The beloved Caldecott Honor artist now recounts a tale of vastly different kind — her own achingly potent memoir of a childhood of flight, imprisonment, and uncommon bravery in Nazi-occupied Poland. Anita Lobel was barely five when the war began and sixteen by the time she came to America from Sweden, where she had been sent to recover at the end of the war. This haunting book, illustrated with the author’s archival photographs, is the remarkable account of her life during those years. Poised, forthright, and always ready to embrace life, Anita Lobel is the main character in the most personal story she will ever tell.”

 

14. Faces of courage: young heroes of World War II / by Sally M. Rogow

“Depicts the struggle for survival by brave young people who risked their lives to defy the Nazis. There is Kirsten, a young Danish girl who helped save a group of Jewish children from the clutches of the Nazis. Yojo, a Gypsy teenager, guided downed British pilots over the Pyrenees Mountains to freedom in Spain. Jacques, a blind French teenager, organised a student resistance group called Volunteers of Liberty. The Eidelweiss Pirates were German teenagers who opposed the Hitler Youth and aided homeless Jewish children and runways. And Jacob, a young Pole, concealed his Jewish identity and went to work in a German armament factory. Three of the stories relate the heroics of real people; the others are about fictional characters but are based on documented events..”

15. Rescuing the children: the story of the Kindertransport / by Deborah Hodge

“This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War 2. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain.

The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is illustrated with archival photographs, paintings of pre-war Nazi Germany by artist, Hans Jackson, and original art by the Kinder commemorating their rescue.”

16. Passage to freedom: the Sugihara story / written by Ken Mochizuki; illustrated by Dom  Lee; afterword by Hiroki Sugihara

“The true story of Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese Schindler, who, with his family’s encouragement, saved thousands of Jews in Lithuania during World War II.

As a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania in the 1940s, Chiune Sugihara had a chance to help thousands of Jews escape the Holocaust through Japan, but it was against his government’s orders. When his five-year-old son Hiroki asked, If we don’t help them, won’t they die? Sugihara decided to assist the refugees.

Based on Hiroki Sugihara’s own words, Passage to Freedom is the first fully illustrated children’s book to tell Sugihara’s heroic story, highlighting his courageous humanity, and the importance of a child’s opinion in his father’s decision.”

The latest UBC Education Library Collection Spotlight highlights both Halloween picture books that can be found at our branch as well as reintroducing the popular Mythical Creatures Digital Colouring book from the “Colour Our Collections” section of the UBC Library website.

From the colouring book:

“Strong in early zoology texts, the collection includes Polish naturalist and physician Jan Jonston’s richly illustrated seventeenth-century texts on animals.”

This particular colouring book was originally released in February 2019 but it pairs well with this year’s Halloween online display.

Please click on the title or book cover to take you to the record in the UBC Library catalogue.

Halloween Picture Books:


The Scarecrow / written by Beth Ferry; illustrated by the Fan Brothers
(2019)
“All the animals know not to mess with old Scarecrow. But when a small, scared crow falls from midair, Scarecrow does the strangest thing. He saves the tiny baby crow. Soon a loving bond grows between the two unlikely friends. But is it strong enough to weather the changing of the seasons?”

 


That one spooky night / written by Dan Bar-el; illustrated by David
Huyck. (2012)
“Three strange tales filled with shivery fun occur on a dark, spooky night and include the stories of a broom that goes in search of a witch, mermaids who swim in a bathtub and a house party that turns unexpectedly batty.”

 


Yo ho ho, Halloween! / by Pam Muñoz Ryan; illustrated by Edwin
Fotheringham. (2016)
“Halloween is coming! This year, Tony Baloney wants to stand out in the crowd at the school Halloween parade. But can he keep his costume intact until the day of the parade?”

 


Leah’s mustache party / by Nadia Mike; illustrated by Charlene Chua.
(2016)
“At Leah’s moustache party, everyone gets in on the dress-up fun, even Grandma!”

 


This is the house that monsters built / by Steve Metzger; illustrated by
Jared Lee. (2016)
“Using the building verse of the original nursery rhyme, a mummy, a skeleton, a zombie, and other monsters create a house.”

 


Black and bittern was night / [text by] Robert Heidbreder ; [illustrations
by] John Martz. (2013)
“When skeletons take over a small town, the grown-ups call off trick-or-treating, but the kids in town vow to save the day.”


Duck, duck, dinosaur: perfect pumpkin / written by Kallie George ;
illustrated by Oriol Vidal. (2017)
“Duck-and-dino siblings Feather, Flap, and Spike visit the pumpkin patch together to find the perfect pumpkin to decorate for Halloween.”

 


Trick-or-treat, smell my feet! / Lisa Desimini. (2005)
“When twin witches Delia and Ophelia cook up a mischievous spell for Halloween, a mysterious ingredient causes the potion to backfire.”

 


The walking bathroom / words by Shauntay Grant; art by Erin Bennett
Banks (2017)
“It’s Halloween and Amayah doesn’t have a costume to wear to school. She dressed as a ghost for the last three years in a row, witches are overdone, and fairies are not her style. She wants to be something different, something creative, something no one else in the world has ever been in the history of Halloween.”

 


The ghosts go spooking / Chrissy Bozik; illustrated by Patricia
Storms. (2015)
“Little ghosts go trick-or-treating by ones, twos, and up to ten in this spooky and fun-filled take on “The Ants Go Marching.”

 


Jazlyn J & a screen of a Halloween / written by Renná Bruce ;
illustrations by Janet Shultis; illustration colouring and page design by
Kevin Strang & Whitney Strang. (2014)
“Jazlyn J and her friends through their Halloween was ruined. They had no idea it would turn out to be one they would never forget!”

 


Me and my dragon: scared of Halloween / David Biedrzycki. (2013)
“A boy tries to find the perfect Halloween costume for his pet dragon, so they can go trick-or-treating together.”

 


The graveyard hounds / by Vi Hughes; illustrations by Christina Leist.
(2008)
“When the dogs in town lose their barks, Mike and Annie set out to solve the mystery.”

 


Boo! / by Robert Munsch; illustrated by Michael Martchenko. (2004)
“It’s Halloween, and Lance decides to paint his face to make it the scariest ever. He makes his face so scary that when the adults answer the door they fall over in fright!”

 


One terrible Halloween / Mary Labatt. (2002)
“Sam: Dog Detective is bored. There are no ghosts in her house, no monsters, no mysteries! Luckily, Halloween is only a week away; soon Woodford will be crawling with vampires, goblins, mutants and witches.”

The current Collection Spotlight highlights books about Thanksgiving and themes referencing gratitude. Please click on the title or book cover to take you to the record in the UBC Library catalogue.  Our Seasons and Celebrations booklist can be accessed for a list of selected teacher resources, picture books, and non-fiction related to different community celebrations throughout the year.


If you’re thankful and you know it / Chrissy Bozik; illustrated by Patricia Storms.
This Thanksgiving celebration is versioned on “If you’re happy and you know it.” Here, families, neighbours and friends gather to give thanks for everything the season has to offer: from changing leaves to turkey and pies; from a hockey game to a cozy sweater. And most of all, for the warm memories of time spent together with loved ones. A perfect reminder any time of the year of the things that are important, and to stop and be grateful.


Step forward with gratitude / Shannon Welbourn.
This helpful book provides ideas, practical tips, and inspiring stories about how you can make expressing gratitude a regular habit. Discover how showing your appreciation and returning kindness to others is a rewarding experience that will enrich your life


There, there / written by Tim Beiser; illustrated by Bill Slavin.
It’s raining, and Rabbit whines, he complains, he moans, he grumps … until Bear has had enough! He decides it’s time for Rabbit to learn to appreciate what he has. Using nothing but the lowly common earthworm as an example, he teaches Rabbit a lesson about taking things for granted.


Lighting our world: a year of celebrations / written by Catherine Rondina; illustrated by Jacqui Oakley.
Throughout the year and around the globe, people use light — candles, bonfires, lanterns and fireworks — to celebrate special occasions. This richly illustrated book is an illuminating tour of the world’s brightest and warmest festivities.


Willa and the bear / by Philomena O’Neill.
A touching tale about a girl, her lost doll, and a bear who brings them back together.


The Thank You Book / by Mo Willems
In The Thank You Book, Piggie wants to thank EVERYONE. But Gerald is worried Piggie will forget someone . . . someone important.


Hello, harvest moon / by Ralph Fletcher; illustrated by Kate Kiesler.
Poetic prose describes a full autumn moon and the magical effect it has on the earth, plants, animals, and people around it.


The autumn equinox: celebrating the harvest / Ellen Jackson; illustrated by Jan Davey Ellis.
Discusses the significance of some of the harvest festivals around the world and describes how they are celebrated.


We are all dots: a big plan for a better world / Giancarlo Macri, Carolina Zanotti.
When a set of prosperous dots on one page and another set of impoverished dots on the other meet, readers are taken through their struggle to bridge their differences.


The wish tree / words by Kyo Maclear; pictures by Chris Turnham.
In winter Charles and his trusty toboggan set out to find the wish tree, and along the way, he helps to make the wishes of his friends Squirrel, Fox, and Beaver come true.


Harvest days: celebrating fall with rhymes, songs, projects, games, and snacks /written and compiled by Durby Peterson; illustrated by Marion Hopping Ekberg.


Grateful / story by Marion Mutala; illustrations by E.R.
A little girl and her mother share a conversation over many years, as the child complains about the injustices of her young life, and the mother reminds her not to lament what she doesn’t have, but to cherish what she does.


The secret of saying thanks / Douglas Wood; illustrated by Greg Shed
While learning the secret to a good life, a child says thank you for the natural world and for being loved, because a grateful heart is always happy.

Featured new children’s books for the month of October.  Click on the book cover or title to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

Follow the moon home: a tale of one idea, twenty kids, and a hundred sea turtles / by Philippe Cousteau and Deborah Hopkinson; illustrated by Meilo So
QL666.C536 C68 2016

Out of the ice: how climate change is revealing the past / written by Claire Eamer; illustrated by Drew Shannon
CC77.I2 E26 2018

Plantcookeat!: a children’s cookbook / Joe Archer and Caroline Craig
TX801 .A73 2018

Featured new resources for the month of October.  Click on the book cover or title to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

A revolutionary subject : pedagogy of women of color and indigeneity / Lilia D. Monzó.
LC3715 .M66 2019

The digital citizenship handbook for school leaders : fostering positive interactions online / Mike Ribble and Marty Park.
LC1091 .R63 2019

Culturally and linguistically responsive education : designing networks that transform schools / edited by Martin Scanlan, Cristina Hunter, Elizabeth R. Howard.
LC1099.3 .C8434 2019


Orange Shirt Day is September 30. Below you will find resources that may be requested from UBC Education Library. X̱wi7x̱wa Library’s “Indian Residential School System in Canada” research guide also includes materials that address the reality of the Indian Residential Schools. Many contain additional resources for teaching or encouraging discussion at home.

Fiction


The orange shirt story / author, Phyllis
Webstad; illustrations, Brock Nicol.
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=9294317

 


I am not a number / written by Jenny Kay Dupuis and Kathy
Kacer; illustrated by Gillian Newland.
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=8536611

 


Stolen words / written by Melanie
Florence; illustrated by Gabrielle Grimard.
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=9161137

 


When we were alone / David Alexander
Robertson; Julie Flett.
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=8774028

 


Shi-
shietko / Nicola I. Campbell; pictures by Kim La Fave.
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=3559311

 


Shin-chi’s canoe
, written by Nicola I. Campbell, illustrated by Kim LaFave
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=3935868

 


Fatty
legs: a true story / Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak-Fenton; artwork by Liz Amini-Holmes.
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=4297323

 


You hold me up / Monique Gray Smith and Danielle Daniel.
http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=8926213

FULL TEXT ONLINE:  http://tinyurl.com/yys2eaqn

 

Non-Fiction


Speaking our
truth: a journey of reconciliation / Monique Gray Smith.
FULL TEXT ONLINE:  http://tinyurl.com/yy3a7d7v

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