Visit us for research help, to see our  collections, or to find a place to study. At Xwi7xwa Library everyone is welcome!

UBC Library presents, in partnership with UBC Forestry and the Simon K. Y. Lee Global Lounge and Resource Centre, a conversation with Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer on Friday, January 29 (1:00 -2:30 p.m. PST). The acclaimed author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants will be joined by moderators, Dr. Daniel Heath Justice and Corrina Sparrow to discuss the author’s influence on multidisciplinary understandings of her work and how readers can integrate this into our connections with land and each other through our respective disciplinary lenses.

Date and time: Friday, January 29 (1:00 -2:30 p.m. PST)

Location: Online

Register now: https://bit.ly/2Li75xO

Have a particular question for the author? Submit your questions here:  https://ubc.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6L7JxLNWciJrmIZ 

Forest (Reads) Initiative Course:

Forest(Reads) is a joint initiative between the Faculty of Forestry’s Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Council and the Associate Dean, Academic of the Faculty. The Initiative has a canvas course that anyone with a UBC affiliation can register in, which can be accessed here (https://canvas.ubc.ca/courses/69762).

The course allows participants access to discussion boards as well as access links for our zoom conversations. Participants in the course will be entered in a book draw in early February for a few copies of Braiding Sweetgrass!

For UBC e-book copies & background bios see here.

Online workshop for UBC Indigenous Students, Staff, Faculty & Community members. Registration full & closed. 

Updates

The first workshop has been rescheduled for March 5 & 12 due to unforeseen circumstances; we apologize for any scheduling conflicts and thank participants for their patience!

Should you have any questions or need to cancel please contact: Tamis.cochrane@ubc.ca or Karleen.delaurier-lyle@ubc.ca

Preparing for your workshop:

  • Soak the hide two days prior to the workshop. Immerse in water in a container.
  • You will need:
    • a small container to pour the sand in the rattle, after it’s been sewn. Such as a bead bottle, or a 1/4 measuring cup, or an empty medicine bottle (something of that nature) or a spoon will work but it will take much longer to fill
    • a blunt end of a paintbrush, or wooden kitchen spoon, as long as it’s not sharp and thinner than the dowel (stick provided in the package). This will be used to push the sand down in the rattle
    • a second small container or bowl to put the sand in while you fill the rattle; this is not necessary but much easier than the bag with sand
    • may need a scissors (just in case)

About this Event

What: Indigenous Rattle-Making Workshop

When: 2 Workshop offerings: Each Workshop requires 2 dates, spaced 1 week apart. The first meeting is for rattle assembly, with a week waiting period to allow the rattles to fully dry, and the second meeting to complete / finish off the rattles and paint them if you wish.

1. February 23 & March 2nd 10am-12pm

2. March 5 & 12 10am-12pm

Who: Indigenous UBC Students, faculty & staff, as well as Musqueam Community members.

Cost: $0. Costs are covered by workshop sponsors, but spaces are limited.

Facilitator: Shevonne Hall is a Mohawk/Ojibway artist who lives and works in the Musqueam Community.

“I believe art is medicine that can help with the healing of Indigenous Peoples trauma. Over the past three decades, I have learnt a variety of traditional art forms that I now teach. In doing so, I am part of the seventh generation that reawakens the spirit of our Ancestors.” – (Artist Statement)

Shevonne reinvests proceeds from her art towards purchasing art supplies for Indigenous youth programs in remote / rural Indigenous communities across Canada where access to art stores or supplies is limited and where the cost of shipping for online purchases is prohibitive.

Sponsors: Karleen Delaurier-Lyle & Tamis Cochrane, Xwi7xwa Library, and Health, Wellbeing and Benefits from Human Resources at UBC.

NOTE ON THE RATTLE MEDIUM: The rattles are made with genuine animal hides. This may not be suitable for anyone who is unable to work with hides for personal concerns.

Register here! Join us January 19, 2021 from 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Xwi7xwa Library’s Research Guides  are a collection of resources gathered to support common questions we receive from patrons. Patterned patron curiosity informs what topics Xwi7xwa’s guides cover but they must also speak to an individual’s relationship to the topic, therefore the scope of perspectives the guides connect to are broad. One of the main goals of our guides are to place Indigenous knowledges, perspectives, and pedagogy at the forefront of beginning to answer researcher curiosity. This session will cover what research guides are, why specific guides have been created, and how we think responsibly about the information we gather and give.

 

 

Xwi7xwa Library is pleased to present our Critical Indigenous Literacy kits for children’s picture books. You can find our kits online by visiting the Critical Indigenous Literacy tab here.

Critical literacy requires us to go beyond what we read on the page and to consider the larger narrative in which a text is situated, asking questions about who created a text and why. Critical Indigenous literacy asks us to think about authorship and identity in relation to the stories and teachings we trust as readers. It also asks readers to think critically about Indigenous representations (or lack thereof) within a text.

We would like to acknowledge that this work would not be possible without: Emily Fornwald, Stephanie Marston, and Wendy Traas from the UBC Education Library; Sajni Lacey from the UBC Okanagan Library; and Natalie Trapuzzano Lindsey Bennett the student librarians that assisted us.

Creative Commons Licence
Critical Indigenous Literacy for Children’s Picture Books by Xwi7xwa Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Dear friends and colleagues,​

 

2020 has been a year like no other.  It has encouraged us all to reimagine how we work and get creative and collaborative.  During this year we have seen the arrival of two new Indigenous librarians to the Xwi7xwa team.  Kayla Lar-Son has joined us from Treaty 6 territory and Karleen Delaurier-Lyle’s position has been made ongoing.  Onboarding and team building while working remotely from each other has encouraged us to use the creative side of our brain and to innovate how we do these things in a good way.  ​

Xwi7xwa would like to wish each & every one of you a safe & happy Holiday season in Łingít, Inuktitut, Mi’kmaw, Michif, Cree, Siksiká, and hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓, as well as English, from the traditional territories of the Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish, Semiahmoo, Kwantlen, Katzie, and Mi’kmaq nations.  Through this we recognize our identities as well as acknowledge our positionality as guests on these territories. ​

Wishing all our relations a safe & happy holiday season.  We hope to see you back in the library in 2021.

Are citation practices fair to Indigenous scholars? Who scholars cite, how scholars cite, and what sources are considered authoritative to cite can validate and legitimize knowledge or oppress knowledge. Frequently, Indigenous ways of knowing (oral teachings and histories in particular) are delegitimized in academia by citational politics. In this session, learn more about “citational politics,” the existing templates for citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers, and about the current initiatives at X̱wi7x̱wa to further legitimize citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers in academia.

Participants will be able to:

    • Discuss the concept of “citational politics,” including how Indigenous traditional knowledge is devalued in academia through dominant citational practices and how we can challenge these practices
    • Recognize and create existing templates for citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers
    • Be aware of current initiatives at X̱wi7x̱wa Library and elsewhere to create a Chicago style template for citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers

When: October 22 at 3PM-4:30PM PST

Facilitated by Bronwen McKie: A student Librarian at X̱wi7x̱wa Library and a senior MASLIS candidate at the UBC iSchool. Bronwen’s values of community, collaboration, and equitable access to information guide her professional interests in scholarly communication & publishing and reference and instruction librarianship. Bronwen also enjoys writing, staying active and planning vacations she can’t afford. She is a settler of Welsh heritage, but was born and raised in Mi’kma’ki (Nova Scotia).

Registration: https://events.ctlt.ubc.ca/events/decolonizing-citations-october-22-2020/

Science Literacy Week Sept 21-27, 2020

Xwi7xwa Library is participating in this year’s Science Literacy Week 2020! Branches across UBC Library will be hosting online workshops, curating reading lists, and sharing fun films on this year’s topic: Biodiversity!

See the collective research guide here! And join the conversation

    

Join the conversation!
@ubclibrary #scilit20 #bc

Xwi7xwa Library has gathered some resources highlighting the work of Ronald “Bud” Sparrow. Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and community during this time. Sparrow’s influence on Canada’s understanding of Aboriginal fishing will continue in others’ work. Please contact the branch with research related questions if you do not find what you are looking for below.

Musqueam Community: Learn more about Bud Sparrow and his legacy

Online Resources

Hard-copy Resources

Research Guides

Xwi7xwa Library would like to thank Bronte Burnette, our recent student librarian, for all her hard work and contributions during her time with us!

Burnette moved to Vancouver from Montana and joined our team while working on her MLIS at UBC’s iSchool. She has since graduated from the program and is the Educational Resource Developer at the Centre for Teaching and Learning!

Although she will be missed, our team looks forward to collaborating with her in her new position! Bronte has left us us with a reflection on her time with us:

As I look at my time at Xwi7xwa Library, I see that every day I learned something new: from the staff, from the patrons, from conversations, and from moments that were set aside to really make sure I understood what I was doing. The projects I was assigned or created for myself gave me a solid foundation in disseminating Indigenous knowledge in a respectful way and illustrated the importance of reciprocity, community, and place in knowledge keeping. These three components are something that I will carry into all my career in librarianship, not just in roles working with Indigenous knowledge, but all knowledge.

I understood from previous work the importance of community involvement and hearing/seeing reciprocity at work in both my FNCC classes and at Xwi7xwa, I realized it’s importance in all librarianship, but especially academic librarianship and academic relationships. I want to print it out and put it on my figurative desk as I begin my work at CTLT, so I can see it every day. Learning about the importance of place though, and the importance of land is something that I didn’t expect. And now, it’s a part of knowledge keeping that I share with patrons in each reference interview I do. Place influences all knowledge; not just Indigenous knowledge, and it’s something that I think I could only fully learn and understand after working at Xwi7xwa. I don’t think a class would have given me the same view.

My favourite projects have been the online research guides and the blog posts because it’s been a way for me to share out our collection and resources without the barrier of a reference desk or a way to the library. And I love the fact that people can access them at any time, whether or not we are open. They gave me a chance to hone my librarianship skills too in searching databases, using Boolean, understand how to use Summon, and research skills in general. The blog posts gave me a challenge to learn a lot about what is actually in the collection, how many books and the kinds of books we have. It was one of the things that was something that I thought of as a “real” librarian job: selecting and highlighting books with short descriptions.

Learning from all the staff at the library has been the absolute highlight of my MLIS. Karleen has been a cheerleader, supporter, and advocate for me in all the best possible ways: challenging me in my work, asking for my help and opinion, guiding me, answering all of my many questions. She’s been the best supervisor I could ask for. Karleen’s attitude that librarians don’t just have a duty to fill information gaps, but can educate people is another idea that I want printed out for my desk. Bronwen, as my other half of our student librarian team, has been the most supportive co-worker in coursework and sharing projects at the branch, and having her learn with me has been a way she has taught me. Tamis taught me so much about communicating with patrons in reference interviews on the desk, and on the importance of making community and work-place connections. Eleanore showed me patience and kindness, whether it was answering my many questions about cataloguing and the collection, or teaching me a small amount of her knowledge on how collections/acquisitions work, even though I wasn’t a TS student librarian. Thanks for always encouraging my “Why is this an anthology?” questions. Kayla, though we didn’t work together for long, thank you for teaching me about data sovereignty and on the beginnings of how to build a course. Every conversation I had with Sarah left me with new knowledge of how to be a better librarian, up to our last zoom meeting. In our conversations, she illustrated to me different ways of thinking about knowledge keeping, and librarianship as a whole.

These words aren’t enough, but it has been a complete privilege to work with all the library staff at Xwi7xwa and learn from and with you all. I will be bringing all these teachings and much more with me to CTLT and in my career as a librarian. Thank you for the opportunity to work at Xwi7xwa with you all. I am honoured and humbled to have worked with you all in this important work.

Sincerely,

Bronte Burnette

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet