Xwi7xwa Library has a wide range of carefully curated library research guides (also known as libguides), covering everything from Aboriginal Filmmakers to Indigenous Education K-12. These guides are particularly helpful places to start when looking for information about a specific disciple or subject area. Visit the portal to see all Xwi7xwa Library authored libguides.

Xwi7xwa Library is open from 9 to 5, Monday to Friday, with reference support between 11 and 3.  

 

On April 9, 2018, UBC hosted a ceremony to officially open the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre. At the ceremony, Professor Santa Ono issued a Statement of Apology for UBC’s involvement in the system (see for coverage/responses).

 

The Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre is one of two UBC initiatives that aim to capture the long trajectory of Indigenous and Canadian relations and to ensure that one part of that, the history of Canada’s Indian residential schools, will never be forgotten. The other initiative, Reconciliation Pole, was installed on campus in April 2017.

 

The centre provides Indian residential school survivors, their families, and communities access to the records gathered by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). The TRC documented the history and abusive nature of the Indian residential school system that operated in Canada for more than a hundred years.

 

A second function of the centre is to inform faculty, staff, students, and other visitors, about the history and lasting effects of the Indian residential school system, and to help them to understand larger patterns in history as a context for thinking about contemporary issues and relationships.

 

Edited by: Karleen Delaurier-Lyle

Culture at the Centre is new exhibition at the Museum of Anthropology that insight into the “important work Indigenous-run cultural centres and museums in British Columbia are doing to honour and support their culture, history and language. Five centres are showcased, representing six communities: Musqueam Cultural Education Centre (Musqueam), Squamish-Lil’wat Cultural Centre (Squamish, Lil’wat), Heiltsuk Cultural Education Centre (Heiltsuk), Nisg̱a’a Museum (Nisg̱a’a) and Haida Gwaii Museum and Haida Heritage Centre at Kay Llnagaay (Haida).” [MOA]

The exhibition is organized around three main themes: land and language, continuity and communities, and repatriation and reconciliation, and runs until October 8th, 2018. To learn more, visit the Museum of Anthropology website here. 

 

According to the 2018 University of British Columbia Course Calendar and departmental course descriptions, there are 6 courses, from 3 departments, not including First Nations and Indigenous Studies, that contain a significant amount of Indigenous content and are being offered for Summer 2018. These departments are Education, First Nations and Endangered Languages, and History.

Education

EDUC 141 (3) Indigenous Studies (POINT, MARNY)

For students in the Indigenous Teacher Education Program (NITEP) only.

EDUC 440 (3) Aboriginal Education in Canada (multiple sections)

No course description available.

EDUC 442A (1) Critical Issues in Indigenous Education (TBA)

Post-practicum students will explore how a school program may need to be modified in order to integrate more fully First Nations history, content, and worldviews.

 

First Nations Languages

FNEL 480A (3) Endangered Language Documentation and Revitalization (TBA)

Critical study of the historical, social, cultural, political, and economic factors impact on language loss, retention, and revival. Research on and application of methodologies for collaborative, trans-disciplinary, community-based documentation and revitalization of BC’s Indigenous linguistic heritage.

 

History

HIST 326 (3) Canada Since 1945: Affluence and Anxiety in the Atomic Age (Borys, David)

Includes immigration policy; the welfare state; Aboriginal peoples; the Cold War; resource economies and national politics; continentalism and free trade; constitutional crises; conflicting nationalisms; and new social movements. Credit will only be granted for one of HIST 326 or 426, if 426 was taken before 2007W.

HIST 339 (3) The United States, 1945 to the Present: The Limits of Power (Paris, Leslie)

American military and geo-political power during and after Cold War; wars in Korea, Vietnam, and Middle East; domestic issues including McCarthyism, social movements (blacks, women, youth, gays.

You can download the course list here.UBC Courses with Indigenous Content Summer 2018

 

 

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