Continuing with our review of data visualization tools, we now introduce you four more tools that aim to satisfy very different user needs.

Datawrapper

Datawrapper is ideal if you want to create a professionally looking graph in a few minutes. Originally envisioned for world-class journalists, Datawrapper is an open source project supported by ABZV and developed by Journalism++ Cologne. This tool enables anyone to create graphic design-like visualizations in four simple steps, without any programming skills. 

Datawrapper offers only 10 of the most common chart types, including tables and maps, with the option to upload data from Excel, CSVs, PDFs or the web. Charts become interactive and readable even on mobile devices.

Technically, you can create charts from files with thousands of rows; however, as today’s browsers are not fast enough, the chart would render very slow. For more information on how to prepare your data for Datawrapper, visit this tutorial.  

Datawrapper provides no free hosting services: you have to manually download the chart or map you have created and then upload this chart to a webpage, blog or CMS. With the free version, you can download charts as ZIP. The paid version also allows embedding charts in your website.

Visit the public gallery to see the charts that other users have created recently. 

RAW

Defining itself as ‘the missing link between spreadsheet applications and vector graphics editors’, RAW is a very different type of open web tool. RAW was developed at the DensityDesign Research Lab (Politecnico di Milano) to create custom vector-based visualizations on top of the D3.js library. In other words, you will not find standard line and bar graphs in Raw’s library of 16 chart types.

Similar to Tableau, RAW is a very intuitive tool that allows mapping the information in a drag-and-drop style. Take a peek at this video tutorial to see RAW in action.   

RAW works with CSV and TSV files as well as with copied-and-pasted texts from other applications like Microsoft Excel. Visualizations can be exported in SVG or PNG format and embedded in your web page.

RAW encourages users to suggest new layouts and share their work, offering an API to create and edit charts. Moreover, RAW can also be run locally on your machine. Regardless, all data uploaded to RAW is processed only by the web browser. No server-side operations or storages are performed. This means that no one will be able to see, touch or copy your data.

Plotly

Plotly is an easy-to-use web app that allows users to not only create charts and dashboards online, but also conduct serious statistical analysis. It is cloud-based and works with any data or file type including Excel, Python, MATLAB, R, SAS, and SPSS.

Plotly offers a vast collection of chart types –including amazing 3D graphs– that can be created either with APIs or web app. You can edit anything about a graph and embed it in an iframe in your blog, Notebook, or website. Check these tutorials for assistance.

With Plotly, you can control your privacy and sharing. Public sharing is completely free.

Something very unique about Plotly is that you can stream data into graphs using APIs, an Arduino or Raspberry Pi, or an IPython Notebook.

Timeline JS

As the name indicates, this tool is different from the ones we have introduced before in that it allows you to create timelines with your chronological information. Developed by Zach Wise and the Knight Lab, TimelineJS is a free, open-source tool used by popular websites such as Time and Radiolab. 

With this tool you can generate timelines that work well on a desktop screen or mobile device in four easy steps. Watch this tutorial for more information.  

TimelineJS can pull in media from a variety of sources including Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Vimeo, Vine, Dailymotion, Google Maps, Wikipedia, SoundCloud, and Document Cloud.

Applications & Software

Continuing with our review of data visualization tools, we now introduce you four more tools that aim to satisfy very different user needs.

Datawrapper

Datawrapper is ideal if you want to create a professionally looking graph in a few minutes. Originally envisioned for world-class journalists, Datawrapper is an open source project supported by ABZV and developed by Journalism++ Cologne. This tool enables anyone to create graphic design-like visualizations in four simple steps, without any programming skills. 

Datawrapper offers only 10 of the most common chart types, including tables and maps, with the option to upload data from Excel, CSVs, PDFs or the web. Charts become interactive and readable even on mobile devices.

Technically, you can create charts from files with thousands of rows; however, as today’s browsers are not fast enough, the chart would render very slow. For more information on how to prepare your data for Datawrapper, visit this tutorial.  

Datawrapper provides no free hosting services: you have to manually download the chart or map you have created and then upload this chart to a webpage, blog or CMS. With the free version, you can download charts as ZIP. The paid version also allows embedding charts in your website.

Visit the public gallery to see the charts that other users have created recently. 

RAW

Defining itself as ‘the missing link between spreadsheet applications and vector graphics editors’, RAW is a very different type of open web tool. RAW was developed at the DensityDesign Research Lab (Politecnico di Milano) to create custom vector-based visualizations on top of the D3.js library. In other words, you will not find standard line and bar graphs in Raw’s library of 16 chart types.

Similar to Tableau, RAW is a very intuitive tool that allows mapping the information in a drag-and-drop style. Take a peek at this video tutorial to see RAW in action.   

RAW works with CSV and TSV files as well as with copied-and-pasted texts from other applications like Microsoft Excel. Visualizations can be exported in SVG or PNG format and embedded in your web page.

RAW encourages users to suggest new layouts and share their work, offering an API to create and edit charts. Moreover, RAW can also be run locally on your machine. Regardless, all data uploaded to RAW is processed only by the web browser. No server-side operations or storages are performed. This means that no one will be able to see, touch or copy your data.

Plotly

Plotly is an easy-to-use web app that allows users to not only create charts and dashboards online, but also conduct serious statistical analysis. It is cloud-based and works with any data or file type including Excel, Python, MATLAB, R, SAS, and SPSS.

Plotly offers a vast collection of chart types –including amazing 3D graphs– that can be created either with APIs or web app. You can edit anything about a graph and embed it in an iframe in your blog, Notebook, or website. Check these tutorials for assistance.

With Plotly, you can control your privacy and sharing. Public sharing is completely free.

Something very unique about Plotly is that you can stream data into graphs using APIs, an Arduino or Raspberry Pi, or an IPython Notebook.

Timeline JS

As the name indicates, this tool is different from the ones we have introduced before in that it allows you to create timelines with your chronological information. Developed by Zach Wise and the Knight Lab, TimelineJS is a free, open-source tool used by popular websites such as Time and Radiolab. 

With this tool you can generate timelines that work well on a desktop screen or mobile device in four easy steps. Watch this tutorial for more information.  

TimelineJS can pull in media from a variety of sources including Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Vimeo, Vine, Dailymotion, Google Maps, Wikipedia, SoundCloud, and Document Cloud.

Applications & Software

Data can be hard to manipulate and translate into a user-friendly graphical format. In this blog post series we will review different data visualization tools that will help you unlock the insights hidden in raw data. More importantly, these tools will allow you to answer many business and market questions and tell a compelling story to partners, employees, customers, and investors.      

Tableau Public

Tableau was created with a very straightforward mission “To help people see and understand data.” In this manner, two computer science disciplines were brought together for the first time: computer graphics and databases. In fact, one of the minds behind Tableau is also a founding member of Pixar.

Tableau Public is a free service for Mac and Windows that lets anyone create and share interactive charts and graphs, maps and live dashboards. Designed for ordinary people, the software is very intuitive. No programming skills of any kind are required. Simply drag and drop data into the canvas and immediately start to see results and answer questions. For help, you can check Tableau’s online tutorial videos and live training.

Tableau is constantly adding new features and enhancing the experience based on users’ suggestions. It has recently released Tableau Desktop, Public Edition 9.2. The new version offers, among other things, Mapbox integration, allowing for great-looking map backgrounds, layers, and context.

Tableau Public offers 10 GB of storage space and works with data from Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, multiple text file formats, statistical files, and web data connectors. Moreover, it does a lot of the work for you in figuring out what the data type is. Per workbook, the limit is 10,000,000 rows of data.  

One thing to take into consideration is that once you publish a workbook to Tableau Public, anyone can view the data. However, you can disable the ability to download the workbook.

If you have a tablet, you can explore data with your hands with Vizable, Tableau’s free app.

Good news for students: You can get a free Tableau Desktop license if you are enrolled full-time at an accredited school anywhere in the world.

Take a look at the gallery to see the many ways in which people are using Tableau.

Google Fusion Tables

Fusion Tables is Google Research’s free experimental application for data management, integration, and collaboration:

  • Visualize hundreds of thousands of rows of data using charts, maps, and graphs.
  • Merge tables and/or combine with public data. Keep track of who owns what by specifying attribution for the data. 
  • Host data online and share it with others just like you do with Google Drive. Most tables are private by default. If not, you can disable the downloading option.  
  • Charts or maps hosted in Fusion Tables will automatically update when you improve your dataset.
  • Although programming skills are not necessary to use this tool, there is an API available for developers who want to build applications over Fusion Tables.

Fusion Tables’ ease of use is intermediate –definitely not as intuitive as Tableau– since mapping and dataset merging can require some effort. For help, a list of tutorials can be found here.

Fusion Tables supports a quota of up to 1 GB per user. You can import different file types including CSV, TSV, KML, Excel, and Google Spreadsheets. There are hard limits of 5,000 columns per table and 1 million characters per cell. For better performance, Fusion Tables recommends keeping the number of columns below one hundred and the total size of data in the row below 1 MB. 

An option to suggest new features is available on the website. However, no new features have been added since 2014.

Check the gallery to see what people are doing with Fusion Tables.

Applications & Software

Data can be hard to manipulate and translate into a user-friendly graphical format. In this blog post series we will review different data visualization tools that will help you unlock the insights hidden in raw data. More importantly, these tools will allow you to answer many business and market questions and tell a compelling story to partners, employees, customers, and investors.      

Tableau Public

Tableau was created with a very straightforward mission “To help people see and understand data.” In this manner, two computer science disciplines were brought together for the first time: computer graphics and databases. In fact, one of the minds behind Tableau is also a founding member of Pixar.

Tableau Public is a free service for Mac and Windows that lets anyone create and share interactive charts and graphs, maps and live dashboards. Designed for ordinary people, the software is very intuitive. No programming skills of any kind are required. Simply drag and drop data into the canvas and immediately start to see results and answer questions. For help, you can check Tableau’s online tutorial videos and live training.

Tableau is constantly adding new features and enhancing the experience based on users’ suggestions. It has recently released Tableau Desktop, Public Edition 9.2. The new version offers, among other things, Mapbox integration, allowing for great-looking map backgrounds, layers, and context.

Tableau Public offers 10 GB of storage space and works with data from Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, multiple text file formats, statistical files, and web data connectors. Moreover, it does a lot of the work for you in figuring out what the data type is. Per workbook, the limit is 10,000,000 rows of data.  

One thing to take into consideration is that once you publish a workbook to Tableau Public, anyone can view the data. However, you can disable the ability to download the workbook.

If you have a tablet, you can explore data with your hands with Vizable, Tableau’s free app.

Good news for students: You can get a free Tableau Desktop license if you are enrolled full-time at an accredited school anywhere in the world.

Take a look at the gallery to see the many ways in which people are using Tableau.

Google Fusion Tables

Fusion Tables is Google Research’s free experimental application for data management, integration, and collaboration:

  • Visualize hundreds of thousands of rows of data using charts, maps, and graphs.
  • Merge tables and/or combine with public data. Keep track of who owns what by specifying attribution for the data. 
  • Host data online and share it with others just like you do with Google Drive. Most tables are private by default. If not, you can disable the downloading option.  
  • Charts or maps hosted in Fusion Tables will automatically update when you improve your dataset.
  • Although programming skills are not necessary to use this tool, there is an API available for developers who want to build applications over Fusion Tables.

Fusion Tables’ ease of use is intermediate –definitely not as intuitive as Tableau– since mapping and dataset merging can require some effort. For help, a list of tutorials can be found here.

Fusion Tables supports a quota of up to 1 GB per user. You can import different file types including CSV, TSV, KML, Excel, and Google Spreadsheets. There are hard limits of 5,000 columns per table and 1 million characters per cell. For better performance, Fusion Tables recommends keeping the number of columns below one hundred and the total size of data in the row below 1 MB. 

An option to suggest new features is available on the website. However, no new features have been added since 2014.

Check the gallery to see what people are doing with Fusion Tables.

Applications & Software

Teja Edara, entrepreneur and UBC MBA student, sits down to talk with us about the foundation of Just Greet in Vancouver, BC. We follow his journey from concept to creation and explore challenges and lessons along the way.

What are the biggest challenges you have encountered in the Vancouver market?

There are two main challenges for any startup no matter the geographical location: financing and human resources. It’s hard to find people who are equally motivated and as a startup you cannot afford to pay that much. Lucky for me, I have a good investing team and MBA alumni from the Sauder School of Business. That made things a lot easier. Then we started to incorporate people one by one. Financing is definitely the biggest challenge in Vancouver. Finding capital is not as easy as if you go to the US. It’s hard to find investors and approach them with what you do.

What are the most valuable lessons you have learned throughout this process?

With investors the first step is getting to know each other and building trust. Successful entrepreneurs are already known in the market and they can access investors easily. For new people, it’s more about building the relationship with investors before even talking about money. I would suggest reaching as many people as possible and getting to know them. There are new angel investors in town every day.

Being an MBA student definitely helps when contacting investors. There are many resources to do so, but I used mainly two: Angel List and LinkedIn.

Angel List is a platform for investors and startups. You can do a very specific search and see who the angel investors present in town are.

You get the names and you can map them out in LinkedIn. Then you can contact them via LinkedIn InMail with 5 or 6 sentences explaining:

  1. Who you are
  2. Your background
  3. What you know about them
  4. Why are you interested in talking to them

You have to be very clear on what you would like to get out of a possible meeting. The chances of getting a reply using a good InMail are one to eight.

When I look for investors, I pay attention to the work they have been doing and the startups they have been supporting. Angel List can definitely help you with that. Investors, on the other side, look if they actually have the right resources to support your venture, such as expertise and contacts.   

Could you walk us through the stages of the startup process?

I came to the MBA program and I wanted to try this great idea out. First, I tested the concept with help from other classmates. I got some feedback and then I understood that even to test the concept I needed a more proper, functional approach and for that I needed some money.

I started reaching out to investors and my mentor and angel investor advised me on how to go step by step establishing my venture: hiring a lawyer, forming a company, determining the share structure, equity, etc. Every investor wants to see proper steps and legalized processes.

To pitch investors you need to understand what the value of your venture is and prepare a pitching deck. We got a lot of support from Sauder alumni and even one of the professors joined as investor and advisor. It’s a mix of the whole startup community out there including other known Sauder startups such as Recon Instruments and Kiip.

About Teja Edara

Teja is a serial entrepreneur with more than four years of experience in marketing, sales and management consulting. He has worked with multiple stakeholders extensively in India and the United Kingdom. Having created and operated successful ventures in outdoor advertising and e-commerce in the Indian market, he has developed great expertise in sales, strategy and customer experience in a start up environment.

Teja Edara, entrepreneur and UBC MBA student, sits down to talk with us about the foundation of Just Greet in Vancouver, BC. We follow his journey from concept to creation and explore challenges and lessons along the way.

Tell us about your business

Just Greet is an online platform that offers premium greeting cards designed by local artists. Our cards, and even our envelopes, are made of recycled paper. We basically follow a crowd-sourced model where designers get royalties on each card sold. Our value proposition goes beyond sending out a physical greeting card. For example, if you want to send a birthday card to a friend:

  1. You come to our site
  2. You pick a card
  3. You add the message and specify the address
  4. At checkout we give you the option to send a gift from one of our brand partners, such as a free yoga session or free driving minutes.

Most of these gifts are completely free, but in some cases it could be a discount such as get $20 off when purchasing $100. Adding a gift is completely optional and free of charge. You only pay for the card that is $5 plus postage, a price at least 20% cheaper than that of other recycled-paper cards.

Once you have selected everything, we print out the card and a real person will handwrite your message. We hire calligraphy artists to actually write these messages. In this way, Just Greet brings together the three sides of the market: designers, brands, and users.

For our brand partners, we provide a much better alternative to direct marketing. Instead of a brand directly reaching out to you, a friend or family member who knows that you like or might like a certain brand sends you a greeting card with a gift voucher inside. It’s a totally different scenario.

With Just Greet you can send a card anywhere in the world just paying for the additional postage charges. We are only working with Canadian artists with 80% of them being from Vancouver. At the moment, we have signed up 10 to 12 artists and we offer about 100 designs. We add artists and brand partners on a rolling basis. So far, we have 7 brand partners.

Last August, we did a pre-seed financing round for $150,000 from prominent angel investors in town such as Varshney Capital Corp and VancityBuzz. Our goal is to get some traction and do another financing round in March so we can add some cool features. We want to develop a mobile app so users can send a card from their phone and designers and brands can have a login to submit their offers online. Even our gift vouchers would be digital. We want Just Greet to be as tech advanced as possible.

We are launching the platform in a couple of weeks, definitely before the end of November. We want to be ready for Christmas as that is the biggest market for greeting cards.

How did you come up with this business idea?

This is actually my third startup. I am always looking into ideas that are pretty unique, more disruptive like Blue Ocean startup ideas. Greeting cards is a huge market and a really good one if you can differentiate your product enough.

We have a mandate of sharing love and spreading joy. There are certain moments in everyone’s life when sending a greeting card is a great choice. People still like physical cards and recycled ones are less than 1% of the greeting card market even today. Our goal is to push this market in the next three years and get people to buy more recycled cards.

I initially wanted to make physical greeting cards free of cost. Later, after doing some market research, I understood better what could resonate with customers. We did a soft launch in February and we got a lot of feedback from users. In this way, I understood that the original idea was not the best for this market and we adjusted the service to what it is today.

How did you go about understanding the potential and market for your business idea? Which were/are your most useful market research tools?

We started with secondary market research using Google. There are many reports on the greeting card market, but we mainly used two resources: the US Greeting Cards Association and IBIS report for the Canadian market. It’s actually surprising how big the market is. People don’t really talk about it, but it’s double the global music industry market, about USD 30 billion globally. In the US, 3.5 billion cards were sold last year and 6 billion cards if we consider as well the B2B segment.

We also did market research in Vancouver with a professional agency- Lux Insights and understood then that people still like physical greeting cards –60 to 70% of people said they would like to use Just Greet. This was a very aggressive decision for us since startups don’t usually spend money in market research.

As MBAs we can always do our own research, but I wanted to be 100% sure in terms of the quality of the data. The dilemma for me was to either save some money and take the risk, or spend them and use the remaining money for an effective strategy. With market research you know who your customers are, what they are looking for and how much they are willing to pay.

About Teja Edara

Teja is a serial entrepreneur with more than four years of experience in marketing, sales and management consulting. He has worked with multiple stakeholders extensively in India and the United Kingdom. Having created and operated successful ventures in outdoor advertising and e-commerce in the Indian market, he has developed great expertise in sales, strategy and customer experience in a start up environment.

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