As part of the UBC Public Scholars Initiative, a myriad of scholars from a wide variety of disciplines discuss the topic of advancing health and inclusion.


Speakers

Laura Bulk (Rehabilitation Science) is part of the Being Blind team, working to expose misperceptions about what it means to be Blind, and to create an engaging campaign challenging such misperceptions.

Bulmaro Valdes (Biomedical Engineering) applies his science and engineering knowledge to help people with disabilities. He works directly with stroke survivors and therapists to develop new technological solutions to current rehabilitation issues.

Beth Clark (Interdisciplinary Studies) focuses on how transgender youth, their parents, caregivers, and health care providers can work together to make health care decisions that support trans youth well-being.

Stephanie Glegg (Rehabilitation Science) examines how relationships support/hinder evidence uptake in healthcare. By targeting the social influences that drive evidence use, she aims to improve patients’ timely access to healthcare innovations.

Aarthi Gobinath (Neuroscience) works on treating postpartum depression, investigating how different types of maternal antidepressant exposure affect the neurobiology of mothers and the male and female offspring in adulthood.

Celestin Hategeka (Population and Public Health) evaluates the effectiveness and implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention (ETAT+) in Rwanda to improve quality of hospital care for newborns and children.

Jaime Semchuk (Educational and Counselling Psychology) collaborates with high schools in BC to adapt, implement, and evaluate mental health literacy interventions with an aim to build capacity for promoting student wellbeing, reducing stigma, and effectively supporting students who experience mental health difficulties.

Evan Taylor (Language and Literacy Education) is a health literacy researcher and advocate whose work focuses on trans* and gender nonconforming people’s experiences of cancer and health decision-making.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bulk, L. et al. (2017). ‘We are not anything alike’: marginalization of health professionals with disabilities. Disability & Society. [Link]

Bulk, L., Glegg, S. et al. (2015). The legitimization process of students with disabilities in health and human service educational programs in Canada. Disability & Society. [Link]

Valdes, B. et al. (2016). Kinecting the moves: The kinematic potential of rehabilitation-specific gaming to inform treatment for hemiparesis. International Journal of Child Health and Human Development. [Link]

Clark, B. et al. (2017). “I would have preferred more options”: Accounting for non‐binary youth in health research. Nursing Inquiry. [Link]

Glegg, S., Livingstone, R., & Montgomery, I. (2016).Facilitating interprofessional evidence-based practice in paediatric rehabilitation: Development, implementation and evaluation of an online toolkit for health professionals. Disability and Rehabilitation. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Choleris, E., & Galea, L. A. M. (2017). Sex, hormones, and genotype interact to influence psychiatric disease, treatment, and behavioral research: Sex, hormones, and genotype in behavioral research. Journal of Neuroscience Research. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Mahmoud, R., & Galea, L. A. M. (2014). Influence of sex and stress exposure across the lifespan on endophenotypes of depression: Focus on behavior, glucocorticoids, and hippocampus. Frontiers in Neuroscience. [Link]

Hategeka, C., Mwai, L., & Tuyisenge, L. (2017).Implementing the emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care (ETAT+) clinical practice guidelines to improve quality of hospital care in rwandan district hospitals: Healthcare workers’ perspectives on relevance and challenges. [Link]

Hategeka, C., et al. (2017). Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda. Plos One. [Link]

Semchuk, J. (2016). Adolescent experiences of seeking and receiving support at school for significant mental health concerns. [Link]

Taylor, E. T. (2013). Transmen’s health care experiences: Ethical social work practice beyond the binary. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services. [Link]


The BC Breath of Life Archival Institute for First Nations Languages provides First Nations community language workers the opportunity to participate in a week-long Institute being hosted at the University of British Columbia from May 14-20, 2017, for the reclamation and revitalization of BC First Nations languages. Kim Lawson, Reference Librarian at the Xwi7xwa Library, speaks on the particular topic of archival research.

Modeled on the “Breath of Life” Language Restoration Workshops initiated in the mid-90s by the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival, our objective is to promote active collaboration among people with a wide range of perspectives on language and culture to explore archives and museum collections at UBC in order to “breathe life” back into the manuscripts and other resources there, with the overarching goal of contributing to the health and sustainability of BC’s First Nations languages for future generations. Participants will be grouped into research teams, based on language affiliations, bringing together First Nations community language workers (broadly defined to include Elders, language learners, teachers, curriculum developers, and others working towards language vitality) and university-based scholars with diverse skills that can contribute to finding and interpreting materials relevant to language and culture reclamation. Team members will actively work together to study resources housed in various collections at UBC that are directly relevant to their languages. Team members will mentor one another and share their expertise throughout the program, building not only research resources, but also relationships for potential on-going collaboration.

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