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This year’s theme, “Open for Collaboration”, set by SPARC (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) for its 8th International Open Access Week will be held on October 19-25, 2015.

“The energy that’s generated when smart, committed people work together on issues they care deeply about is palpable,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC. “This year’s Open Access Week gives us the opportunity to highlight examples of that energy in action – and to create opportunities for new partnerships to be forged.”

Key highlights of the “Open for Collaboration” theme for 2015 are as follows:

• Emphasize the ways Open Access enables new avenues for collaboration between scholars by making research available to any potential collaborator, anywhere, any time
• Explore how cooperation between stakeholder communities helps to set the default to open for scholarly communication
• Provide an opportunity for Open Access supporters to consider working with those in similar, allied movements for Open Data and Open Education to advance common goals more quickly

In ongoing support of this global event, UBC has held its Open UBC Week (formerly Open Access Week) events annually since 2008 with last year`s Open UBC Week 2014 event marked as “the most successful one to date”.

Stay tuned for more Open UBC Week 2015 news!

Above partial text excerpts are courtesy of SPARC | Above photo courtesy of Ideas | Digital Transformations

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Meet Saule Chikeyeva and Catherine Haney – the latest winners of the 2014 GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award!

Saule Chikeyeva comes from the UBC Department of Educational Studies and won this Award for the work, “Policy Analysis of the Per Capita Funding of Public Schools in Kazakhstan” at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/50452. Chikeyeva sets out “to better understand the per capita financing pilot project” in the context of the ‘chosen funding model and its educational aims through the lenses of efficiency, equity, equality, adequacy and accountability’.

Catherine Haney (pictured above) is a PhD student from the UBC School of Nursing. Haney won this Award for her work, “Considering oral history: Methodological questions and reflections” at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/46680. If her name sounds familiar, it could be due to the fact that she has published two other works in cIRcle – a 2011 MSc thesis at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/39214 and a journal article at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/45155. Along with other UBC Nursing colleagues, staff and faculty, Haney helped organize a successful graduate student research symposium held at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre on May 2, 2014. It showcased innovative nursing research plus ideas and drew presenters from Canada, Washington State and as far away as Brazil.

Congratulations to Saule Chikeyeva and Catherine Haney on winning the Award – valuing $500 each!

The GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award aims to feature UBC as a leader in the open dissemination of graduate non-thesis coursework projects or manuscripts subject to instructor approval. Award details at: http://circle.sites.olt.ubc.ca/gss-graduate-student-society-open-scholar-award/

Above image is courtesy of UBC Graduate Student Society

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It is our pleasure to announce that the Planat in Action: Accessibility Assessment of UBC Competition and Accommodation Venues for the Special Olympics Canada 2014 Summer Games report is available in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository!

Serving as the host venue from July 8-12, 2014, UBC’s Vancouver campus proudly welcomed 1,300 athletes with intellectual disabilities for the Special Olympics Canada 2014 Summer Games. Over 350 students, staff and faculty from the UBC community signed up for volunteer opportunities for the Games.

These opportunities ranged from “UBC varsity athletes [who] volunteered at training camps and formed a team with Special Olympics BC athletes at the annual Storm the Wall student recreation event” to “[m]ore than 100 students [being] involved in projects related to the Games such as creating maps, reducing waste, sourcing local food, and eliminating the need for bottled water” and much more.

This report provides a summary of each venue used during the Games along with recommendations. It is based on information and photo gathering on current accessibility and inclusive features at venues and public spaces used during the Games.

Read the full report in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/50894.

Explore the Centre for Sport and Sustainability (CSS) community and its collections in cIRcle at: https://circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/35776.

Above text in italics is courtesy of 604 Now

Above image is courtesy of the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre

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Guest post by Eugene Barsky, Research Data Librarian, Library Administration

The Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery (BIRS) and The University of British Columbia’s (UBC) Library are pleased to announce their collaboration on a project to preserve, archive and diffuse the lecture videos from BIRS’ weekly workshops at UBC Library’s digital repository, cIRcle.

BIRS is a place where the imperatives of collaborative and cross-disciplinary research in the mathematical sciences are addressed. Another one of its unique features is that it provides a fully-automated live video broadcasting and recording system for most of its scientific activities. On average, researchers record 20 lectures per week for 48 weeks of the year, totaling approximately 1,000 files – all of which are freely available on the BIRS website.

BIRS’ collaboration with cIRcle provides robust and long-term digital preservation for these videos, as well an enhanced accessibility for scholarly researchers worldwide through UBC’s online library service. Their digital archival system will guarantee the content is discoverable and indexed in popular search engines, thus helping to increase the global reputation of BIRS.

“BIRS is delighted to have its lecture recordings at UBC’s digital repository. The UBC Library has the resources and expertise for proper long-term archiving and preservation of BIRS’s extensive scholarly output, so this is a big win for the world’s mathematical science community!” remarked BIRS’ Director and UBC professor, Dr. Nassif Ghoussoub. The end result is the first large-scale project to digitally preserve and disseminate mathematical science research output in video format.

BIRS is one of the world’s most prominent mathematical science research institutions. It maintains strong ties with UBC’s most prominent mathematicians, statisticians and computer scientists– its Board includes UBC President Arvind Gupta. Every year, about 2,100 researchers representing 400 institutions from more than 60 countries, participate in BIRS’ scientific programs, creating a content-rich framework for sharing research, knowledge and information.

“This partnership represents an exciting opportunity to develop the kind of unique collections in cIRcle which showcase UBC’s research strengths and global profile,” says Bronwen Sprout, Coordinator, Digital Programs and Service for UBC Library. “In this instance, cIRcle is the destination for high quality mathematical peer reviewed research.”

The BIRS videos launched in cIRcle this summer and already boast more than 4,000 downloads. New videos continue to be digitally preserved and uploaded.

To view the current inventory of BIRS videos in cIRcle, visit https://circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/47157

For more information on UBC Library’s cIRcle, visit https://circle.ubc.ca/

For more information on BIRS, visit https://www.birs.ca/

Above image is courtesy of BIRS

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